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View Full Version : Religion Autism vaccine whackos causing increase in Measels cases.


jidar
09-16-2008, 05:29 PM
These fruitcakes are a danger to society.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/21/us-measles-cases-highest_n_120493.html

US Measles Cases Highest In A Decade Due To Vaccination Fears

ATLANTA Measles cases in the U.S. are at the highest level in more than a decade, with nearly half of those involving children whose parents rejected vaccination, health officials reported Thursday.

Worried doctors are troubled by the trend fueled by unfounded fears that vaccines may cause autism. The number of cases is still small, just 131, but that's only for the first seven months of the year. There were only 42 cases for all of last year.

"We're seeing a lot more spread. That is concerning to us," said Dr. Jane Seward, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Pediatricians are frustrated, saying they are having to spend more time convincing parents the shot is safe.

"This year, we certainly have had parents asking more questions," said Dr. Ari Brown, an Austin, Texas, physician who is a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The CDC's review found that a number of cases involved home-schooled children not required to get the vaccines. Others can avoid vaccination by seeking exemptions, such as for religious reasons.

Measles, best known for a red skin rash, is a potentially deadly, highly infectious virus that spreads through contact with a sneezing, coughing, infected person.

It is no longer endemic to the United States, but every year cases enter the country through foreign visitors or Americans returning from abroad. Measles epidemics have exploded in Israel, Switzerland and some other countries. But high U.S. childhood vaccination rates have prevented major outbreaks here.
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In a typical year, only one outbreak occurs in the United States, infecting perhaps 10 to 20 people. So far this year through July 30 the country has seen seven outbreaks, including one in Illinois with 30 cases, said Seward, of the CDC's Division of Viral Diseases.

None of the 131 patients died, but 15 were hospitalized.

Childhood measles vaccination rates have stayed above 92 percent, according to 2006 data. However, the recent outbreaks suggest potential pockets of unvaccinated children are forming. Health officials worry that vaccination rates have begun to fall _ something that won't show up in the data for a couple of years.

The vaccine is considered highly effective but not perfect; 11 of this year's cases had at least one dose of the vaccine.

Of this year's total, 122 were unvaccinated or had unknown vaccination status. Some were unvaccinated because the children were under age 1 _ too young to get their first measles shot.

In 63 of those cases _ almost all of them 19 or under _ the patient or their parents refused the shots for philosophical or religious reasons, the CDC reported.

In Washington state, an outbreak was traced to a church conference, including 16 school-aged children who were not vaccinated. Eleven of those kids were home schooled and not subject to vaccination rules in public schools. It's unclear why the parents rejected the vaccine.

The Illinois outbreak _ triggered by a teenager who had traveled to Italy _ included 25 home-schooled children, according to the CDC report.

The nation once routinely saw hundreds of thousands of measles cases each year, and hundreds of deaths. But immunization campaigns were credited with dramatically reducing the numbers. The last time health officials saw this many cases was 1997, when 138 were reported.

The Academy of Pediatrics has made educating parents about the safety of vaccines one of its top priorities this year. That's partly because busy doctors have grown frustrated by the amount of time they're spending answering parents' questions about things they read on the Internet or heard from TV talk shows.

In June, the CDC interviewed 33 physicians in Austin, suburban Seattle and Hollywood, Fla., about childhood vaccinations. Several complained about patient backlogs caused by parents stirred up by information of dubious scientific merit, according to the CDC report.

Questions commonly center on autism and the fear that it can be caused by the measles shots or by a mercury-based preservative that used to be in most vaccines. Health officials say there is no good scientific proof either is a cause. Also, since 2001, the preservative has been removed from shots recommended for young children, and it was never in the measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. It can still be found in some flu shots.

Brown said she wrote a 16-page, single-spaced document for parents that explains childhood vaccinations and why doctors do not believe they cause autism. She began handing it out this spring, and thinks it's been a help to parents and a time-saver for her.

"People want that level of information," she said.

At least one outbreak this year of another preventable disease was blamed on lack of immunizations. At least 17 children were sick with whooping cough at a private school in the San Francisco Bay area, and 13 were not vaccinated against the disease, which can be fatal to children.

irishjayhawk
09-16-2008, 05:30 PM
Yes, they are a threat. No doubt.

ZERO science behind the vaccines linked to autism.

Chief Faithful
09-16-2008, 05:33 PM
Yes, they are a threat. No doubt.

ZERO science behind the vaccines linked to autism.

Impressive how facts never stand in your way of expressing an opinion in the loudest possible manner.

jidar
09-16-2008, 05:34 PM
Impressive how facts never stand in your way of expressing an opinion in the loudest possible manner.

