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KC2004
07-22-2008, 10:38 PM
My dad is a Vietnam vet. Nothing strange about that a lot of us are kids of vets of WWII, Korea, or Vietnam. What i find strange is that most Vietnam Vets are quiet about their service. I don't talk to my Dad much about the war or what happened. He offers bits and pieces of the war thats amusing but lays off when it goes to the sad side of war. He did two voluntery tours and won a bronze star. If ya asked him he deserved none of the awards and was just lucky. To me my Dad is a hero! No matter what he did in Nam he will always be the man to me. He took alot of shit when he got home. Thoughts may have changed since then but you got to realize that that's whats sticks out in my fathers mind most about the war. I'm not preaching about Vietnam or what happen 30 years ago and don't think my Dad would want me to. I Just want to make sure we thank our Vets this time cause they didn't ask to go.....we sent them. To all the guys and gals out there protecting my freedom THANK YOU!!!!!:clap:

Skip Towne
07-22-2008, 10:43 PM
I did my part '68 - '73.

KC2004
07-22-2008, 10:43 PM
I did my part '68 - '73.

Thank you!!!!!!

Mr. Flopnuts
07-22-2008, 10:47 PM
Posted via Mobile Device

Vietnam is the reason soldiers aren't dealing with that bullshit today. We learned from our mistakes, we realize that these kids don't ask for this life. It's a shame your dad had to endure those trials, but being a true American hero is never easy. Give your pops a manly clap on the shoulder for Mr. Flopnuts the next time you see him.

KC2004
07-22-2008, 10:51 PM
I offered once to take my dad's medals and put them in a display case but he told me they needed to stay where they were. I was young and didn't understand that they may have brought him bad memories. I'm proud of him and my bro-inlaw that served a year in IRAQ.

Phobia
07-22-2008, 10:51 PM
Yeah - Vietnam guys had it bad. I came home from Desert Storm with a chest full of medals and ribbons - 10 or 11 of them - some deserved, some just right (or wrong) place. I don't think the 'nam guys got that many for multiple tours so I feel kinda guilty about them. I even got a shadow box a couple Christmases ago and still haven't put anything in it. Maybe one day.

FAX
07-22-2008, 10:54 PM
Kudos to your dad, Mr. KC2004. Nam was a hell hole. I'm glad he made it back and he deserves our praise and respect. My older brother's name is on the wall and I, for one, will never forgive the bastards in Washington who saw to it we lost those lives.

FAX

KC2004
07-22-2008, 10:55 PM
Yeah - Vietnam guys had it bad. I came home from Desert Storm with a chest full of medals and ribbons - 10 or 11 of them - some deserved, some just right (or wrong) place. I don't think the 'nam guys got that many for multiple tours so I feel kinda guilty about them. I even got a shadow box a couple Christmases ago and still haven't put anything in it. Maybe one day.

It amazes me that most people forget about you guys. Maybe it's cause you guys kicked ass so quick. None the less thank you Phobia for your service.

KC2004
07-22-2008, 10:58 PM
Kudos to your dad, Mr. KC2004. Nam was a hell hole. I'm glad he made it back and he deserves our praise and respect. My older brother's name is on the wall and I, for one, will never forgive the bastards in Washington who saw to it we lost those lives.

FAX
Sorry to hear that bro. Don't know what to say. Your brother gave the ultimate sacrifice for his country and I wanna say thank you. Home of the free and the land of the brave. Had to be tough.

Phobia
07-22-2008, 11:18 PM
It amazes me that most people forget about you guys. Maybe it's cause you guys kicked ass so quick. None the less thank you Phobia for your service.

It was rough over there but nothing like the 'nam guys and the current Iraq guys are going through. I don't deserve too much credit. I was a lowly boot over there. Some of my greatest achievements were burning crappers. Heh.

Phobia
07-22-2008, 11:20 PM
Kudos to your dad, Mr. KC2004. Nam was a hell hole. I'm glad he made it back and he deserves our praise and respect. My older brother's name is on the wall and I, for one, will never forgive the bastards in Washington who saw to it we lost those lives.

FAX
I did not know that. Sorry for your loss. You don't give out too much of yourself out here. Thanks for sharing.

DaneMcCloud
07-22-2008, 11:34 PM
Kudos to your dad, Mr. KC2004. Nam was a hell hole. I'm glad he made it back and he deserves our praise and respect. My older brother's name is on the wall and I, for one, will never forgive the bastards in Washington who saw to it we lost those lives.

