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View Full Version : Elections The Spectrum of Candidate Support


DaFace
09-12-2008, 06:23 PM
I know, I know...I'm only an occasional visitor to DC, but I thought I'd throw out my own little poll. Just because I'm curious. So there.

Anyway, politics is often considered a battle between two extremes. In my opinion, however, the reality is that there are people all over the spectrum that get pushed toward the ends of the political spectrum in discussion because it's seen as being wishy washy to be anywhere in between.

So, if Obama is on one end of the spectrum and McCain is on the other, where do you really stand?



I apologize for having to put one candidate on top and the other on the bottom. This is in no way meant to be a preference for one candidate over the other.

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-12-2008, 06:24 PM
Your poll is flawed if that is your methodology. I exist left of Obama but must move to the right because he is the candidate who is most able to deliver on issues that I care about, even if we still have large philosophical differences.

DaFace
09-12-2008, 06:27 PM
Your poll is flawed if that is your methodology. I exist left of Obama but must move to the right because he is the candidate who is most able to deliver on issues that I care about, even if we still have large philosophical differences.

I don't mean this to be a discussion of the political left vs. the political right. Instead, it's more a discussion of "To what extent are you sold on the idea that Candidate X is a better choice than Candidate Y?"

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-12-2008, 06:45 PM
Polarization, FTW!!

Direckshun
09-12-2008, 07:20 PM
I'm a "4" for Obama. I believe he's a phenomenal leader and he's virtually everything I ask of a candidate. He and I quibble on a few issues, and I'd like him to be more experienced, but I have no serious complaints. Biden I have worlds of respect for.

It also does not hurt that McCain has largely trashed his hard-earned reputation in my eyes, and that his pick for a running mate was reckless and foolish.

Donger
09-12-2008, 07:24 PM
I don't mean this to be a discussion of the political left vs. the political right. Instead, it's more a discussion of "To what extent are you sold on the idea that Candidate X is a better choice than Candidate Y?"

You apparently need to give Hamas the option of '10,' DaFace.

Ultra Peanut
09-12-2008, 07:36 PM
OBAMA IS MY HOMEBOY

Silock
09-12-2008, 07:37 PM
I voted 0, because I'm not voting for either of them.

Mr Luzcious
09-12-2008, 10:45 PM
I need a "completely opposed to both" option.

Mr Luzcious
09-12-2008, 10:46 PM
I know 0 could be that, but it's not quite emphatic enough.

wazu
09-12-2008, 11:09 PM
I exist left of Obama...

Left of Obama, the most liberal voter in the U.S. Senate? What issues could he possibly move to the left on? Move the top marginal rate to 100%? Allow children to be aborted any time before their second birthday?

Logical
09-12-2008, 11:15 PM
I originally planted myself defending Obama because of good people like Big Daddy (Troy) take such obnoxious positions, but with McCain's pick of Palin I definitely have shifted to slight support of Obama and unless McCain can convince me 4 more years of Bush is the right thing I not only won't vote for him but I may vote for Obama (actually maybe I should have went 2 (oh well).

wazu
09-12-2008, 11:21 PM
I originally planted myself defending Obama because of good people like Big Daddy (Troy) take such obnoxious positions, but with McCain's pick of Palin I definitely have shifted to slight support of Obama and unless McCain can convince me 4 more years of Bush is the right thing I not only won't vote for him but I may vote for Obama (actually maybe I should have went 2 (oh well).

Well, there we have it, then. Sounds like McCain might not win California.

RJ
09-12-2008, 11:31 PM
In the Pre-Palin Era I planned on voting for Obama but some sort of Obama scandal might have swayed me to MCain. Post Palin, I could only be swayed to not vote at all.

Logical
09-12-2008, 11:34 PM
Well, there we have it, then. Sounds like McCain might not win California.LOL I will give you that one.