What science?

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-16-2008, 05:38 PM
This is like setting off a flare for BIG_DADDY.

Chief Faithful
09-16-2008, 05:52 PM
What science?

Aren't you paying attention? irishjayhawk has already quantified the answer and I'm sure he knows, just ask him.

No reason to question those big corporations that make big money off those vaccines because you know their only motive is the public good. Thanks to those great companies children receive 82 mandatory vaccinations for terrible diseases from Chicken Pox to Cervical viruses before kindergarten in my state.

J Diddy
09-16-2008, 06:48 PM
This is like setting off a flare for BIG_DADDY.


that was the intention

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 06:53 PM
Aren't you paying attention? irishjayhawk has already quantified the answer and I'm sure he knows, just ask him.

No reason to question those big corporations that make big money off those vaccines because you know their only motive is the public good. Thanks to those great companies children receive 82 mandatory vaccinations for terrible diseases from Chicken Pox to Cervical viruses before kindergarten in my state.

Similiar to almost every drug being introduced nowadays, it will cure a cold sore or make it "manageable" but side effects cause blindness, stomach ulcers, internal bleeding, coma, death etc. Never a cure only a way to manage what ails you, have to keep those funds rolling in.

Earthling
09-16-2008, 06:54 PM
Dang..Measles is NOT a life threatening thing. Has anyone on this board NOT had measles?

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 06:55 PM
Dang..Measles is NOT a life threatening thing. Has anyone on this board NOT had measles?

Vaccinated and had measles i almost died from boredom.

RJ
09-16-2008, 06:58 PM
A kid in my daughter's kindergarten class has chicken pox. I haven't heard of a kid with chicken pox in years. Rumor has it the child's parents opted out of vaccinations. Great, and risk the health of other children and their families. As far as I'm concerned, without a valid medical reason, if you don't want your kid vaccinated then you need to home school.

***SPRAYER
09-16-2008, 07:00 PM
Aren't you paying attention? irishjayhawk has already quantified the answer and I'm sure he knows, just ask him.

No reason to question those big corporations that make big money off those vaccines because you know their only motive is the public good. Thanks to those great companies children receive 82 mandatory vaccinations for terrible diseases from Chicken Pox to Cervical viruses before kindergarten in my state.


If this stuff bothers you, don't join the military. You get a 21 gun salute within 48 hrs after showing up for boot camp.

J Diddy
09-16-2008, 07:01 PM
Dang..Measles is NOT a life threatening thing. Has anyone on this board NOT had measles?

nope I got vaccinated

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-16-2008, 07:03 PM
A kid in my daughter's kindergarten class has chicken pox. I haven't heard of a kid with chicken pox in years. Rumor has it the child's parents opted out of vaccinations. Great, and risk the health of other children and their families. As far as I'm concerned, without a valid medical reason, if you don't want your kid vaccinated then you need to home school.

To me, that's interesting. When I was a kindergartner (20 years ago), we all had MMR and no chicken pox vaccine. In fact, I got chicken pox when I was 3. I didn't even have to get a Hep B vaccine until I started college.

I didn't realize all kids got the chicken pox vaccine. I figured that was one of those necessary evils, but I guess it is cheaper than taking a week off of work to care for them :shrug:

***SPRAYER
09-16-2008, 07:05 PM
To me, that's interesting. When I was a kindergartner (20 years ago), we all had MMR and no chicken pox vaccine. In fact, I got chicken pox when I was 3. I didn't even have to get a Hep B vaccine until I started college.

I didn't realize all kids got the chicken pox vaccine. I figured that was one of those necessary evils, but I guess it is cheaper than taking a week off of work to care for them :shrug:


I had chicken pox too, when I was a kid. I still have a remaining scar from where I picked at a scab.

wazu
09-16-2008, 07:07 PM
I have a friend who had a happy, talking 18 month old kid, and literally the day she got the MMR vaccine she got sick for several days, withdrew from interacting with her sister and parents, and never came back. She was eventually diagnosed with autism. When my friend told me about all of this it was years ago, and the controversy had not yet erupted to the point of everybody having heard of it. He was merely reporting his observations, and was not pursuing any kind of law suit or anything. All his energy was going to trying to figure out how to help his daughter

Now of course none of this scientifically proved a cause-effect relationship. But the mere possibility was enough for my wife and I to hold off on getting our kids the vaccine until they were school age and it was required. By then, mercury had been removed from the vaccine. We also held off on chicken pox until school age. Our feeling was we'd rather risk an illness that people have survived for generations, than inject something into them at such a young age that might cause something so awful. It's a tough choice, but ultimately was easier to live with for us.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 07:09 PM
A kid in my daughter's kindergarten class has chicken pox. I haven't heard of a kid with chicken pox in years. Rumor has it the child's parents opted out of vaccinations. Great, and risk the health of other children and their families. As far as I'm concerned, without a valid medical reason, if you don't want your kid vaccinated then you need to home school.