FAX

Mr. Fax,

Out of your 17,000+ posts filled with quirky advice, humor and disdain, this has to be the most disheartening and honest of them all.

I feel for your loss. Even after all these years.

Best to you and your family.

DaneMcCloud
07-22-2008, 11:36 PM
Yeah - Vietnam guys had it bad. I came home from Desert Storm with a chest full of medals and ribbons - 10 or 11 of them - some deserved, some just right (or wrong) place. I don't think the 'nam guys got that many for multiple tours so I feel kinda guilty about them. I even got a shadow box a couple Christmases ago and still haven't put anything in it. Maybe one day.

As a guy who never considered joining the military, whenever we get together (hopefully before we both kick it!), I'd really like to hear your stories of service.

And even though you may not feel like you earned those medals and commendations, I pretty damn sure that you did.

mauifan
07-22-2008, 11:45 PM
It was rough over there but nothing like the 'nam guys and the current Iraq guys are going through. I don't deserve too much credit. I was a lowly boot over there. Some of my greatest achievements were burning crappers. Heh.

Hey Phobes.., Long time no see..,

MadMax
07-23-2008, 12:09 AM
I did my part '68 - '73.

And God bless you Skip... 84-90 here old man :) I have nothing but total respect for all that have served. And I mourn the loss of all that gave ALL!! The Big Red One rolls on and kicks ass and takes names...And to Phobia, if you got medals, you earned them IMHO... Take care everyone here I am in a state of " Pissed at the world " because of my illnesses...I wanna thank everyone and I mean everyone for allowing me to express my emotions lol

Mojo Rising
07-23-2008, 01:29 AM
Honor to all that have served.

I was not from a military background by birth but married the daughter of a Purple Heart and Flying Cross pilot.

I have gained much respect for the efforts and courage of the people who defended and fought for our freedom during this time.

Over Memorial Day Weekend my Dads buddy sent a Patriotic email. I replied with the story of my father in law. He replied that he flew re con over the area my father in law was shot down and was impresssed with the courage he had to fly over this region.

mauifan
07-23-2008, 01:52 AM
I'm kinda new here but God bless your father KC2004 and everyone else that served.., And those currently serving.

KC2004
04-03-2009, 09:31 PM
bump

EyePod
04-03-2009, 09:35 PM
It was rough over there but nothing like the 'nam guys and the current Iraq guys are going through. I don't deserve too much credit. I was a lowly boot over there. Some of my greatest achievements were burning crappers. Heh.

Did you ever see Jarhead? I thought it was good for the public to see a different side of war. I really hate seeing people in power do shit like this when most of the little guys could give two rat's asses.

joesomebody
04-03-2009, 09:43 PM
Much props to your dad. I have nothing but absolute respect for those who serve.

Buehler445
04-03-2009, 09:47 PM
Veterans rep

KC2004
04-04-2009, 10:10 PM
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WilliamTheIrish
04-04-2009, 10:20 PM
My Dad was a Marine SGT who spent time on Saipan, Tinian and then was part of the occupational force on the mainland of Japan after the bombs.

He never talked about what he did, saw, or heard. When we had family reunions, the patriarchs would retire to the garage and apparently rehash stories over whiskey shots.

All of those men, save one, are gone from this earth. I'm torn between wanting to know what they experienced and the admiration of them being men who did their duty and came back to civilization without saying a word.

Amazing.

KC2004
04-04-2009, 10:32 PM
My Dad was a Marine SGT who spent time on Saipan, Tinian and then was part of the occupational force on the mainland of Japan after the bombs.

He never talked about what he did, saw, or heard. When we had family reunions, the patriarchs would retire to the garage and apparently rehash stories over whiskey shots.

All of those men, save one, are gone from this earth. I'm torn between wanting to know what they experienced and the admiration of them being men who did their duty and came back to civilization without saying a word.

Amazing.


Its amazing what these guys have been through and sometimes its better left unsaid.

Rain Man
04-04-2009, 10:34 PM
My father in law has two Silver Stars as a helicopter battalion commander. He generally doesn't talk about it, but occasionally does, and I always find it interesting. About a year ago, he was mentioning attacking some bunker on the coast, and mentioned calling in a battleship. I said, "You called in a battleship?" He said yeah, and it was interesting to watch those massive shells come in and hit the mountainside. I said, "You called in the big guns?" Yeah.

Calling in a battleship to use its main guns would be about the coolest thing ever.

