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View Full Version : Food and Drink Give me your method of cooking ribs on the grill.


ROYC75
07-27-2008, 10:12 AM
I want to try something different than I normally use today.

So give me something ........... QUICKLY !

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 10:14 AM
I'll be back in 30 minutes to get the info. Gotta go to the store and pick III up. BRB.

kstater
07-27-2008, 10:15 AM
Fire and meat, what other method is there?

Dartgod
07-27-2008, 10:16 AM
What kind of ribs?

BigVE
07-27-2008, 10:17 AM
Cook 'em slow and keep the heat low. No rushing allowed.

Bill Parcells
07-27-2008, 10:19 AM
Baby back pork ribs. soak them in apple cider vinegar for a couple of hours and then give them a light dusting of lowry seasoned salt on both sides right before you throw them on the grill. cook them on low heat for about 45 minutes to an hour (turning often). they will be crunchy on the outside and juicy on the inside. I hate ribs with that shit sauce smothered all over them.

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 10:20 AM
OK, you caught me before I got away, got both, pork spare and baby backs.

Just wanna try something different for a change......

RibKing67
07-27-2008, 10:21 AM
If I am gonna grill um and not smoke em I will put a dry rub on them first and then stick them in the oven around 350 for about 30-45 min then put them out on the grill on med to med low heat for around 30 mins untill done. While they are on the grill I will baste them in BBQ sauce. Hope this helps. I am sure someone will tell me I am wrong, so feel free to do it how you wish.

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 10:22 AM
Carrie usually boils them 1st, but I'm going to be in the yard all day with III and the grandsons doing yard work, I got all afternoon to slow cook them.

What method do you guys use and what type of rubs, sauces, etc.

Bugeater
07-27-2008, 10:27 AM
If I am gonna grill um and not smoke em I will put a dry rub on them first and then stick them in the oven around 350 for about 30-45 min then put them out on the grill on med to med low heat for around 30 mins untill done. While they are on the grill I will baste them in BBQ sauce. Hope this helps. I am sure someone will tell me I am wrong, so feel free to do it how you wish.

We do something similar, except I grill them first and then put them in the oven for a couple hours afterwards. I'm not sure what temp the Mrs sets the oven at but I think it's lower than 350. Phobia will say it's cheating but I don't have a smoker and it's better than trying to keep charcoal going in my grill for 3 hours.

BigVE
07-27-2008, 10:32 AM
Everyone's tastes are different when it comes to BBQ....do it however YOU like it and if YOU like it then it's good. Right? We aint in no stinking cook off. Who cares what someone else thinks about your/my/his/our method...cook it, eat it, enjoy.

RJ
07-27-2008, 10:45 AM
Some of this depends on the type of grill you have. I have a Weber 22" kettle and they're fairly common so we'll work with that.

Apply a dry rub. Use your favorite recipe or use the jar of rib rub in the spice cabinet or ask around here. You can let the ribs marinate in the rub or cook them right away, depends on how much time you have.

Next, start your coals. When they are completely ashed over, separate the into two mounds on either side of your grill. Then place a water pan - I just use a cheap aluminum pan - between the coals and fill it about half with water. Cover the grill and let the heat skow down, maybe ten minutes.

Now, if you have some wood chips - soaked for an hour or so - add them to the fire and then place your ribs over the water pan bone side down. Close the lid and go away for about an hour. When you come back apply some mop sauce to the ribs - again, your favorite recipe or ask around - cover and start up some more coals in a chimney starter or coffee can or whatever. Add bout 20 or so coals. After about 2 hours you may wish to wrap the ribs in foil, then cook for another 30 minutes.

That's the basics for a Weber kettle grill.

Bill Parcells
07-27-2008, 10:48 AM
Some of this depends on the type of grill you have. I have a Weber 22" kettle and they're fairly common so we'll work with that.

Apply a dry rub. Use your favorite recipe or use the jar of rib rub in the spice cabinet or ask around here. You can let the ribs marinate in the rub or cook them right away, depends on how much time you have.

Next, start your coals. When they are completely ashed over, separate the into two mounds on either side of your grill. Then place a water pan - I just use a cheap aluminum pan - between the coals and fill it about half with water. Cover the grill and let the heat skow down, maybe ten minutes.

