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KILLER_CLOWN
09-18-2008, 06:38 PM
Ron Paul Blasts “Secret Government” Running Economy

Congressman warns middle class in danger of being wiped out, says Congress is oblivious and Fed has no clue



Steve Watson
Infowars.net
Thursday, Sept 18, 2008

Congressman Ron Paul has issued a stinging address concerning the financial crisis in which he outlines how the current economic problems, created via malinvestment and shift to a debt based economy, are now being mismanaged by private interests in secret.

What’s more he says he is not sure the Federal Reserve has any idea what to do next and that the Congress is totally oblivious to the whole sorry state of affairs - a cocktail of elements he warns puts the middle class of America in serious jeopardy.

“Today we had a lot of financial fireworks in the markets, a lot of things are going on, and I think we are in the middle of something very big.” the Congressman stated.

Speaking on the recent collapse and government bailout of several big financial institutions he warned:

“We’re talking about big bucks, we’re not talking about hundreds of millions or even hundreds of billions, we’re talking about trillions of dollars, the obligation is immeasurable.”

“The interesting thing is that they (the financial institutions) don’t come to the Congress, I mean the Federal Reserve buys them out, they own it. We as tax payers now own Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and know one knows how much that will cost. They don’t come to the Congress, we don’t have appropriations, it’s done by secret government, private individuals behind the scenes maneuvering and manipulating and trying to patch things up. While in the meantime, I’m sure there’s a few people making a couple of bucks out of this whole thing.”


The Congressman highlighted how an economy structured on debt and credit and a financial system based on interventionism and self serving moral hazard has led to gross devaluation of the dollar and ultimately lies at the root of the current financial meltdown.

“Our problems come first of all from the Federal Reserve. It is a monopoly and it controls interest rates artificially low, causes people to make mistakes, that’s the basic source. But then on top of that in the Housing market we had the community reinvestment act which told investors that they had to loan to risky borrowers, and that was a risky complication. HUD contributes to this, FDIC contributes, it’s called moral hazard, everything that we have done over here creates moral hazard, that is we assure people or assume that we will take care of everybody, just go out and create the risk, it is the opposite of the market place.” Paul stated.

“You can’t create money like we’re doing in order to support the dollar, because ultimately it hurts the dollar and everything we do in Washington today whether its on the appropriations side, whether it’s what the Fed is doing, buying up America, it’s all putting pressure on the dollar. One of these days we’re just going to have to wake up and say that we need to liquidate debt. This is malinvestment.” he urged.

The Congressman then slammed those who have blamed the crisis on failures of the free market:

“And then they have people come along and say ’see, this is the failure of capitalism’, this has nothing to do with capitalism, this is something that started off as interventionism and us being too involved in the economy for the benefit of special interests. But now it is being socialized out in the open.”

“The end of this comes when people reject the dollar and I think we’re getting awfully close to this.” Paul stated echoing comments from leading investors such as Jim Rogers, who predicted Monday that the dollar would soon lose its world reserve status.

“When you see the movement in the markets that we have today, you know that there are serious problems out there and Congress basically are oblivious, they have no idea what’s going on.” Paul continued.

“As a matter of fact I’m not even sure the Federal Reserve has any idea what to do about this. They’ve been manipulating and maneuvering for their own benefit over the years but eventually the market wins out.”

The Congressman’s comments were echoed today by reports indicating that the Congress cannot agree on any form of action and is likely to simply adjourn and “get out of the way”.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told reporters that “no one knows what to do”.

In a stark warning, Ron Paul stressed that the longer the value of the dollar is allowed to depreciate, the greater the risk becomes for the majority of Americans:

“The reason this is so important is that if you care about people in a humanitarian sense, what you want to do is protect the value of the money. Just think of the third world nations when they have total run away inflation, the middle class gets wiped out. And what we are seeing today is the middle class being jeopardized by this type of system that we have, unlimited spending, unlimited debt, unlimited creation of new credit.”

“So it’s time that we wake up… The answers are in the free market, sound money and our Constitution.” Paul concluded.