Logical
09-12-2008, 11:36 PM
Well, there we have it, then. Sounds like McCain might not win California.Dude you only gave yourself a 3 for McCain, well I guess I can see your confusion, your hardon is for Palin not McCain.

wazu
09-13-2008, 12:24 AM
Dude you only gave yourself a 3 for McCain, well I guess I can see your confusion, your hardon is for Palin not McCain.

Believe it or not, Palin wasn't a consideration for me in this. I looked at it as a two-horse race. Obama is basically wrong about everything. McCain is wrong about half the time. I would have given McCain "5", but that just didn't seem right considering it's purely a lesser-of-two-evils pick.

For me, this election was never between Obama and McCain, it was between Barr and McCain. Palin tipped the scales.

Mr Luzcious
09-13-2008, 12:28 AM
Believe it or not, Palin wasn't a consideration for me in this. I looked at it as a two-horse race. Obama is basically wrong about everything. McCain is wrong about half the time. I would have given McCain "5", but that just didn't seem right considering it's purely a lesser-of-two-evils pick.

For me, this election was never between Obama and McCain, it was between Barr and McCain. Palin tipped the scales.

Tipped the scales towards Barr or Mccain?

wazu
09-13-2008, 12:28 AM
Tipped the scales towards Barr or Mccain?

McCain.

Reaper16
09-13-2008, 12:29 AM
OBAMA IS MY HOMEBOY
WORD

Mr Luzcious
09-13-2008, 12:31 AM
McCain.

Interesting. What is it about Palin that you like?

Logical
09-13-2008, 12:34 AM
Believe it or not, Palin wasn't a consideration for me in this. I looked at it as a two-horse race. Obama is basically wrong about everything. McCain is wrong about half the time. I would have given McCain "5", but that just didn't seem right considering it's purely a lesser-of-two-evils pick.

For me, this election was never between Obama and McCain, it was between Barr and McCain. Palin tipped the scales.Barr should probably fold up his campaign.

wazu
09-13-2008, 12:37 AM
Interesting. What is it about Palin that you like?

She's a fiscal conservative who made life hell for a lot of corrupt Republicans in Alaska. The fact that McCain has brought her onto the national stage gives me hope that we won't just be wheeling out a bunch of retread candidates in 2012. I'm hoping the 2012 Republican primary will include Palin, Jindal, and my favorite, Mark Sanford.

wazu
09-13-2008, 12:39 AM
Barr should probably fold up his campaign.

I thought he was a strange choice for the Libertarians to begin with. Still, he was saying mostly the right things, so I was leaning his way until Palin was announced.

Mr Luzcious
09-13-2008, 12:41 AM
She's a fiscal conservative who made life hell for a lot of corrupt Republicans in Alaska. The fact that McCain has brought her onto the national stage gives me hope that we won't just be wheeling out a bunch of retread candidates in 2012. I'm hoping the 2012 Republican primary will include Palin, Jindal, and my favorite, Mark Sanford.

Hm. Well, hopefully that manifests itself in actual policy if Mccain is elected. I doubt it, but it's nice to have a little hope.

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-13-2008, 12:51 AM
Left of Obama, the most liberal voter in the U.S. Senate? What issues could he possibly move to the left on? Move the top marginal rate to 100%? Allow children to be aborted any time before their second birthday?

This only proves how stupid you are.

Obama is nowhere near as liberal as say...Bernie Sanders who is a self-avowed Social Democrat, yet because the right wing tells you he's the most liberal, he is.

I forgot, John Kerry was also the most liberal member of the Senate in 2004. I'm sure that Gore was the most liberal member of the Senate in 1992.

And yes, pro-choice is pro abortion and we are all Robin Hoods. Thank you for your excellent analysis, go get yourself a noose, some ky and a Hog Farmer approved elbow length glove, so that you can hit your own g-spot while choking yourself out, working the dildo up your ass for Sarah Palin.