Logically if your child has been vaccinated then you have nothing to worry about? or does the vaccine not work?

Earthling
09-16-2008, 07:10 PM
On a side note, my 13 year old daughter just got vacincated against cervical cancer! I had no idea they could even vacinate for that.
And, back on track, I don't think they even had measles vacine when I was a youngin'.

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-16-2008, 07:11 PM
I had chicken pox too, when I was a kid. I still have a remaining scar from where I picked at a scab.

I had one pock mark on my forehead, but as I got older it faded away.

'Hamas' Jenkins
09-16-2008, 07:11 PM
On a side note, my 13 year old daughter just got vacincated against cervical cancer! I had no idea they could even vacinate for that.
And, back on track, I don't think they even had measles vacine when I was a youngin'.

One of my cousins actually asked her mom for Gardasil. My mom was scandalized by that, thinking that she was off to do some ****in' ROFL

Earthling
09-16-2008, 07:15 PM
One of my cousins actually asked her mom for Gardasil. My mom was scandalized by that, thinking that she was off to do some ****in' ROFL

:D

J Diddy
09-16-2008, 07:24 PM
I had chicken pox too, when I was a kid. I still have a remaining scar from where I picked at a scab.

I got chicken pox too, whole block had a chicken pox party just to get it out of the way.

Chiefnj2
09-16-2008, 07:29 PM
15 hospitalizations. I wonder how many kids were vaccinated and suffered any type of reaction that led to a hospitalization.

Ultra Peanut
09-16-2008, 08:36 PM
Aren't you paying attention? irishjayhawk has already quantified the answer and I'm sure he knows, just ask him.

No reason to question those big corporations that make big money off those vaccines because you know their only motive is the public good. Thanks to those great companies children receive 82 mandatory vaccinations for terrible diseases from Chicken Pox to Cervical viruses before kindergarten in my state.Yes, aside from the complete lack of evidence after it's been studied, it's totally a matter that's up for debate.

Pitt Gorilla
09-16-2008, 08:40 PM
Study after study shows no link between MMR and autism. I'm not sure the evidence could be any clearer.

Ultra Peanut
09-16-2008, 08:42 PM
Study after study shows no link between MMR and autism. I'm not sure the evidence could be any clearer.SO YOU'RE SAYING THERE'S A CHANCE

RJ
09-16-2008, 09:13 PM
Logically if your child has been vaccinated then you have nothing to worry about? or does the vaccine not work?


No, it works quite well. The bigger danger is that the vaccinated child can still carry the virus, exposing other household members- infants, old folks, pregnant mothers, etc.

I had chicken pox and measles and mumps as a child and probably a few things I've forgotten. I see no reason for kids today to get the same illnesses when they're preventable. Nothing I've read about today's vaccines makes me think I was endangering my daughter by giving them to her. And believe me, I am very protective of that child.

RJ
09-16-2008, 09:18 PM
To me, that's interesting. When I was a kindergartner (20 years ago), we all had MMR and no chicken pox vaccine. In fact, I got chicken pox when I was 3. I didn't even have to get a Hep B vaccine until I started college.

I didn't realize all kids got the chicken pox vaccine. I figured that was one of those necessary evils, but I guess it is cheaper than taking a week off of work to care for them :shrug:



Assuming that, without vaccination, virtually every kid would get chicken pox - that's the way it was when I was a kid - think about that in terms of productivity and medical costs. Now add measles and mumps. That's a lot of sick kids. Doctor visits, emergency rooms, missed work days, missed school days.

And, it's worth pointing out, that crap was miserable for a kid.

tiptap
09-16-2008, 09:20 PM
And the deaths associated with all of these diseases.

RJ
09-16-2008, 09:24 PM
And the deaths associated with all of these diseases.



Yes, and then there's that.

Mecca
09-16-2008, 09:25 PM
I have a friend who had a happy, talking 18 month old kid, and literally the day she got the MMR vaccine she got sick for several days, withdrew from interacting with her sister and parents, and never came back. She was eventually diagnosed with autism. When my friend told me about all of this it was years ago, and the controversy had not yet erupted to the point of everybody having heard of it. He was merely reporting his observations, and was not pursuing any kind of law suit or anything. All his energy was going to trying to figure out how to help his daughter

Now of course none of this scientifically proved a cause-effect relationship. But the mere possibility was enough for my wife and I to hold off on getting our kids the vaccine until they were school age and it was required. By then, mercury had been removed from the vaccine. We also held off on chicken pox until school age. Our feeling was we'd rather risk an illness that people have survived for generations, than inject something into them at such a young age that might cause something so awful. It's a tough choice, but ultimately was easier to live with for us.