Watch the full address by the Congressman:

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MahiMike
09-18-2008, 06:52 PM
I don't know whether to cheer this guy on or be very afraid of him.

Bootlegged
09-18-2008, 07:01 PM
Go Teh ROhnPahl!!@!!

Ari Chi3fs
09-18-2008, 07:19 PM
I have known about this shit since Feb 2001. He who controls the money, controls the world...

If you don't believe that the Committee of 300, the Trilateral Commission, the Bilderbergs and other covert people are running things, you are mistaken.

Create a problem.
Wait for reaction.
Offer the solution.

Classic.

Bootlegged
09-18-2008, 07:26 PM
I have known about this shit since Feb 2001. He who controls the money, controls the world...

If you don't believe that the Committee of 300, the Trilateral Commission, the Bilderbergs and other covert people are running things, you are mistaken.

Create a problem.
Wait for reaction.
Offer the solution.

Classic.

ROFL

Silock
09-18-2008, 07:37 PM
In before "CAPITALISM IS DEAD" and "RON PAUL IS BATSHIT INSANE."

KILLER_CLOWN
09-18-2008, 07:57 PM
Up To 500 Bank Closures Could Absorb FDIC Funds

Patterson warns of 20-25 per cent chance of new great depression this year

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet
Thursday, September 18, 2008

Mark Patterson, chairman of private equity fund MattlinPatterson, told an audience of financial experts at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria this week that the U.S. could suffer up to 500 bank closures and that the chances of a new great depression are now as high as 25 per cent.

Financial conditions are “probably more challenging than at any time since 1929,” Patterson said, speaking at Dow Jones’ Private Equity Analyst Conference this week.

“We’re not in normal times. If you don’t accept that there is at least a 20 to 25 percent chance of a financial markets led depression you’re fooling yourself,” he cautioned, adding that “Saharan-like” credit markets are overwhelming companies.


Following the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Patterson warned that 300 to 500 U.S. banks are set to fail over the next three years and as a result absorb all of the FDIC’s pool of funds.

As we reported on Monday, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., which guarantees individual accounts up to $100,000, only has about $50 billion to “insure” about $1 trillion in assets across the nation’s financial institutions.

This has led top economists like Nouriel Roubini, of NYU’s Stern School and RGE Monitor, to openly warn that a “slow motion run on the banks” is already occurring nationwide as individuals move their deposits to safer havens.

Patterson put the figure at 300-500 bank failures presuming that other well known investment banks survive, something he said “was not such a good assumption.”

“Who could blame him for such a negative outlook?” writes Marc Raybin of HedgeFund.net. “The markets are still reeling from the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeting more than 500 points on Monday on the one-two-three punch of Lehman Bros. declaring bankruptcy, Merrill Lynch being acquired by Bank of America and American International Group, the world’s largest insurer with $1 trillion on its balance sheet, on the verge of filing for bankruptcy protection itself.”

http://www.prisonplanet.com/up-to-500-bank-closures-could-absorb-fdic-funds.html

KILLER_CLOWN
09-18-2008, 08:26 PM
Vicente Fox Tells American Workers To “Get Over It”

You Tube
Thursday, September 18, 2008

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That should help.


An interview with EX president of Mexico Vicente Fox at Wayne State University September 12, 2008 where he tells American workers to “get over it”, that their jobs are gone forever and that they must retrain for GLOBAL work. The news report also calmly mentions that he wants a North American Union (you know, that thing that doesn’t exist) and a single Amero currency - before moving on to the weather and a segment about owning a horse.

Mr. Flopnuts
09-18-2008, 08:39 PM
I have known about this shit since Feb 2001. He who controls the money, controls the world...

If you don't believe that the Committee of 300, the Trilateral Commission, the Bilderbergs and other covert people are running things, you are mistaken.

Create a problem.
Wait for reaction.
Offer the solution.

Classic.

I've always liked you Ari. Always. But today, you told me you weren't a sheep and now I like you a whole lot more.