Logical
09-13-2008, 01:22 AM
She's a fiscal conservative who made life hell for a lot of corrupt Republicans in Alaska. The fact that McCain has brought her onto the national stage gives me hope that we won't just be wheeling out a bunch of retread candidates in 2012. I'm hoping the 2012 Republican primary will include Palin, Jindal, and my favorite, Mark Sanford.Please provide the instances where Palin in reality made life hell for corrupt Republicans. Or is this just more of the Sarah Palin myth?

BucEyedPea
09-13-2008, 06:49 AM
She's a fiscal conservative who made life hell for a lot of corrupt Republicans in Alaska. The fact that McCain has brought her onto the national stage gives me hope that we won't just be wheeling out a bunch of retread candidates in 2012. I'm hoping the 2012 Republican primary will include Palin, Jindal, and my favorite, Mark Sanford.

I wouldn't bank on it. She will be thoroughly corrupted by then. In fact she is right now spouting McCain's lines. She's already for war with Russia. McCain cannot implement a sane fiscal policy with his NC FP views. If she isn't thoroughly corrupted and tries to take on DC they will find a way to scandalize her to do away with her. Bank on it. Our answer is more pro-liberty candidates in Congress to check the WH back down to its proper powers.

BucEyedPea
09-13-2008, 06:52 AM
This only proves how stupid you are.
If this what you mean by logic?
so that you can hit your own g-spot while choking yourself out, working the dildo up your ass for Sarah Palin.
And this?

You hurt your own case here.

Obama is pretty darn liberal, just listening to the program's he wants.

Ultra Peanut
09-13-2008, 06:56 AM
WORDChoom Gang represent.

WE GO PLAY HOPE

BucEyedPea
09-13-2008, 06:58 AM
I thought he was a strange choice for the Libertarians to begin with. Still, he was saying mostly the right things, so I was leaning his way until Palin was announced.

Well, Barr and the real libertarians are already at war with one another. It wasn't just the Ds, and the Rs ( although they have covered it up better with PR) that have had disunity. the Libertarians are having their own. Barr is on record for going after Iran, into South America etc. I think he also endorsed F/F bailout. Turns out his NC VP is a buddy of Karl Rove too. He refused to attend Paul's announcement the other day advising people to vote for one of the 3rd parties including Nader or even McKinney in an effort to change the system. He promised to attend then rudely didn't show. Then one of his senior advisors publicly attacks Ron Paul on his site because Paul would not endorse Barr singularly over any of the other 3rd parties. Bad move. He lost a lot of Paul votes doing that, and he needs those votes. Some politician. Not a diplomat. A vote for any major party candidate is not a vote for change but an endorsement of the Establishment. This much is true.

DaFace
09-13-2008, 12:00 PM
Interesting results. I kinda thought that's the way people would be around here. I guess it's just the really vocal minority who are so polarized.

PRIEST
09-13-2008, 12:07 PM
Obama with a 5 McCain is old out of touch warmonger!!!!

wazu
09-13-2008, 12:23 PM
Please provide the instances where Palin in reality made life hell for corrupt Republicans. Or is this just more of the Sarah Palin myth?

If you haven't heard by now, then you just aren't paying attention.

=================================================

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122057381593001741.html?mod=todays_columnists

How Palin Beat Alaska's Establishment
By Kimberly Strassel
September 5, 2008; Page A13

http://s.wsj.net/public/resources/images/OB-CG236_oj_pw0_NS_20080904180029.jpg

If you've read the press coverage of Sarah Palin, chances are you've heard plenty about her religious views and private family matters. If you want to know what drives Gov. Palin's politics, and has intrigued America, read this.

Every state has its share of crony capitalism, but Big Oil and the GOP political machine have taken that term to new heights in Alaska. The oil industry, which provides 85% of state revenues, has strived to own the government. Alaska's politicians—in particular ruling Republicans—roll in oil campaign money, lavish oil revenue on pet projects, then retire to lucrative oil jobs where they lobby for sweetheart oil deals. You can love the free market and not love this.

