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Jenson71
08-19-2008, 05:23 PM
Has anyone ever ran a half or full marathon before?

The Olympics are kind of inspiring, and I've always wanted to. Usually when I run, which isn't too often, I go about 1-2 miles and then walk some. So I was always trying to run a fast mile.

I want to run a full marathon though.

kstater
08-19-2008, 05:25 PM
I run a marathon in bed. 23.5 minutes.

Bwana
08-19-2008, 05:25 PM
I have run a half, never a full. A full would drop me deader than Elvis. I'm glad I did it, but never want to do it again.

Iowanian
08-19-2008, 05:29 PM
Isn't it Rick or wischief that is a triathalon guy? I'd ask them.

Rain Man
08-19-2008, 05:54 PM
I always wanted to, but my knees aren't made for more than about six miles. And now I'm fat.

DaKCMan AP
08-19-2008, 06:02 PM
Nope. I get terrible shin splints when I run distance so I stick to non-impact cardio (ie. bike, swimming, etc.).

Silock
08-19-2008, 06:19 PM
Yes. Can't do it any longer, though. Compartment syndrome in my legs. So, my next goal is a century ride on a bike.

Gotta get a bike first, though.

sd4chiefs
08-19-2008, 06:23 PM
Has anyone ever ran a half or full marathon before?

The Olympics are kind of inspiring, and I've always wanted to. Usually when I run, which isn't too often, I go about 1-2 miles and then walk some. So I was always trying to run a fast mile.

I want to run a full marathon though.

I used to run 10k's a lot. You need to get a good pair of good running shoes. I am talking about spending around $80 for some or you are doomed to blow out a knee. You will need to start out running a few miles a day for a few weeks and then work your way up to longer distances. Start with a some 5k and 10k races. You will need a lot of time to train for a marathon. A frend of mine would run 7 to 10 miles a day and then run 20 miles in one day on the weekends. He had to wear band-aids on his nipples. :( I thought about running a marathon once but I found that sticking needles in my eyes was a lot less painfull

Good Luck.

Donger
08-19-2008, 06:24 PM
You still run?

Only when chased.

Donger
08-19-2008, 06:24 PM
Yes. Can't do it any longer, though. Compartment syndrome in my legs. So, my next goal is a century ride on a bike.

Gotta get a bike first, though.

Go with a Bianchi.

SCTrojan
08-19-2008, 06:26 PM
I've run three and am training for my fourth in October. IMO anyone can complete a marathon. I've both run all the way and did a run/walk split. And I've seen people just walk pretty much the entire way.

If you're serious about getting into it, I'd recommend the Jeff Galloway book entitled "Marathon" approriately enough. It has training strategies for all manner of marathoners - from the sub 3 hour 30 minute people to the 6-7 hour range.

JuicesFlowing
08-19-2008, 06:33 PM
The most I ever used to run was 3 miles per night. I can't imagine being in shape enough to be able to run 13-26 miles ... I do miss running though.

Silock
08-19-2008, 06:38 PM
Go with a Bianchi.

That sounds like something you buy at Starbucks.

'Hamas' Jenkins
08-19-2008, 07:10 PM
I hate running with a passion, but more power to you.

I'd much rather do some distance swimming. I used to swim laps as a cool down after workouts--it is amazing the cardio conditioning swimmers are in. Swimming 5 laps of a short course pool left me dead to rights.

NewChief
08-19-2008, 07:19 PM
I'm considering my first Ultra (50k+) for this spring. I've run close to marathon distance for "fun", but I've never actually competed in a marathon. The ultra will be my first organized event. The rest have just been day long trail runs.

I'll agree with whoever said that marathon distance is doable by anyone. Just finishing that distance is probably more mental than anything. Finishing without being in severe pain might involve some training.

Valiant
08-19-2008, 07:20 PM
I used to run 10k's a lot. You need to get a good pair of good running shoes. I am talking about spending around $80 for some or you are doomed to blow out a knee. You will need to start out running a few miles a day for a few weeks and then work your way up to longer distances. Start with a some 5k and 10k races. You will need a lot of time to train for a marathon. A frend of mine would run 7 to 10 miles a day and then run 20 miles in one day on the weekends. He had to wear band-aids on his nipples. :( I thought about running a marathon once but I found that sticking needles in my eyes was a lot less painfull

Good Luck.

I have to do that when I play football..

As for the running a marathon.. You can be ready in 6 months if train 6 days a week.. You will be buying lots of shoes.. You will probably go thru a couple pair just training..