Mr. Flopnuts
09-18-2008, 08:39 PM
ROFL

And you just told me you are. Enjoy your Arbys.

Mr. Flopnuts
09-18-2008, 08:42 PM
How much more obvious could it be? Really? Why not lock the ****ing rates in for homeowners and end all of this "futures" wizardry? No. Let's instead bail out the same ****ing people who've had 1 arm around us while the other is in our back pockets for the last 7 decades. Brilliant.

banyon
09-18-2008, 09:04 PM
I agree with about everything he says in this piece.

It's a shame neither of the candidates could sound even 1/4 this knowledgeable about these problems.

Friendo
09-18-2008, 09:12 PM
I heard nothing I disagree with.

SBK
09-18-2008, 09:13 PM
There's a definite huge transfer of wealth going on behind the scenes.

Friendo
09-18-2008, 09:49 PM
There's a definite huge transfer of wealth going on behind the scenes.

Inequality of wealth and income

Marriner S. Eccles, who served as Franklin D. Roosevelt's Chairman of the Federal Reserve from November 1934 to February 1948, detailed what he believed caused the Depression in his memoirs, Beckoning Frontiers (New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1951)[21]:

As mass production has to be accompanied by mass consumption, mass consumption, in turn, implies a distribution of wealth -- not of existing wealth, but of wealth as it is currently produced -- to provide men with buying power equal to the amount of goods and services offered by the nation's economic machinery. [Emphasis in original.] Instead of achieving that kind of distribution, a giant suction pump had by 1929-30 drawn into a few hands an increasing portion of currently produced wealth. This served them as capital accumulations. But by taking purchasing power out of the hands of mass consumers, the savers denied to themselves the kind of effective demand for their products that would justify a reinvestment of their capital accumulations in new plants. In consequence, as in a poker game where the chips were concentrated in fewer and fewer hands, the other fellows could stay in the game only by borrowing. When their credit ran out, the game stopped. That is what happened to us in the twenties. We sustained high levels of employment in that period with the aid of an exceptional expansion of debt outside of the banking system. This debt was provided by the large growth of business savings as well as savings by individuals, particularly in the upper-income groups where taxes were relatively low. Private debt outside of the banking system increased about fifty per cent. This debt, which was at high interest rates, largely took the form of mortgage debt on housing, office, and hotel structures, consumer installment debt, brokers' loans, and foreign debt. The stimulation to spending by debt-creation of this sort was short-lived and could not be counted on to sustain high levels of employment for long periods of time. Had there been a better distribution of the current income from the national product -- in other words, had there been less savings by business and the higher-income groups and more income in the lower groups -- we should have had far greater stability in our economy. Had the six billion dollars, for instance, that were loaned by corporations and wealthy individuals for stock-market speculation been distributed to the public as lower prices or higher wages and with less profits to the corporations and the well-to-do, it would have prevented or greatly moderated the economic collapse that began at the end of 1929. The time came when there were no more poker chips to be loaned on credit. Debtors thereupon were forced to curtail their consumption in an effort to create a margin that could be applied to the reduction of outstanding debts. This naturally reduced the demand for goods of all kinds and brought on what seemed to be overproduction, but was in reality underconsumption when judged in terms of the real world instead of the money world. This, in turn, brought about a fall in prices and employment. Unemployment further decreased the consumption of goods, which further increased unemployment, thus closing the circle in a continuing decline of prices. Earnings began to disappear, requiring economies of all kinds in the wages, salaries, and time of those employed. And thus again the vicious circle of deflation was closed until one third of the entire working population was unemployed, with our national income reduced by fifty per cent, and with the aggregate debt burden greater than ever before, not in dollars, but measured by current values and income that represented the ability to pay. Fixed charges, such as taxes, railroad and other utility rates, insurance and interest charges, clung close to the 1929 level and required such a portion of the national income to meet them that the amount left for consumption of goods was not sufficient to support the population. This then, was my reading of what brought on the depression.

we're headed for the shitter

KILLER_CLOWN
09-18-2008, 10:11 PM
It's also interesting to note that most of the US was self sufficient or rural during the great depression and some claim that up to 8 million Americans died. In contrast to todays US where the population is 80% urban and almost that whole percentage is not self sufficient. This becomes even more critical with the World health organisations claims of food shortages today.

