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thurman merman
08-05-2008, 03:46 PM
i got a job as a 5th grade teacher this year. at the end of every month i have a class auction, in which the kids use fake money they accumulate throughout the month to buy stuff from me. i have taught younger grades in the past, so it is easy to find stuff that little kids will like.

do any of you have kids in 5th grade? any advice for inexpensive stuff they would find cool? some stuff i already know: hannah montana, WWE wrestling, high school musical, guitar hero, skateboard stuff, etc. most fads that they are into, like the ones i mentioned, have some stuff that can be found cheap, such as books, stickers, folders, notepads, etc. any help would be greatly appreciated.

unothadeal
08-05-2008, 03:50 PM
Pussy

POND_OF_RED
08-05-2008, 03:54 PM
Purple Haze

tooge
08-05-2008, 04:02 PM
5th grade teachers that show some cleavage and bend over alot in small skirts.

LiL stumppy
08-05-2008, 04:03 PM
video games.

Dicky McElephant
08-05-2008, 04:04 PM
WPI Subscriptions.

NewChief
08-05-2008, 04:07 PM
There is an interesting piece in this (http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/research/Reading%20for%20pleasure.pdf)article about rewards. This is specifically related to literacy, so it might not pertain to you.

Here's the pertinent stuff:

How could extrinsic motivation be harnessed to bring about reading enjoyment?
There is a long standing controversy as to whether rewards such as money or tokens
can be used to develop or harness motivation to read or whether they undermine
children’s motivation for reading. The concern is that rewarding children for
engaging in an activity that they enjoy may lead them to infer that they participated
because of that extrinsic reason, which may lead them not to participate in the
activity in the future when the reward is not present (Kassin & Lepper, 1984).
However, the empirical evidence is inconclusive.

Several studies have shown that incentives do not significantly affect motivation to
read. For example, Edmunds and Tancock (2003) compared reading motivation and
the number of books read in three conditions: 1) no rewards, 2) reading-related
rewards, and 3) non-reading-related incentives. They reported that there were no
significant differences in reading motivation and reading amount between pupils
who received incentives and those who did not. Similarly, in an early meta-analysis
of intrinsic motivation in both children and adults, Cameron and Pierce (1994)
investigated the effect of verbal (e.g. praise) and tangible (e.g. tokens)
reinforcements on motivation to carry out a task. They concluded that rewards do
not negatively affect intrinsic motivation, even after such reinforcement is removed.
However, it should be noted that most of the studies reviewed in this analysis
contained studies that had focused on tasks that the children already enjoyed and it
is uncertain whether the same would apply to tasks that children do not find
enjoyable (Collins & Matthey, 2001).

By contrast, a later meta-analysis of 128 studies of the effects of extrinsic rewards on
intrinsic motivation showed that such rewards undermined motivation across a
range of populations, activities and types of rewards (Deci, Koestner & Ryan, 1999).
Again, the conclusions of this study were challenged by Hidi (2000) who
commented that the studies contained in this meta-analysis had focused mainly on
activities that were interesting. According to Hidi and Harackiewicz (2000, p. 159),

"The effects of external rewards may depend on the complexity of the activity and
the length of the involvement. More specifically, a combination of intrinsic
rewards inherent in interesting activities and external rewards, particularly
those that provide performance feedback, may be required to maintain
individuals’ engagement across complex and often difficult – perhaps painful –
periods of learning. "

Overall, McQuillan (1997) concluded that the available research did not provide
clear evidence that incentives were of benefit and that, therefore, money should be
spent on books rather than rewards. This suggestion is backed up by Marinak (2003)
who found that literacy-related rewards (e.g. books) did not undermine intrinsic
motivation to read, while rewards unrelated to reading (e.g. tokens) did. A good
compromise would therefore be for parents to reward children for reading with a
book of their own (Gambrell, 1998). Indeed, there is some evidence that a reward
that is linked to a desired behaviour will increase intrinsic motivation to carry out
that behaviour. For example, Gambrell and Marinak (1997) argued that:

"The appropriate use of incentives lead learners to engage in reading and can lead
to the internalization and integration of the value of reading. When incentives
are linked to the desired behaviour and promote engagement in the desired
behaviour, motivation can become self-determined and can foster high-quality
learning. Further, appropriate incentives offered for goal-oriented, challenging
reading performance can enhance intrinsic motivation to read. "

It therefore appears that literacy-targeted rewards, such as books or book
vouchers, are more effective in developing reading motivation than rewards
that are unrelated to the activity.