Alaskans have long resented this dysfunction, which has led to embarrassing corruption scandals. It has also led to a uniform belief that the political class, in hock to the oil class, fails to competently oversee Alaska's vast oil and gas wealth, the majority of which belongs to the state—or rather, Alaskan citizens.

And so it came as no surprise in 2004 when former Republican Gov. Frank Murkowski made clear he'd be working exclusively with three North Slope producers—ExxonMobil, ConocoPhillips and BP—to build a $25 billion pipeline to move natural gas to the lower 48. The trio had informed their political vassals that they alone would build this project (they weren't selling their gas to outsiders) and that they expected the state to reward them. Mr. Murkowski disappeared into smoky backrooms to work out the details. He refused to release information on the negotiations. When Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Irwin suggested terms of the contract were illegal, he was fired.

What Mr. Murkowski did do publicly was instruct his statehouse to change the oil and gas tax structure (taxes being a primary way Alaskans realize their oil revenue). Later, citizens would discover this was groundwork for Mr. Murkowski's pipeline contract—which would lock in that oil-requested tax package for up to 40 years, provide a $4 billion state investment, and relinquish most oversight.

Enter Mrs. Palin. The former mayor of Wasilla had been appointed by Mr. Murkowski in 2003 to the state oil and gas regulatory agency. She'd had the temerity to blow the whistle on fellow GOP Commissioner Randy Ruedrich for refusing to disclose energy dealings. Mr. Murkowski and GOP Attorney General Gregg Renkes closed ranks around Mr. Ruedrich—who also chaired the state GOP. Mrs. Palin resigned. Having thus offended the entire old boy network, she challenged the governor for his seat.

Mrs. Palin ran against the secret deal, and vowed to put the pipeline back out for competitive, transparent, bidding. She railed against cozy politics. Mr. Murkowski ran on his unpopular pipeline deal. The oil industry warned the state would never get its project without his leadership. Mrs. Palin walloped him in the primary and won office in late 2006. Around this time, news broke of a federal probe that would show oil executives had bribed lawmakers to support the Murkowski tax changes.

Among Mrs. Palin's first acts was to reinstate Mr. Irwin. By February 2007 she'd released her requirements for pipeline bidding. They were stricter, and included only a $500 million state incentive. By May a cowed state house—reeling from scandal—passed her legislation.

The producers warned they would not bid, nor would anyone else. Five groups submitted proposals. A few months before the legislature awarded its license to TransCanada this July, Conoco and BP suddenly announced they'd be building their own pipeline with no state inducements whatsoever. They'd suddenly found the money.

Mrs. Palin has meanwhile passed an ethics law. She's tightened up oil oversight. She forced the legislature to rewrite the oil tax law. That new law raised taxes on the industry, for which Mrs. Palin is now taking some knocks, but the political background here is crucial.

The GOP machine has crumbled. Attorney General Renkes resigned. Mr. Ruedrich was fined $12,000. Jim Clark—Mr. Murkowski's lead pipeline negotiator—pleaded guilty to conspiring with an oil firm. At least three legislators have been convicted. Sen. Ted Stevens is under indictment for oil entanglements, while Rep. Don Young is under investigation.

Throughout it all, Mrs. Palin has stood for reform, though not populism. She thanks oil companies and says executives who "seek maximum revenue" are "simply doing their job." She says her own job is to be a "savvy" negotiator on behalf of Alaska's citizens and to provide credible oversight. It is this combination that lets her aggressively promote new energy while retaining public trust.

Today's congressional Republicans could learn from this. The party has been plagued by earmarks, scandal and corruption. Most members have embraced the machine. That has diminished voters' trust, and in the process diminished good, conservative ideas. It is no wonder 37 million people tuned in to Mrs. Palin's convention speech. They are looking for something fresh.