2bikemike
04-04-2009, 10:56 PM
I have lots of relatives who served. My dad was a Korean war and Vietnam War vet. My uncles were from WWII also a cousin from the Vietnam war. Very rarely do any of them speak of the bad shit that happened. One of my uncles was part of the forces that liberated Dachau. Apparantly during a night of drinking he let loose with my dad and cousin about some of the stuff that he saw. Several prisoners rushed the liberators and fell beneath the half tracks and were crushed because they were so weak. He took that very hard.

KC2004
04-04-2009, 10:59 PM
My father in law has two Silver Stars as a helicopter battalion commander. He generally doesn't talk about it, but occasionally does, and I always find it interesting. About a year ago, he was mentioning attacking some bunker on the coast, and mentioned calling in a battleship. I said, "You called in a battleship?" He said yeah, and it was interesting to watch those massive shells come in and hit the mountainside. I said, "You called in the big guns?" Yeah.

Calling in a battleship to use its main guns would be about the coolest thing ever.

Dad told me one time while he was by the DMZ doing radar on his second tour a funny story. He said every morning the NVA would come out and raise their flag. Well one morning someone called a navy ship and had them fire on the position. As they are raising the flag a shell comes in and takes the flag right off the pole. He said he was laughing his ass of till he realized he was on this hill with his small radar team and they had just piss off alot of NVA. Needless to say he was fine after that but that tells how accurate the Navy is. :thumb:

Jenson71
04-05-2009, 05:37 PM
A lot of WWII veterans until recently did not talk about their experiences. My mom grew up without hearing much of her father's days fighting in the cold during the Battle of the Bulge. But any grandkid old enough knows about it. Why is that? I think a lot of it has to do with the amount of respect our country and the history books have given to them. They have been dubbed The Greatest Generation on account of their sacrificing. Seeing how valued they are, how important it was to stop Hitler and fascism, has caused them to open up more.

The same can not be said for Vietnam veterans (I'm generalizing here of course). Does that mean those veterans were any less sacrificing and patriotic and good as their fathers and uncles? No, not at all. We just don't celebrate Vietnam like we do WWII, and it has nothing to do with the soldiers who fought it. They saw some incredible stuff -- agent orange, death to Vietnamese villagers, death to their friends and comrades, some very terrifying things. And in the back of their mind, there must be this incredible question of Why? because we know the country as a whole grapples with it. The most the issue of Vietnam comes up is when political party demagogues fight over it in regards to their candidates credentials. My mom remembers when her class found out one of their fellow student's brother was killed in Vietnam. There is just not much glory seen there. Only loss of a human life, a son, a brother, a person with potential that would more than likely still be here today.

ziggysocki
04-05-2009, 05:46 PM
Rep to all the vets on the board. I did mine as an M1A1 Gunner 95-99 had some tough days and a 6 month vacation in Kuwait, but nothing like the heros from Korea, Vietnam, WWII and now Iraq... I know how hard it could be in peace time, with only the threat of war, cant imagine those hellholes with bullets flying. My thanks to all of you.

BigMeatballDave
04-05-2009, 06:35 PM
This reminds me of my own dad. He served 4 tours. I don't ask him much about it. I'd like to hear more, but I don't want him to dig up things he's probably put to rest years ago.

sodcat
04-05-2009, 07:54 PM
I did 20 years in the Navy, 81-01, all my initial supervisors were vietnam vets, up until the last one in 94. One, an old senior chief rode my ass until it was strainhtened out. They were a special breed those vietnam vets, they are the ones who formed and molded todays modern war fighters. They deserve a lot more than what they got........

bobbymitch
04-05-2009, 09:14 PM
WWII - it had a whole country fighting the war, in one aspect or another. Clear opponents and a clear victory.

Viet Nam - Dman near tore the country apart. Not always clear on who the combatants were or why. Politicians running the war doesn't work. Not a victory. Vets coming home were shunned, no public thanks, had to cover up who were were.

We, as a nation, should honor the warrior, not a war.

MIAdragon
04-05-2009, 09:18 PM
WWII - it had a whole country fighting the war, in one aspect or another. Clear opponents and a clear victory.

Viet Nam - Dman near tore the country apart. Not always clear on who the combatants were or why. Politicians running the war doesn't work. Not a victory. Vets coming home were shunned, no public thanks, had to cover up who were were.