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 04:10 PM
There is an interesting piece in this (http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/research/Reading%20for%20pleasure.pdf)article about rewards. This is specifically related to literacy, so it might not pertain to you.

Here's the pertinent stuff:

thanks for the first serious answer.

sedated
08-05-2008, 04:26 PM
what do 5th graders like?

eating teacher penis

joesomebody
08-05-2008, 04:29 PM
Baseball/Football cards maybe? Also check out the Target Dollar spot, always a bunch of junk kids like there for cheap.

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 04:30 PM
Baseball/Football cards maybe? Also check out the Target Dollar spot, always a bunch of junk kids like there for cheap.

yeah they have cool stuff there. i think most of it is for younger kids, but i might check it out.

BigVE
08-05-2008, 04:31 PM
Maybe the board game "Are you smarter than a 5th grader"? ;)


For me when my kids were in 5th grade they LOVED it when they won their end of the year prize and got to out to lunch and eat free pizza with the teacher and the principal.

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 04:33 PM
Maybe the board game "Are you smarter than a 5th grader"? ;)


For me when my kids were in 5th grade they LOVED it when they won their end of the year prize and got to out to lunch and eat free pizza with the teacher and the principal.

haha yeah i actually already have that game. last year i wore a fake mustache and glasses and talked like jeff foxworthy while we played it in class. the kids thought i was awesome.

Sure-Oz
08-05-2008, 04:41 PM
pizza party's galore

The Bad Guy
08-05-2008, 04:51 PM
I teach 5th grade.

5th graders love High School Musical, Soulja Boy, Hannah Montana, WWE, Pizza and video games.

You're better off just collecting junk from other teachers and having a flea market style event each month.

blueballs
08-05-2008, 05:04 PM
the url to Chiefsplanet

Dicky McElephant
08-05-2008, 05:08 PM
I teach 5th grade.

5th graders love High School Musical, Soulja Boy, Hannah Montana, WWE, Pizza and video games.

You're better off just collecting junk from other teachers and having a flea market style event each month.


YAH TRICK YAHHHHHHHH!!11!!!ONE!!11!!!!

bogey
08-05-2008, 05:56 PM
Apparel with your schools insignia on it?

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 06:06 PM
Apparel with your schools insignia on it?

good idea, thanks.

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 06:06 PM
I teach 5th grade.

5th graders love High School Musical, Soulja Boy, Hannah Montana, WWE, Pizza and video games.

You're better off just collecting junk from other teachers and having a flea market style event each month.

what about pixar movies like cars and shrek? do they like those at that age, or are they 2 kewl 4 that?

morphius
08-05-2008, 06:07 PM
the url to Chiefsplanet
Well, they would be funnier than most of your posts.

Valiant
08-05-2008, 06:08 PM
Books, Crayons, stuff they can use at school and home..

Fat Elvis
08-05-2008, 06:10 PM
The very act of accumulating fake money is very enticing to 5th graders. My 5th grade teacher, 30 some-odd years ago used it to great effect. Sure you could buy things, but really only one kid in the class actually did that (oddly, his last name was Myzer). We had a whole economy with a stock market, real estate and farmland. In retrospect, it was pretty interesting because the biggest sellers were arts and crafts that other kids made (couldn't sell other items without parents permission).

JuicesFlowing
08-05-2008, 06:19 PM
Sports equipment. Ice cream.