Now, if you have some wood chips - soaked for an hour or so - add them to the fire and then place your ribs over the water pan bone side down. Close the lid and go away for about an hour. When you come back apply some mop sauce to the ribs - again, your favorite recipe or ask around - cover and start up some more coals in a chimney starter or coffee can or whatever. Add bout 20 or so coals. After about 2 hours you may wish to wrap the ribs in foil, then cook for another 30 minutes.

That's the basics for a Weber kettle grill.

:eek:

Holy shit!

RJ
07-27-2008, 10:59 AM
:eek:

Holy shit!


Heh, it's not near as much work as it might sound. Basically it just turns your Weber into a makeshift water smoker. The results are excellent and it's something to do while you drink beer. And then there's the fact I'm a geek, but that's another story.

I don't do it like that anymore, though, since I gots me my smoker!

Bill Parcells
07-27-2008, 11:20 AM
Heh, it's not near as much work as it might sound. Basically it just turns your Weber into a makeshift water smoker. The results are excellent and it's something to do while you drink beer. And then there's the fact I'm a geek, but that's another story.

I don't do it like that anymore, though, since I gots me my smoker!

I would be falling down drunk by the time I ate anything if I did it that way. :D

Thanks for the tips though. most of us east coasters use gas grills. the art of charcoal bar-b-qing here has gone the way of the stone age.

Dartgod
07-27-2008, 11:38 AM
Some of this depends on the type of grill you have. I have a Weber 22" kettle and they're fairly common so we'll work with that.

Apply a dry rub. Use your favorite recipe or use the jar of rib rub in the spice cabinet or ask around here. You can let the ribs marinate in the rub or cook them right away, depends on how much time you have.

Next, start your coals. When they are completely ashed over, separate the into two mounds on either side of your grill. Then place a water pan - I just use a cheap aluminum pan - between the coals and fill it about half with water. Cover the grill and let the heat skow down, maybe ten minutes.

Now, if you have some wood chips - soaked for an hour or so - add them to the fire and then place your ribs over the water pan bone side down. Close the lid and go away for about an hour. When you come back apply some mop sauce to the ribs - again, your favorite recipe or ask around - cover and start up some more coals in a chimney starter or coffee can or whatever. Add bout 20 or so coals. After about 2 hours you may wish to wrap the ribs in foil, then cook for another 30 minutes.

That's the basics for a Weber kettle grill.
This is good, except instead of mopping them, just spray them with apple juice every hour or so.

RJ
07-27-2008, 11:45 AM
Yeah, I always forget that lots of folks use gas. ROY, if you have a gas grill, I apologize for my worthless response.

On vacation a couple weeks ago in Western Kentucky I had some of the best ribs I've ever eaten. We bought them from a friend of my dad's who makes them at his house. He has quite a setup, a grill about 12 long x 2 feet wide x 3 feet deep. The guy cooks as a hobby and sells them for about enough to cover his costs. He's a big ol' boy and was out there wearing shorts, a wife beater and work boots and he lived way the hell out in the country. In the end, we decided there was a direct correlation between the size of the cook, the length of the drive and the quality of the ribs. They were damn good.

Phobia
07-27-2008, 12:12 PM
We do something similar, except I grill them first and then put them in the oven for a couple hours afterwards. I'm not sure what temp the Mrs sets the oven at but I think it's lower than 350. Phobia will say it's cheating but I don't have a smoker and it's better than trying to keep charcoal going in my grill for 3 hours.

Yeah, it's cheating but I'm not above it. I'll especially do it if it's bedtime and I need 4-6 more hours - I'll throw 'em in the oven with a timer set. Most your smoke absorption is complete in the first few hours anyway. After that it's just about maintaining heat.

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 12:21 PM
I knew a guy that uses beer and spices for his water mixture , what's the advantages of that ?

RJ
07-27-2008, 12:22 PM
Did he use it as a mop sauce?

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 12:22 PM
I do not have a gas grill ........ Kingsford for me!

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 12:23 PM
Did he use it as a mop sauce?

No, he used it in the tub, between the coals.

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 12:23 PM
I could see using as a mop sauce, or a spray bottle.

RJ
07-27-2008, 12:25 PM
I can't see any purpose at all. The beer doesn't do anything water won't do and the spices couldn't have any effect at all since they don't touch the meat. Sounds like a waste of beer to me.

ROYC75
07-27-2008, 12:25 PM
I can't see any purpose at all. The beer doesn't do anything water won't do and the spices couldn't have any effect at all since they don't touch the meat. Sounds like a waste of beer to me.