Valiant
08-19-2008, 07:22 PM
I'm considering my first Ultra (50k+) for this spring. I've run close to marathon distance for "fun", but I've never actually competed in a marathon. The ultra will be my first organized event. The rest have just been day long trail runs.

I'll agree with whoever said that marathon distance is doable by anyone. Just finishing that distance is probably more mental than anything. Finishing without being in severe pain might involve some training.

I have done a half.. What I learned is I like running adventure races better...

Infidel Goat
08-19-2008, 07:46 PM
Oprah ran a marathon. Al Gore ran a marathon.

Yes. Just about anyone can run a marathon.

Galloway's system is pretty easy and works. I ran no more than 32 miles in any week last year, and finished a respectable marathon in Richmond.

Galloway essentially calls for an easy run of 30 minutes on Tuesday and Thursday.
On Saturday, you run long (building from 4-6 miles up to around 20 miles) one weekend and do an eight miler (with a four mile tempo) the alternating weekend.

The other key is that Galloway insists upon 1 minute walking breaks--I think I used the walking break every two miles, but Galloway probably recommends them even more regularly. The thinking is that these small rests cost you maybe seven minutes in overall time (i.e. walking for 13 minutes only costs you about half that time because you are still making forward progress), but they save you much more because they keep you fresher near the end of the marathon.

As long as you can comfortably run for 30 minutes already, you can be ready in 3-4 months.

chief52
08-19-2008, 07:53 PM
I ran 3 half marathons back in the day. My line coach at JC was an avid runner and got me into it after football. Thought I was gearing up for the full, but never did tackle it. After training hard, the half was a lot easier than expected. But a full...

NewChief
08-19-2008, 07:54 PM
I have done a half.. What I learned is I like running adventure races better...

I watched my brother-in-law do an Ironman this summer. I sort of got swept up in the whole Ironman insanity and was kicking around the idea, but monetary and time expense is just too much. Plus, I'm a horrible swimmer.

It was just crazy to me that after he'd already done that insane swim and that insane bike, he was throwing a marathon on top of it. Ironman is a freaking feat. The craziest thing, though, is to watch one and see all of these dudes that look like they're completely out of shape and realize that they're kicking the shit out of dudes that look like they're professional athletes. So much of endurance racing ability has to be genetic.

WilliamTheIrish
08-19-2008, 08:22 PM
I've run two and used the Galloway method (Thanks Goat!) to train for both. However, I was so geared up at the start, I forgot to do any walking.

Finished in 4:07 and 4:03.

I ran both in San Diego and my goal for the next marathon is to run the one in Dublin, Ireland.

It's the most incredible experience to finish. I was exhilarated, exhausted, and I had to hold to hold back tears as I crossed the line. Don't know why, it just made me feel every emotion possible.

Can't wait to do it again.

NewChief
08-19-2008, 08:54 PM
It's the most incredible experience to finish. I was exhilarated, exhausted, and I had to hold to hold back tears as I crossed the line. Don't know why, it just made me feel every emotion possible.


I definitely got all teary-eyed just watching people cross the finish of the Ironman. Congratulations on the accomplishment!

eazyb81
08-19-2008, 08:58 PM
I ran my first 5K this month and am preparing for the Music City half marathon this April. I have been dealing with shin splints over the past year or so, and I've had to take some time off training, but it seems like I'm starting to work past them (fingers crossed).

I have always been an awful long distance runner, even as a kid, so it's pretty fulfilling seeing how far I can run now. You just have to get in a groove and go for it, but also be careful not to push yourself too fast. Good luck if you decide to do it.

morphius
08-19-2008, 08:59 PM
Some people I work with did a class on learning to run a marathon. It taught them how to work their way up. One of the girls is trying to run one in every state now and the guy I know has started doing triathlons. I personally hate running to run, so it isn't something I would ever do.

Jenson71
08-20-2008, 12:05 AM
Day 1: Today I ran one mile, then walked one mile, then jogged another lap.

Feeling: tired, but not dead tired. I walked home and lifted some weights.

Tomorrow's goal: run 1.5 miles, walk 1 mile

Jenson71
08-20-2008, 02:50 PM
Day 2: Things are going well in my preliminary training.

Today I did better than my goal:

Ran 1.5 miles, walked 1.5 miles.

Tomorrow will be a resting day: just focus on doing some weights.

El Jefe
08-20-2008, 03:16 PM
Nope. I get terrible shin splints when I run distance so I stick to non-impact cardio (ie. bike, swimming, etc.).

One word "Eliptical", awesome on your knees. I developed tendonitis in both knees after doing a vertical jump improvement program, and now always use the Eliptical when my knees are sore.