Psyko Tek
08-05-2008, 06:20 PM
here's my son on the subject he's a fourth grader,
his name is Casey
Video games
Cards, pokemon, naruto and yugiho and such
Fast food gift certificates

that's all

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 06:21 PM
The very act of accumulating fake money is very enticing to 5th graders. My 5th grade teacher, 30 some-odd years ago used it to great effect. Sure you could buy things, but really only one kid in the class actually did that (oddly, his last name was Myzer). We had a whole economy with a stock market, real estate and farmland. In retrospect, it was pretty interesting because the biggest sellers were arts and crafts that other kids made (couldn't sell other items without parents permission).

yeah, the kids will be very involved with the classroom money system. they can earn up to $50 a week ($10 per day). for every incident that they lose a point (no homework, absent, behavior issues, not working, etc.) they lose $2. so for instance, if a kid loses 5 points in a week, they only get $40 instead of $50. also, there will be designated bankers week by week who distribute the money to the students, based on how many points they earned. so there is a maximum of $200 a month, and they can bid whatever they want at the monthly auction where i will be giving things away.

The Bad Guy
08-05-2008, 06:22 PM
what about pixar movies like cars and shrek? do they like those at that age, or are they 2 kewl 4 that?

Yes, they like those as well.

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 06:22 PM
here's my son on the subject he's a fourth grader,
his name is Casey
Video games
Cards, pokemon, naruto and yugiho and such
Fast food gift certificates

that's all

going into 4th grade this year?

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 06:23 PM
Yes, they like those as well.

cool, cause i got a boatload of "cars" stuff from the $1 section at target. hopefully they can take some of it off of my hands.

Tribal Warfare
08-05-2008, 07:00 PM
Can't go wrong with baseball/football/basketball cards, movie passes, and legos kids dig legos.

evolve27
08-05-2008, 07:03 PM
Field trips.

Valiant
08-05-2008, 07:16 PM
Of course this is sad also that we have to pay our kids to do their school duties now with gifts..

There is some inner city school, paying their HS students to show up and try and get good grades now.. It is not much, something like 500dollars at the end of the year if they do nothing wrong.. And each offense or bad grade takes money away from it..

thurman merman
08-05-2008, 07:17 PM
Of course this is sad also that we have to pay our kids to do their school duties now with gifts..

There is some inner city school, paying their HS students to show up and try and get good grades now.. It is not much, something like 500dollars at the end of the year if they do nothing wrong.. And each offense or bad grade takes money away from it..

i am using fake money, if that makes you feel any better.

The Bad Guy
08-05-2008, 07:27 PM
Of course this is sad also that we have to pay our kids to do their school duties now with gifts..

There is some inner city school, paying their HS students to show up and try and get good grades now.. It is not much, something like 500dollars at the end of the year if they do nothing wrong.. And each offense or bad grade takes money away from it..

It is sad, I agree.

What's even worse is the parents raising these kids. There are no consequences, no discipline with the kids. Kids don't do homework anymore, and the parents will make every excuse in the world for their kids. They want to be their friend instead of making sure they are doing the right thing.

Teachers are on the constant defense now with parents. When you call home to talk about an issue, most immediately attack you.

Valiant
08-05-2008, 07:38 PM
i am using fake money, if that makes you feel any better.


Oh it is not that.. It is the fact that teachers now have to resort to this type of actions to get the most out of their students..

Valiant
08-05-2008, 07:41 PM
It is sad, I agree.

What's even worse is the parents raising these kids. There are no consequences, no discipline with the kids. Kids don't do homework anymore, and the parents will make every excuse in the world for their kids. They want to be their friend instead of making sure they are doing the right thing.

Teachers are on the constant defense now with parents. When you call home to talk about an issue, most immediately attack you.

Totally agree..

My friends sister, was let go two years ago teaching middle school because she failed two students who refused to do work.. The principle tried to convince her to pass them and she refused.. So the principle went back and changed their grades and then him and the school board terminated her contract.. I guess the students parents are on the school board from what I am told..

I asked why she did not sue or make it public.. Have not heard back on the response..

blueballs
08-05-2008, 07:44 PM
Well, they would be funnier than most of your posts.