Kinda what I thought, it looked pointless and a waste.

RJ
07-27-2008, 12:26 PM
As a mop, yes, beer and some of your rub mix would make a fine mop.

jjchieffan
07-27-2008, 12:30 PM
I used to have a lot of trouble slow cooking ribs onn charcoal. The drippings would land on the coals, causing the fire to get too hot. I used a spray bottle to keep the flames down, but that only helped a little. I finally put down foil on the grill. That worked like a charm. The drippings landed on the foil, and then the meat simmerred in them, allowing me to slow cook them the way I wanted. They still had the smoke flavor because I was able to keep the lid closed and keep the smoke in the grill. My ribs come out great everytime now.

Bugeater
07-27-2008, 12:35 PM
I used to have a lot of trouble slow cooking ribs onn charcoal. The drippings would land on the coals, causing the fire to get too hot. I used a spray bottle to keep the flames down, but that only helped a little. I finally put down foil on the grill. That worked like a charm. The drippings landed on the foil, and then the meat simmerred in them, allowing me to slow cook them the way I wanted. They still had the smoke flavor because I was able to keep the lid closed and keep the smoke in the grill. My ribs come out great everytime now.

Strange, I've been using charcoal religiously for the last 5-6 years, and I've NEVER had any flare ups from drippings, if anything I've had trouble with drippings putting the coals out, especially when cooking hamburgers. I wonder why that would be, do you usually use a shitload of charcoal? Maybe I'm too stingy with it.

RJ
07-27-2008, 12:40 PM
I used to have a lot of trouble slow cooking ribs onn charcoal. The drippings would land on the coals, causing the fire to get too hot. I used a spray bottle to keep the flames down, but that only helped a little. I finally put down foil on the grill. That worked like a charm. The drippings landed on the foil, and then the meat simmerred in them, allowing me to slow cook them the way I wanted. They still had the smoke flavor because I was able to keep the lid closed and keep the smoke in the grill. My ribs come out great everytime now.




You might try the indirect method. It would allow your ribs so cook directly on the grill rather than the foil, which in essence sort of boils or steams the ribs and doesn't allow the fat a place to escape. I'm sure your method produces a tasty rib, just saying this might be something you'd like to try.



Indirect grilling: A hybrid process that bridges the techniques of grilling and barbecuing. In indirect grilling, the grill is set up in such a way that the fire is on one side or opposite sides of the grill and the food is cooked away from it, over the unlit portion. The virtue of this method is that it turns your grill into a sort of outdoor oven. Indirect grilling enables you to cook through a large piece of meat, such as a whole chicken or pork shoulder, without burning the exterior. It also allows you to smoke the food by adding wood chips or chunks to the fire. With indirect grilling, you don't need to turn the food. Indirect grilling is generally done at a medium temperature, 325 to 350 degrees F. It's always done with the grill covered.


http://food.ivillage.com/cooking/grilling/0,,9pj3-p,00.html

Frankie
07-27-2008, 01:03 PM
Give me your method of cooking ribs on the grill.

I cut a good recipe out of a magazine one time. I'll look for it. It was sent in by some guy named H. Lecter.

R&GHomer
07-27-2008, 01:35 PM
We do something similar, except I grill them first and then put them in the oven for a couple hours afterwards. I'm not sure what temp the Mrs sets the oven at but I think it's lower than 350. Phobia will say it's cheating but I don't have a smoker and it's better than trying to keep charcoal going in my grill for 3 hours.

I cook several things like this. Technically it's cheating, but I don't care. The meat is only going to absorb so much smoke. After three hours it's almost pointless. I don't have a true smoker so it's hard to keep a good steady low temperature. Honestly, I can't tell the difference. At least finishing them off in the oven is easier and allows me to make different sides. Win, Win if you ask me.

2bikemike
07-27-2008, 02:15 PM
I smoke my ribs. I usually use the 3-2-1 method for Spares. Baby backs don't need that long.

3= Smoke for 3 hours at about 225. Spritzing with apple juice about once an hour.

2= Remove from smoker and lay them out on a heavy duty sheet of foil. Spritz them liberally with the apple juice and wrap them up tight. Throw them back on the smoker for 2 hours. At this point I am just maintaining the 225 deg. with Charcoal.

1= Remove from smoker unwrap and place back on the smoker for 1 hour mopping with your favorite Q sauce

They're falling off the bone tender and juicy.

Damn now I'm hungry for ribs.