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kstater
08-20-2008, 04:55 PM
16-year-old quits school to play video game
Mother "couldn't take the complaining anymore"

By Mike Smith
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It's both a teenager's dream and a parent's worst nightmare.

Blake Peebles, a 16-year-old from Raleigh, NC., dropped out of high school last September in order to devote more time to playing Guitar Hero, according to an article in the Raleigh News & Observer. Peebles, who's receiving at-home tuition in lieu of his schooling, puts himself among the top 15 or 20 Guitar Hero players in the country, and has racked up about $1000 in prizes so far.

GUITAR HERO WORLD TOUR VIDEOS

Only a handful are able to make a living from professional gaming, but the number is growing. Peebles, who plays under the alias "Dreminem," hopes to become one of them. Although his parents didn't want him to ditch school, in the words of the article he "bugged them until they let him quit."

"We couldn't take the complaining anymore," Peebles' mother Hunter told the News & Observer. "He always told me he thought school was a waste of time." Blake hopes to win a place at the 2008 World Cyber Games Grand Final, which takes place in Germany in November, where -- if successful -- he'd take on gamers from over 70 countries.

Would he have better career prospects if he'd dropped out of school to be an actual guitarist? Time will tell.
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http://videogames.yahoo.com/feature/16-year-old-quits-school-to-play-video-game/1238119


Smack him around if that's what it takes.

RibKing67
08-20-2008, 04:57 PM
schrooll is for loosers

QuikSsurfer
08-20-2008, 04:57 PM
Wat?

BWillie
08-20-2008, 04:57 PM
He's 16.......I don't think theres anything the parent can do. I know in Iowa, at age 16 you can legally drop out of school if you want and theres nothing anybody can do about it.

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 04:58 PM
I'd smash his plastic guitar, and glue a desk too his ass.

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 05:00 PM
He's 16.......I don't think theres anything the parent can do. I know in Iowa, at age 16 you can legally drop out of school if you want and theres nothing anybody can do about it.

They could kick his monkey ass out on the street if he does.(or threaten him with it) Lots of parents go through this shit. You have to know how to protect your child from his own dumbass until they hit a certain level of maturity.

He would have plenty of time to work on his GH skills after he finishes his homework.

Phobia
08-20-2008, 05:02 PM
Oh darn. Here he was just on the brink of being voted most-likely-to-succeed by his classmates too.

Dicky McElephant
08-20-2008, 05:05 PM
Sweet....now cut the electricity to his room and take back the game (that you more than likely bought for him). Tell him if he wants to play it.....then he can pay for it all.

El Jefe
08-20-2008, 05:05 PM
Who needs skool?

Joie
08-20-2008, 05:06 PM
Peebles, who's receiving at-home tuition in lieu of his schooling

He didn't quit school entirely.

DaneMcCloud
08-20-2008, 05:07 PM
Personally, I say good for him. He can always get a GED and that certainly wouldn't stop him from going to college in the future.

If the kid's got talent and can win contests all over the world, I say "Why not?". What makes this any different from any child actor or teen music sensation?

If there's money to be made, go for it.

QuikSsurfer
08-20-2008, 05:07 PM
Just... Say.... No

Sure-Oz
08-20-2008, 05:07 PM
Homeless by 21

rad
08-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Personally, I say good for him. He can always get a GED and that certainly wouldn't stop him from going to college in the future.

If the kid's got talent and can win contests all over the world, I say "Why not?". What makes this any different from any child actor or teen music sensation?

If there's money to be made, go for it.

Money-grubbing whore.

Rain Man
08-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Billy Joel did the same thing, and he turned out all right.

Of course, he actually played real music instead of a video game, and he actually created material that had value instead of punching buttons like a pigeon in a psychology lab, but other than that, it's pretty much the same.

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Personally, I say good for him. He can always get a GED and that certainly wouldn't stop him from going to college in the future.

If the kid's got talent and can win contests all over the world, I say "Why not?". What makes this any different from any child actor or teen music sensation?

If there's money to be made, go for it.

The kid has won 1000 bucks TOTAL. We pay 200 at he bar I work at, and it's not that big. I see this kid playing video games in his soft ass parents' basement in his late 20s.

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 05:12 PM
Billy Joel did the same thing, and he turned out all right.

Of course, he actually played real music instead of a video game, and he actually created material that had value instead of punching buttons like a pigeon in a psychology lab, but other than that, it's pretty much the same.

This kid, and Billy Joel, have absolutely Nothing in common.

They are not come to the bar stick bread in his guitar, and say, man what you doing here.