If gochiefs took my approach at posting
and applied it to hitting on women
he would be the Walt Chamberlin of Chiefsplanet

BigRedChief
08-05-2008, 07:50 PM
my wife is a 5th grade teacher. She does an auction like this for about 6 years or so. PM me your email and I'll forward it to her.

The Bad Guy
08-05-2008, 08:04 PM
Totally agree..

My friends sister, was let go two years ago teaching middle school because she failed two students who refused to do work.. The principle tried to convince her to pass them and she refused.. So the principle went back and changed their grades and then him and the school board terminated her contract.. I guess the students parents are on the school board from what I am told..

I asked why she did not sue or make it public.. Have not heard back on the response..

I'm a 5th grade teacher as well, and the way teachers get treated by principals is a sin. My principal wants to be every parent's friend because she got sued a few years ago. So the teacher's get the brunt of the bullshit.

The reason you put up with it is for the positive recommendation. Basically, where I'm at, without the recommendation of your past principal, you can't get another job.

I want to go back to my hometown next summer and get a teaching job. They are tough to come by, but with experience you can get them. I'll put up with whatever just to get that letter to get back there.

NewChief
08-05-2008, 09:15 PM
It is sad, I agree.

What's even worse is the parents raising these kids. There are no consequences, no discipline with the kids. Kids don't do homework anymore, and the parents will make every excuse in the world for their kids. They want to be their friend instead of making sure they are doing the right thing.

Teachers are on the constant defense now with parents. When you call home to talk about an issue, most immediately attack you.

I got to spend around 4 hours in phone conversation with a father whose son I caught blatantly plagiarizing from a website. Turns out the father was the guilty party. Not only had he written his son's paper, but he'd plagiarized it when he did his son's work. It was a great joy, especially when he started trying to use his son's 504 status as a veiled threat of lawsuit because we'd, obviously, not been meeting his accomodations.

The Bad Guy
08-05-2008, 09:37 PM
I got to spend around 4 hours in phone conversation with a father whose son I caught blatantly plagiarizing from a website. Turns out the father was the guilty party. Not only had he written his son's paper, but he'd plagiarized it when he did his son's work. It was a great joy, especially when he started trying to use his son's 504 status as a veiled threat of lawsuit because we'd, obviously, not been meeting his accomodations.

I'm a special education teacher, so I know all about threats of lawsuits.

I have a student who blatently task avoids, and wants constant one-on-one attention because he knows he can manipulate most teachers (not me) into doing the work for him.

Well, mom wanted constant one-on-one instruction written into his IEP, and I refused due to a) a staffing issue, b) the fact the child was capable.

She signed the IEP after a few days of nagging, but I never caved.

The accountability factor is lost with kids anymore.

Sully
08-05-2008, 09:59 PM
Reverse Cowgirl

-signed, Mary Kay Letourneau

SNR
08-06-2008, 12:01 AM
Books? For 5th graders? Give me a break.

Kids today read The Economist

Ultra Peanut
08-06-2008, 12:02 AM
Booze, mostly.

'Hamas' Jenkins
08-06-2008, 02:42 AM
A2M

CoMoChief
08-06-2008, 07:49 AM
WPI Subscriptions.

ROFL

Fat Elvis
08-06-2008, 08:38 AM
Of course this is sad also that we have to pay our kids to do their school duties now with gifts..

There is some inner city school, paying their HS students to show up and try and get good grades now.. It is not much, something like 500dollars at the end of the year if they do nothing wrong.. And each offense or bad grade takes money away from it..


I think it is important to understand that in my 5th grade class we didn't get any of the funny money for doing what was expected of us; the fake money was earned for doing things above and beyond what was required. You earned money, for instance, by reading extra books or by completing extra fractions--the larger the fraction, the more money you earned. You also had to show your work; you couldn't simply say you read a book, you had to do a book report; on the fractions, you had to show your work by hand for every step. It was a great motivator. We didn't have calculators back then--not that they really would of done any good because towards the end of the year we were adding fractions that had over 50 digits in the least common denominator. We'd literally have to tape sheets of graph paper together to keep track of our work. Pat Cobler once did a fraction with a 64 digit least common denominator; I think that record stood till the teacher retired.