We, as a nation, should honor the warrior, not a war.

agree 100%

mauifan
04-05-2009, 11:38 PM
I'm a Vietnam Vet.., 1st Cav, 67-68 RVN, 11 bravo

I spent my whole tour in the bush, but I still can't comprehend what the guys went through in Korea. Those sonsobitches were true heros.., They call it the forgotten war but, I don't think there is one of us today that could be that cold, under supplied, ignored, half killed and overfrickinrun and not have it leave an impression.., They didn't get a parade either.., God bless em.., Don't ever forget those guys..,

ChiTown
04-06-2009, 06:16 AM
My Dad was a pilot in WWII. Not until his last years would he ever talk about his experience. He was a proud man. He was Patriotic, but not over the top. He felt ashamed for those that bragged of their service. He felt it was an honor to be able to serve during WII - a time when the World was on it's ear.

I love him and miss him every day. He was a great role model. I hope I have made him proud. R I P, Dad.

old_geezer
04-06-2009, 06:38 AM
VietNam (Army 1970-71) vet here. I have nothing but praise for all the men/women who have served or are currently serving our country. My son is currently stationed in the Persian Gulf (Navy).

MOhillbilly
04-06-2009, 07:41 AM
my dad was a 60 gunner 2/7A air cav 68'. i asked him once how many assaults he made to get his air combat service medal. he said he didnt know but it was a hell of alot more than 30. in the same conversation he told me he neverever did anything but rappel out of hueys.
I asked him about combat once, never seen my dad shed a tear in my life,till that day.

Love and the deepest respect to Americas warriors.

Dave Lane
04-06-2009, 09:56 AM
I think most vets I know that have really been in the shit don't talk about much or at all.

MOhillbilly
04-06-2009, 09:59 AM
I think most vets I know that have really been in the shit don't talk about much or at all.

agreed. i have a buddy who talks about iraq constantly. we think he is FOS. cause my bro who went dont say shit.

excessive
04-06-2009, 10:37 AM
I served during one of the few peace times to hit the 20th century, so I have no war stories to tell. Most of my memories come from the aftermath of Vietnam.

The deli where I worked let the vets have a room, and they meet once a week to do whatever it was they did. This was the eighties, and fifteen years later they were still wearing their field jackets and dealing with the bullshit that was dealt them. Most were struggling to make a go at being civilian.

Now we hear about the suicides rates with today's vet exceeding the combat losses, and it's just a reminder about how the sacrifices made don't necessarily end when the service does. We need to do better.

MOhillbilly
04-06-2009, 10:50 AM
Now we hear about the suicides rates with today's vet exceeding the combat losses, and it's just a reminder about how the sacrifices made don't necessarily end when the service does. We need to do better.


because the VAs answer to any kind of mental strain from combat is to turn the patient into a zombi.

Pestilence
04-06-2009, 12:06 PM
My Grandpa was in WWII. My Dad was in 'Nam. I did some time over in Qatar and my brother was over in UAE. I for one can say that my time wasn't hard but my Grandpa never talked about his and neither does my Dad.

Mr. Kotter
04-06-2009, 12:16 PM
Nice thought. Thank you, veterans. :thumb:

So....anyone in the thread yet with "trigger happy baby killers!" :hmmm:

eazyb81
04-06-2009, 12:24 PM
Whether you are for or against current or future military efforts, please do not forget to let veterans know how much you appreciate their willingness to put their own life on the line for the greater good of our country.

It seems like the disdain for Bush and the current war efforts in Iraq have made many people forget that veterans of this era are "real" vets and should be treated as such. My fiancee has a manager at work who's husband is in the National Guard and is going over to start his second tour in Iraq. The husband called work the other day to talk to his wife and my fiancee answered the phone first. Before transferring the call to his wife, she briefly told him how she appreciated him serving our country - no big deal at all. The next day, my fiancee's manager came in and told her with tears in her eyes how touched he was that she thanked him, and apparently she was one of the only non-family members that has bothered to thank him for serving.

These days it seems like we all get caught up in so much unimportant BS in our own lives that we forget that there are real people putting their own hopes and dreams on hold to defend our freedom. So, long story short, if you know someone who is about to head out for service or has recently come back, don't forget to thank them.

DeepPurple
04-06-2009, 12:24 PM
VietNam (Army 1970-71) vet here. I have nothing but praise for all the men/women who have served or are currently serving our country. My son is currently stationed in the Persian Gulf (Navy).