La la la lalala

chiefs1111
08-20-2008, 05:13 PM
Homeless by 21

Ill say by 19

rad
08-20-2008, 05:14 PM
Billy Joel did the same thing, and he turned out all right.

Of course, he actually played real music instead of a video game, and he actually created material that had value instead of punching buttons like a pigeon in a psychology lab, but other than that, it's pretty much the same.

Yeah, it's like the exact same thing, only difference is it's completely different.

DaneMcCloud
08-20-2008, 05:14 PM
The kid has won 1000 bucks TOTAL. We pay 200 at he bar I work at, and it's not that big. I see this kid playing video games in his soft ass parents' basement in his late 20s.

GoChiefs? Is that you?

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 05:15 PM
Guitar hero's sweet

I used to compete

Back when I wore a younger man's clothes

Da da da dadada

Joie
08-20-2008, 05:16 PM
Ill say by 19

Nah. Mommy and Daddy aren't going to kick him out. He'll have a home until they go into a nursing home or die.

JuicesFlowing
08-20-2008, 05:36 PM
I would gladly flush the rest of my life down the toilet for $1,000 is prizes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Demonpenz
08-20-2008, 05:53 PM
another Quentin Tarantino

banyon
08-20-2008, 05:56 PM
He's 16.......I don't think theres anything the parent can do. I know in Iowa, at age 16 you can legally drop out of school if you want and theres nothing anybody can do about it.

That doesn't sound right.

Maybe if you're an emancipated minor, that would be possible, but otherwise I would think that he would be in violation of IA truancy laws and would subject himself to the orders of a court.

banyon
08-20-2008, 05:57 PM
So did this happen before or after the South Park episode?

Tiger's Fan
08-20-2008, 06:12 PM
That doesn't sound right.

Maybe if you're an emancipated minor, that would be possible, but otherwise I would think that he would be in violation of IA truancy laws and would subject himself to the orders of a court.

You can drop out of school at age 16, period.

Hydrae
08-20-2008, 06:18 PM
Peebles, who's receiving at-home tuition in lieu of his schooling

He didn't quit school entirely.

I saw that but do not understand what they mean. Unless they mean he is receiving at-home tutoring. I was trying to figure out who was paying him to stay home. :)

Lonewolf Ed
08-20-2008, 06:29 PM
He's 16.......I don't think theres anything the parent can do. I know in Iowa, at age 16 you can legally drop out of school if you want and theres nothing anybody can do about it.

Sure there is. Tell him, fine you drop school, we drop you out on the sidewalk. Of course, it would take backbone for a parent to do that, stand up for what is right against the kid's wishes. He might say how mean Mom and Dad are, too, and isn't that rough?

BWillie
08-20-2008, 06:42 PM
Sure there is. Tell him, fine you drop school, we drop you out on the sidewalk. Of course, it would take backbone for a parent to do that, stand up for what is right against the kid's wishes. He might say how mean Mom and Dad are, too, and isn't that rough?

Can you do that? Isn't that against the law to abandon your child before they are 18 unless they are in foster care?

Rain Man
08-20-2008, 06:45 PM
The law should phase youth into adulthood. For example, at age 16 you can do what you want one day per week. At 17, it goes up to 4 days, and at 18 you're an adult. This way, you can move out or drop out or drink at 16, but only for one day per week. The other six days you have to be at your parents' house.

Seems pretty logical to me.

BWillie
08-20-2008, 06:48 PM
The law should phase youth into adulthood. For example, at age 16 you can do what you want one day per week. At 17, it goes up to 4 days, and at 18 you're an adult. This way, you can move out or drop out or drink at 16, but only for one day per week. The other six days you have to be at your parents' house.

Seems pretty logical to me.

So at 18 it goes up to 7 days I can do whatever I want? Man, I wish I would of known that. I was on quite a short leash back then. My second semester of my Senior year in college would have been even more legen.....wait for it..dary

Ari Chi3fs
08-20-2008, 06:49 PM
They need to go the Championship Father thing this weekend

Mr. Plow
08-20-2008, 06:49 PM
The first thing to happen in my house would be the Xbox & all the games would mysteriously disappear while dad would suddenly have a new golf club.

BWillie
08-20-2008, 06:53 PM
The first thing to happen in my house would be the Xbox & all the games would mysteriously disappear while dad would suddenly have a new golf club.

If I was this kids parent. I'd call him out of the house, have his stupid little guitar hero laying on the sidewalk and unleash the fury with a big sledgehammer until he cried. Then I would kick him in the face and call him a pussy.