Ari Chi3fs
09-18-2008, 10:14 PM
Nathan Rothschild invented this shit back when Napoleon escaped from Exile and he got his troops back together. The House of Rothschild nearly backed Napoleon, but opted against.

Panic ensued on the Stock markets and Rothschild sold sold sold... until the point of Europe economic panic... then bought at ridiculously low prices and ended up owning about 85% of Englands commercial companies.

Interesting situation... Rinse and repeat.

Its EXACTLY what these large hedge funds have been doing these past couple weeks, with the naked puts and naked short selling. I'm glad they finally put an end to that yesterday.

As long as we have fiat currency, this shit will always continue.

Attached is some Rothschild dynasty history for those uninformed.

Ari Chi3fs
09-18-2008, 10:30 PM
The Creature from Jekyll Island .torrent (http://isohunt.com/download/49588296/jekyll+island.torrent)

http://www.amazon.com/Creature-Jekyll-Island-Federal-Reserve/dp/0912986212

"A superb analysis deserving serious attention by all Americans. Be prepared for one heck of a journey through time and mind."
Ron Paul

Howlin Wolf
09-18-2008, 10:54 PM
it's the zionist cartel of rich white oilmen in cohoots with the masons who have the support of the skull and bones guys. makes you want to hang yourself with your Che t-shirt doesn't it?

SNR
09-18-2008, 11:18 PM
it's the zionist cartel of rich white oilmen in cohoots with the masons who have the support of the skull and bones guys. makes you want to hang yourself with your Che t-shirt doesn't it?People still wear those things? :spock:

CHIEF4EVER
09-18-2008, 11:26 PM
“And then they have people come along and say ’see, this is the failure of capitalism’, this has nothing to do with capitalism, this is something that started off as interventionism and us being too involved in the economy for the benefit of special interests. But now it is being socialized out in the open.”

QFT :clap:

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 07:29 AM
I'll address this from a much more objective position when I get back in about 45 minutes.

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 08:26 AM
Ron Paul hits on a great many issues that led up to the event we are seeing unfold. However, I think he misses something critical. Hedge funds and other unregulated financial institutions are obviously colluding to destroy our banking system. It took a lot more work six months ago. Now all they have to do is create a spike in short selling and investors will run for the hills. It is rational to buy when stocks go ridiculously low. But now, no one will. Why? Because of what happened to Bear and Lehman. They got killed by these massive unmonitored financial institutions colluding. This exacerbated the issues Dr. Paul addresses, imo. There should be a full-scale investigation into the these four events: Lehman, Bear, Goldman-Sachs, and Merill Lynch. Those entities that colluded should be sued to shit by the four entities above and by their investors. The heads of those entities should be locked away and prosecuted for violating anti-trust laws. JMO.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-19-2008, 08:46 AM
Ron Paul hits on a great many issues that led up to the event we are seeing unfold. However, I think he misses something critical. Hedge funds and other unregulated financial institutions are obviously colluding to destroy our banking system. It took a lot more work six months ago. Now all they have to do is create a spike in short selling and investors will run for the hills. It is rational to buy when stocks go ridiculously low. But now, no one will. Why? Because of what happened to Bear and Lehman. They got killed by these massive unmonitored financial institutions colluding. This exacerbated the issues Dr. Paul addresses, imo. There should be a full-scale investigation into the these four events: Lehman, Bear, Goldman-Sachs, and Merill Lynch. Those entities that colluded should be sued to shit by the four entities above and by their investors. The heads of those entities should be locked away and prosecuted for violating anti-trust laws. JMO.


Ok who has the power to investigate and prosecute them?

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 08:50 AM
Ok who has the power to investigate and prosecute them?

Presumably the SEC, with mandate from congress.

KILLER_CLOWN
09-19-2008, 08:52 AM
Presumably the SEC, with mandate from congress.