I was Army but was sent to Korea 1970-71. I finished Air Traffic Control school and had orders for Nam and went to orientation class for 3 days. Then when I turned up at the OR to get my orders to go on leave, they said the orders had been cancelled. My whole class was held over for a month and then we were all shipped to Korea, they said it was the first class in two years that didn't go to Vietnam.

Korea was pretty neat place, spent 13 months there up on the DMZ controlling helicopters that patrolled the border. We used FM for communications and on many occasions we would get the guys in Nam calling in artillery on our frequency clear as a bell. They could hear us also and a lot of times we would have to take turns talking. I remember their call sign was 'recon 95' and our call sign was Stanton Tower or Warrior Control.

El Jefe
04-06-2009, 12:54 PM
agreed. i have a buddy who talks about iraq constantly. we think he is FOS. cause my bro who went dont say shit.

I tend to agree with you on this. We have a guy who I go to church with was a sniper in Iraq. When he came back after his 2nd tour, he was a completely different guy. Has night terrors, PTSD, and is really not all there anymore. I feel very bad for he and his family. My dad's old Ken-Po teacher was a 2 tour Vietnam Vet, he was a Green Beret. Toughest SOB I've ever seen in my life, my dad said he would never talk about what he saw. The only guy who ever talked about his service was a guy at Church who served in WWII, he was on the Beaches of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge. I interviewed him for a middle school report, and some of his stories were frightening. He made it back, but lost his left arm.

Major Respect to all who have served, not a day goes by I don't thank the Lord for the freedoms we have, and what was sacrificed to keep them.

Phobia
04-06-2009, 01:12 PM
I think most vets I know that have really been in the shit don't talk about much or at all.

That might be a general rule but it's also dependent on personality type or upbringing too. A lot of people are an open book about everything, even the things that hurt.

El Jefe
04-06-2009, 01:16 PM
That might be a general rule but it's also dependent on personality type or upbringing too. A lot of people are an open book about everything, even the things that hurt.

I guess most vets have that tough guy persona, don't want to act like anything bothers them. Others may be of the philosphy that things don't need to be bottled up, and may feel it best to let those things out. FTR, I am not a veteran, just what seems to be most prevelent with my friends that are serving.

38yrsfan
04-06-2009, 02:45 PM
Didn't read all the posts but ...

War sucks ... Nam sucked even coming back home ....

At one time my father, my brother and I were all wearing OD ... both suffered and died from the results of war .....

Phobia
04-06-2009, 03:10 PM
I'm a Vietnam Vet.., 1st Cav, 67-68 RVN, 11 bravo

I spent my whole tour in the bush, but I still can't comprehend what the guys went through in Korea. Those sonsobitches were true heros.., They call it the forgotten war but, I don't think there is one of us today that could be that cold, under supplied, ignored, half killed and overfrickinrun and not have it leave an impression.., They didn't get a parade either.., God bless em.., Don't ever forget those guys..,

Maui, very unselfish of you, dude. You went through plenty. But this is just the type of guy you are. Miss seeing you once a year. Holler next time you get back.

mounged
04-06-2009, 03:37 PM
My father was WWII and Korea. The only time we heard about it was when he had had too much to drink. WWII wasn't his bad memories, but Korea was. He was a prisoner of war during it and retired rather than go to Vietnam. After he and mom died we found a purple heart and a bronze star. He never told us anything about the medals so we have no idea if they came from his prisoner of war days or not.

Phobia
04-06-2009, 05:02 PM
My father was WWII and Korea. The only time we heard about it was when he had had too much to drink. WWII wasn't his bad memories, but Korea was. He was a prisoner of war during it and retired rather than go to Vietnam. After he and mom died we found a purple heart and a bronze star. He never told us anything about the medals so we have no idea if they came from his prisoner of war days or not.

You should request his citations. That would make for some interesting family heirlooms - medals accompanied by citations.

Rain Man
04-06-2009, 06:00 PM
My family is just a bunch of civilians.

During WWII, one grandfather was a farmer (sharecropper, actually) and was exempt because he worked in a "necessary industry" or whatever it was called, and the other was a truck driver at an army base when the war started, so he was exempt for that reason. One great uncle survived getting shot by a sniper in the Pacific (could never bend his arm after that), and another one was an ambulance driver in Europe, but I met him maybe once in my life.

The generations didn't work for Korea since my dad's generation was too young and the grandparents were too old.