Over-Head
08-20-2008, 07:01 PM
Perhaps his parrents are JW's, hell they'd love the fact he's removed him self from "the world".
I wonder if the WTBS has come up with a game to teach them how to peddle even more Watchtowers and Awakes?:hmmm:

KCChiefsMan
08-20-2008, 07:02 PM
reminds me of that Too Short song

I got all my game from the streets of California
Young millionaire with no high school diploma

88TG88
08-20-2008, 07:22 PM
reminds me of that Too Short song

I got all my game from the streets of California
Young millionaire with no high school diploma
good stuff

Spott
08-20-2008, 07:35 PM
Homeless by 21


Or still living with his parents in his 30's.

CoMoChief
08-20-2008, 07:48 PM
He's 16.......I don't think theres anything the parent can do. I know in Iowa, at age 16 you can legally drop out of school if you want and theres nothing anybody can do about it.

I think there is a law similar to that in MO.

Saulbadguy
08-20-2008, 07:53 PM
I dropped out of high school at age 17. Not to play a video game though, I just didn't want to go anymore. I turned out alright...I think.

banyon
08-20-2008, 08:10 PM
You can drop out of school at age 16, period.

No. This is the rule in KS:

Article 11.--SCHOOL ATTENDANCE, CURRICULUM AND ACCREDITATION
72-1111. Compulsory school attendance; exemptions. (a) Subject to the other provisions of this section, every parent or person acting as parent in the state of Kansas, who has control over or charge of any child who has reached the age of seven years and is under the age of 18 years and has not attained a high school diploma or a general educational development (GED) credential, shall require such child to be regularly enrolled in and attend continuously each school year (1) a public school for the duration of the school term provided for in K.S.A. 72-1106, and amendments thereto, or (2) a private, denominational or parochial school taught by a competent instructor for a period of time which is substantially equivalent to the period of time public school is maintained in the school district in which the private, denominational or parochial school is located. If the child is 16 or 17 years of age, the parent or person acting as parent, by written consent, or the court, pursuant to a court order, may allow the child to be exempt from the compulsory attendance requirements of this section.

(b) If the child is 16 or 17 years of age, the child shall be exempt from the compulsory attendance requirements of this section if (1) the child is regularly enrolled in and attending a program recognized by the local board of education as an approved alternative educational program, or (2) the child and the parent or person acting as parent attend a final counseling session conducted by the school during which a disclaimer to encourage the child to remain in school or to pursue educational alternatives is presented to and signed by the child and the parent or person acting as parent. The disclaimer shall include information regarding the academic skills that the child has not yet achieved, the difference in future earning power between a high school graduate and a high school drop out, and a listing of educational alternatives that are available for the child, or (3) the child is regularly enrolled in a school as required by subsection (a) and is concurrently enrolled in a postsecondary educational institution, as defined by K.S.A. 74-3201b, and amendments thereto. The provisions of this clause (3) shall be applicable to children from and after July 1, 1997 and shall relate back to such date.

(c) Any child who is under the age of seven years, but who is enrolled in school, is subject to the compulsory attendance requirements of this section. Any such child may be withdrawn from enrollment in school at any time by a parent or person acting as parent of the child and thereupon the child shall be exempt from the compulsory attendance requirements of this section until the child reaches the age of seven years or is re-enrolled in school.

(d) Any child who is determined to be an exceptional child, except for an exceptional child who is determined to be a gifted child, under the provisions of the special education for exceptional children act is subject to the compulsory attendance requirements of such act and is exempt from the compulsory attendance requirements of this section.

(e) No child attending public school in this state shall be required to participate in any activity which is contrary to the religious teachings of the child if a written statement signed by one of the parents or a person acting as parent of the child is filed with the proper authorities of the school attended requesting that the child not be required to participate in such activities and stating the reason for the request.

(f) When a recognized church or religious denomination that objects to a regular public high school education provides, offers and teaches, either individually or in cooperation with another recognized church or religious denomination, a regularly supervised program of instruction, which is approved by the state board of education, for children of compulsory school attendance age who have successfully completed the eighth grade, participation in such a program of instruction by any such children whose parents or persons acting as parents are members of the sponsoring church or religious denomination shall be regarded as acceptable school attendance within the meaning of this act. Approval of such programs shall be granted by the state board of education, for two-year periods, upon application from recognized churches and religious denominations, under the following conditions: (1) Each participating child shall be engaged, during each day on which attendance is legally required in the public schools in the school district in which the child resides, in at least five hours of learning activities appropriate to the adult occupation that the child is likely to assume in later years;