The atmosphere in congress prohibits this from happening, I don't see any way this would happen or happen justly.

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 09:09 AM
The atmosphere in congress prohibits this from happening, I don't see any way this would happen or happen justly.

How do you figure? I should think that if there was a bill to investigate and you voted against it, you would lose your office. Bush would certainly not veto it.

Mr. Flopnuts
09-19-2008, 09:55 AM
If this doesn't make your blood boil, you're a ****ing communist.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26787984?GT1=43001

Paulson: Rescue to cost ‘hundreds of billions’
Treasury Secretary says handling banks’ bad assets costly, but needed

Matthew Cavanaugh / EPA
Treasury Secretary Paulson on Friday sketched out a multi-faceted effort to confront the worst U.S. financial crisis in decades, outlining a program that could cost taxpayers ‘hundreds of billions.’
View related photos Video


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Sept. 19: Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson tells Americans ‘we must now take further decisive action’ to address the root cause of the financial crisis.
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Sept. 19: President Bush calls for Congress to work with Treasury and White House officials for a speedy and thorough resolution to the root cause of the financial crisis.
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updated 1 minute ago
WASHINGTON - Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson on Friday sketched out a multi-faceted effort to confront the worst U.S. financial crisis in decades, outlining a program that could cost taxpayers “hundreds of billions” of dollars to buy up bad mortgages and other toxic debt that has unhinged Wall Street.

“This needs to be big enough to make a real difference and get to the heart of the problem,” he told reporters as the administration asked Congress to give it sweeping powers.

He gave few details but said he would work through the weekend with leaders of Congress from both parties to flesh out the program, the biggest proposed government intervention in financial markets since the Great Depression.

Story continues below ↓
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The government steps were clearly welcomed by financial markets. As Paulson spoke, the Dow Jones industrials were up over 300 points and at one point had soared by 450 points.

Before the markets opened, the government announced plans to temporarily insure money-market deposits and to block short-selling in financial securities. Short selling is a trading method that bets the stocks will go down.

Speaking to reporters at the Treasury Department, Paulson said that the new troubled-asset relief program that he wants Congress to enact must be large enough to have the necessary impact while protecting taxpayers as much as possible.

“I am convinced that this bold approach will cost American families far less than the alternative — a continuing series of financial institution failures and frozen credit markets unable to fund economic expansion,” Paulson said in a prepared statement.

“The financial security of all Americans ... depends on our ability to restore our financial institutions to a sound footing,” Paulson said.

Paulson said mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will step up their purchases of mortgage-backed securities to help provide support to the crippled housing market.

He also said Friday that the Treasury Department will expand a program, announced earlier this month, to buy mortgage-backed securities, which have been badly hurt by the housing and credit crisis. Video

U.S. drafts economy rescue plan
Sept. 19: The government is stepping in to help the troubled economy, drafting a $500 billion bailout plan to help troubled banks. CNBC’s Trish Regan reports.
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“As we all know, lax lending practices earlier this decade led to irresponsible lending and irresponsible borrowing. This simply put too many families into mortgages they could not afford,” Paulson said.

At a news conference in which he only took three questions, Paulson was asked the approximate dollar size of the government intervention. “We’re talking hundreds of billions,” he said.

Paulson did not address specifics about the plan to buy back bad debt or whether the government would take a direct stake in troubled banks in exchange for its help.

“These illiquid assets are clogging up our financial system, and undermining the strength of our otherwise sound financial institutions. As a result, Americans’ personal savings are threatened, and the ability of consumers and businesses to borrow and finance spending, investment, and job creation has been disrupted,” Paulson said.

He said that the administration would present Congress with a proposed legislative package and then work with lawmakers “to flesh out the details through the weekend. And we’re going to be asking them to take action on legislation next week.”

“This is what we need to do. Because for some time we’ve been saying that the root cause of the problems in our economy and our financial system is housing, and until we get stability in the housing market we are not going to get stability in our financial markets,” he said.