In Vietnam, all my uncles and my dad were married with kids and in their mid to late 20s, so they didn't get drafted for that reason. One younger uncle got drafted and should've gone, but my grandmother loved him more than all the other kids put together, so I think she made up some medical reason or something to get him out. I don't know exactly what happened there, but it wasn't stoic heroism. I had one semi-uncle who was in the Air Force, but I think he was in Japan or something, not Vietnam.

I've got a picture of my great-great-great grandfather in what looks like a Civil War uniform, but I can't tell if it's Union or Confederate. Either way, he served somebody.

mauifan
04-06-2009, 06:12 PM
Maui, very unselfish of you, dude. You went through plenty. But this is just the type of guy you are. Miss seeing you once a year. Holler next time you get back.
Gonna try and get back this year.., First beer is on me.

BTW.., did you have to wrestle Aretha for that hat ???

KCChiefsMan
04-06-2009, 07:23 PM
ya my Dad was in Nam too. He wouldn't ever talk about it though. I guess he was a helicopter pilot and also a gunman on the copter. I asked him once if he ever killed anyone (when I was like 5) he said he wasn't sure because you just spray that gun at the tree line. That's about all I got out of him, wish I could have a conversation about it now, guess I'll have to wait until I see him again. He got some medals, I believe it was the purple heart and silver star. His love for helicopters carried over after the war as he was an engineer for GE after that for 25+ years and was part of the team that did something to make the blackhawk engine better. He also worked on apache engines. My dad was a smart man, wish I could be more like him.

KC2004
04-06-2009, 09:10 PM
ya my Dad was in Nam too. He wouldn't ever talk about it though. I guess he was a helicopter pilot and also a gunman on the copter. I asked him once if he ever killed anyone (when I was like 5) he said he wasn't sure because you just spray that gun at the tree line. That's about all I got out of him, wish I could have a conversation about it now, guess I'll have to wait until I see him again. He got some medals, I believe it was the purple heart and silver star. His love for helicopters carried over after the war as he was an engineer for GE after that for 25+ years and was part of the team that did something to make the blackhawk engine better. He also worked on apache engines. My dad was a smart man, wish I could be more like him.


Asked my dad that question to and he just said I fired into the jungle. Maybe that helps them sleep a little better at night.

KC2004
06-13-2009, 08:30 PM
Top! Just wanted to say thank you again. We cant say it enough.

Coach
06-13-2009, 09:07 PM
My family is just a bunch of civilians.

During WWII, one grandfather was a farmer (sharecropper, actually) and was exempt because he worked in a "necessary industry" or whatever it was called, and the other was a truck driver at an army base when the war started, so he was exempt for that reason. One great uncle survived getting shot by a sniper in the Pacific (could never bend his arm after that), and another one was an ambulance driver in Europe, but I met him maybe once in my life.

The generations didn't work for Korea since my dad's generation was too young and the grandparents were too old.

In Vietnam, all my uncles and my dad were married with kids and in their mid to late 20s, so they didn't get drafted for that reason. One younger uncle got drafted and should've gone, but my grandmother loved him more than all the other kids put together, so I think she made up some medical reason or something to get him out. I don't know exactly what happened there, but it wasn't stoic heroism. I had one semi-uncle who was in the Air Force, but I think he was in Japan or something, not Vietnam.

I've got a picture of my great-great-great grandfather in what looks like a Civil War uniform, but I can't tell if it's Union or Confederate. Either way, he served somebody.

You could tell (my guess) by the shade of the coat and perhaps a hat, if he did wear one.

Lzen
06-13-2009, 09:39 PM
My FIL did time in Nam. He doesn't ever talk about it. I remember when Platoon came out. My wife said that he had a really hard time watching that flick. Brought back some fugged up memories, I guess. Those guys went through Hell. I never was in the military but I sure as heck respect them for what they had to do for their country.

RJ
06-13-2009, 09:53 PM
My step-dad and also a few close friends served in Vietnam. I've heard some interesting stories. Really interesting stories. I'm glad I wasn't old enough to go and they all have my respect.

RJ
06-13-2009, 10:06 PM
One of my closest friends, a Vietnam vet, had a little girl who died of leukemia when she was just four years old. The child was conceived after he came hom from his tour. He and his wife never had another child, they later divorced. A few years ago he started reading about birth defects among children of parents who were exposed to Agent Orange. My friend says he was exposed to Agent Orange several times while he was there, that he walked through fields that had been defoliated with it.

I've never heard him get mad about it or lay blame to anyone, but I can tell it weighs on him. It sure would weigh on me.