(2) acceptable learning activities, for the purposes of this subsection, shall include parent (or person acting as parent) supervised projects in agriculture and homemaking, work-study programs in cooperation with local business and industry, and correspondence courses from schools accredited by the national home study council, recognized by the United States office of education as the competent accrediting agency for private home study schools;

(3) at least 15 hours per week of classroom work under the supervision of an instructor shall be provided, at which time students shall be required to file written reports of the learning activities they have pursued since the time of the last class meeting, indicating the length of time spent on each one, and the instructor shall examine and evaluate such reports, approve plans for further learning activities, and provide necessary assignments and instruction;

(4) regular attendance reports shall be filed as required by law, and students shall be reported as absent for each school day on which they have not completed the prescribed minimum of five hours of learning activities;

(5) the instructor shall keep complete records concerning instruction provided, assignments made, and work pursued by the students, and these records shall be filed on the first day of each month with the state board of education and the board of education of the school district in which the child resides;

(6) the instructor shall be capable of performing competently the functions entrusted thereto;

(7) in applying for approval under this subsection a recognized church or religious denomination shall certify its objection to a regular public high school education and shall specify, in such detail as the state board of education may reasonably require, the program of instruction that it intends to provide and no such program shall be approved unless it fully complies with standards therefor which shall be specified by the state board of education;

(8) if the sponsors of an instructional program approved under this subsection fail to comply at any time with the provisions of this subsection, the state board of education shall rescind, after a written warning has been served and a period of three weeks allowed for compliance, approval of the programs, even though the two-year approval period has not elapsed, and thereupon children attending such program shall be admitted to a high school of the school district.

(g) As used in this section:

(1) "Parent" and "person acting as parent" have the meanings respectively ascribed thereto in K.S.A. 72-1046, and amendments thereto.

(2) "Regularly enrolled" means enrolled in five or more hours of instruction each school day. For the purposes of subsection (b)(3), hours of instruction received at a postsecondary educational institution shall be counted.

History: L. 1874, ch. 123, 1; L. 1903, ch. 423, 1; L. 1919, ch. 272, 1; L. 1923, ch. 182, 1; R.S. 1923, 72-4801; L. 1965, ch. 409, 1; L. 1968, ch. 356, 1; L. 1969, ch. 316, 1; L. 1976, ch. 310, 1; L. 1980, ch. 217, 3; L. 1984, ch. 263, 1; L. 1996, ch. 229, 121; L. 1997, ch. 157, 1; Revived and Amend., L. 2004, ch. 185, 1; June 10.

Deberg_1990
08-20-2008, 08:10 PM
Personally, I say good for him. He can always get a GED and that certainly wouldn't stop him from going to college in the future.

If the kid's got talent and can win contests all over the world, I say "Why not?". What makes this any different from any child actor or teen music sensation?

If there's money to be made, go for it.


I would tend to agree but....

Whos going to tutor him on how to manage his money? His parents?? Doubtful, they couldnt even get him to stay in school.

His lawyers?
They are probably just looking to steal it all from him.

Stinger
08-20-2008, 08:16 PM
Sweet....now cut the electricity to his room and take back the game (that you more than likely bought for him). Tell him if he wants to play it.....then he can pay for it all.

Heck i would go a little further ...... Lock the fridge and charge him room and board - food service is extra.

Chief Chief
08-20-2008, 09:11 PM
If I was this kids parent. I'd call him out of the house, have his stupid little guitar hero laying on the sidewalk and unleash the fury with a big sledgehammer until he cried. Then I would kick him in the face and call him a pussy.

Oh, please PLEASE PLEASE be the keynote speaker at this weekend's Championship Father event!!!

Pitt Gorilla
08-20-2008, 09:20 PM
I would put a foot in his ass.

The Pedestrian
08-20-2008, 10:26 PM
Personally, I say good for him. He can always get a GED and that certainly wouldn't stop him from going to college in the future.

If the kid's got talent and can win contests all over the world, I say "Why not?". What makes this any different from any child actor or teen music sensation?

If there's money to be made, go for it.

He could be doing something useful for other people. Child actors and teen musicians at least use their skills to express life lessons to others, whether it's through their shows/songs or going on the classic chain of:
Disney-star---> sensation---> whorish/trashy---> constantly on the news for drugs and child-raising mishaps

thurman merman
08-20-2008, 10:26 PM
I'd smash his plastic guitar, and glue a desk too his ass.

and then tell him that going to school is important because you can learn how to spell "to"?

beach tribe
08-20-2008, 10:28 PM
and then tell him that going to school is important because you can learn how to spell "to"?

It was an accident spelling Nazi.

BTW did they execute your parents' murdering friend yet?