It's nice to know you are friend with Jenny McCarthy.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 09:38 PM
No, it works quite well. The bigger danger is that the vaccinated child can still carry the virus, exposing other household members- infants, old folks, pregnant mothers, etc.

I had chicken pox and measles and mumps as a child and probably a few things I've forgotten. I see no reason for kids today to get the same illnesses when they're preventable. Nothing I've read about today's vaccines makes me think I was endangering my daughter by giving them to her. And believe me, I am very protective of that child.

Ok then having had Measles myself, after being vaccinated do i still carry the virus?

irishjayhawk
09-16-2008, 09:52 PM
Ok then having had Measles myself, after being vaccinated do i still carry the virus?

Technically, vaccines are the virus.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:01 PM
Technically, vaccines are the virus.

supposedly the dead virus. I was simply trying to point out that if i had Measles, and was vaccinated before getting them wouldn't I be infecting all the people i came into contact with since the age of 7?

irishjayhawk
09-16-2008, 10:02 PM
supposedly the dead virus. I was simply trying to point out that if i had Measles, and was vaccinated before getting them wouldn't I be infecting all the people i came into contact with since the age of 7?

You had them after you got vaccinated or before?

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:04 PM
You had them after you got vaccinated or before?

after.

irishjayhawk
09-16-2008, 10:04 PM
after.

So the vaccination didn't work, correct?

RJ
09-16-2008, 10:06 PM
Ok then having had Measles myself, after being vaccinated do i still carry the virus?


I don't understand the question. You had measles and then were vaccinated? Isn't that closing the barn door after the horse got out?

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:06 PM
So the vaccination didn't work, correct?

I'm guessing that is the case, unless i simply had the vaccine for the pleasure of it.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:09 PM
I don't understand the question. You had measles and then were vaccinated? Isn't that closing the barn door after the horse got out?

I was trying to apply the logic you posted that your child/grandchild was at risk even though she was vaccinated. You then pointed out that an unvaccinated person could still carry the virus and pass it on as an epidemic. My point is since i was vaccinated at 18 mos, then got measles at the age of 7 am i still carrying around an infectious disease?

J Diddy
09-16-2008, 10:12 PM
I was trying to apply the logic you posted that your child/grandchild was at risk even though she was vaccinated. You then pointed out that an unvaccinated person could still carry the virus and pass it on as an epidemic. My point is since i was vaccinated at 18 mos, then got measles at the age of 7 am i still carrying around an infectious disease?


Holy shit

that gives new meaning to "killer clown"

RJ
09-16-2008, 10:20 PM
I was trying to apply the logic you posted that your child/grandchild was at risk even though she was vaccinated. You then pointed out that an unvaccinated person could still carry the virus and pass it on as an epidemic. My point is since i was vaccinated at 18 mos, then got measles at the age of 7 am i still carrying around an infectious disease?


Yes. You might consider setting yourself on fire so as to minimize public risk.

I don't think my child is at risk.

I think potentially others may be.

I think that if someone doesn't want their child vaccinated that is their business. I also think they should have to opt for home school. If a child shows up for school obviously ill the school will send the child home, not just for the child's sake but for the sake of the classmates.

I don't care if you don't wear a seat belt but I do care if you run red lights.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:20 PM
Holy shit

that gives new meaning to "killer clown"

Very Funny.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-16-2008, 10:22 PM
Yes. You might consider setting yourself on fire so as to minimize public risk.

I don't think my child is at risk.

I think potentially others may be.

I think that if someone doesn't want their child vaccinated that is their business. I also think they should have to opt for home school. If a child shows up for school obviously ill the school will send the child home, not just for the child's sake but for the sake of the classmates.

I don't care if you don't wear a seat belt but I do care if you run red lights.

I'm with you on the sick kids going to school thing, I NEVER send my son to school sick, but plenty of other parents do. I become very irratated hearing some of the parents talk like their careers are more important than their children.

RJ
09-16-2008, 10:28 PM
I'm with you on the sick kids going to school thing, I NEVER send my son to school sick, but plenty of other parents do. I become very irratated hearing some of the parents talk like their careers are more important than their children.


That drives me nuts. Seeing kids in school hacking and sneezing, snot running down their nose. The au-thor-o-ties in my daughter's school tell me we won't see that and I hope it is true. Take a day off and stay home with your kid!