Earlier, President Bush authorized Treasury to tap up to $50 billion from a Depression-era fund to insure the holdings of eligible money market mutual funds. And the Federal Reserve announced it will expand its emergency lending program to help support the $2 trillion in assets of the funds.

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Both moves are designed to bolster the huge money market mutual fund industry, which has come under stress in recent days.

The Fed said it is expanding its emergency lending efforts to allow commercial banks to finance purchases of asset-backed paper from money market funds. The central bank’s move should help the funds meet demands for redemptions.

The Securities and Exchange Commission early Friday imposed a temporary emergency ban on short-selling of financial company stocks. As the financial crisis widened, entreaties had come from all quarters to stem a swarm of short-selling contributing to the collapse of stock values in investment and commercial banks.

Congressional leaders said they expected to get the rescue plan Friday and act on it before Congress recesses for the election.

The government’s actions could help alleviate the uncertainty that has been sending the markets into tumult over the past week. Lending has ground to a virtual standstill in the wake of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.

Global stock markets roared higher, too.

And European Central Bank, Swiss National Bank and Bank of England offered up more cash Friday. The three banks put a combined $90 billion into money markets in a lockstep move.

The chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, Chris Dodd, D-Conn., warned the United States could be “days away from a complete meltdown of our financial system” and said Congress is working quickly to prevent that.

Dodd told ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Friday that the nation’s credit is seizing up and people can’t get loans.


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The ranking Republican on the Banking Committee, Sen. Richard Shelby, said the U.S. has “been lurching from one crisis to another” and predicted the new bailout plan would cost at least half a trillion dollars.

“We hope to move very quickly. Time is of the essence,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said after Paulson and Bernanke briefed congressional leaders Thursday night.

The federal government already has pledged more than $600 billion in the past year to bail out, or help bail out, some of the biggest names in American finance.

SNR
09-19-2008, 10:06 AM
QFT :clap:But... but.. but... Bush deregulates everything. He's a regular anarcho-capitalist, which will put into power the greedy corrupt corporations and take power away from normal workers! [/obama fanz]

SNR
09-19-2008, 10:11 AM
Here's a picture of Ron Paul's closest associate in economics. He doesn't have any interviews with the press because he's too busy drinking the milkshakes of working class Americans.

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/images/therewillbebloodsundayranch3.JPG

Stewie
09-19-2008, 02:49 PM
You ain't seen nothin' yet!

This is so important a topic, that it deserves top billing!!! Hidden inside the AIG bailout funding package, surely hastily cobbled together, but carefully enough to include a totally corrupt clause, was a handy dandy clause that permits raids. The conglomerate financial firms are permitted at this point to use private individual brokerage account funds to relieve their own liquidity pressures.

That right there is ****ed up.

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 02:59 PM
You ain't seen nothin' yet!

This is so important a topic, that it deserves top billing!!! Hidden inside the AIG bailout funding package, surely hastily cobbled together, but carefully enough to include a totally corrupt clause, was a handy dandy clause that permits raids. The conglomerate financial firms are permitted at this point to use private individual brokerage account funds to relieve their own liquidity pressures.

That right there is ****ed up.


Ho-ly shit.

BIG_DADDY
09-19-2008, 03:02 PM
You ain't seen nothin' yet!

This is so important a topic, that it deserves top billing!!! Hidden inside the AIG bailout funding package, surely hastily cobbled together, but carefully enough to include a totally corrupt clause, was a handy dandy clause that permits raids. The conglomerate financial firms are permitted at this point to use private individual brokerage account funds to relieve their own liquidity pressures.

That right there is ****ed up.


The perfect storm?

Stewie
09-19-2008, 03:16 PM
The perfect storm?

Who knows? A whipsaw market isn't a good thing no matter how much CNBC tells you AIG was up 40%+. When was the last time a DOW component was worth $3?! This is insane.

The big banks will sell you down the road to save their asses. I think it may be coming to that and that clause shows it.

I'm keeping my eyes peeled and protecting what I have.

Hydrae
09-19-2008, 04:05 PM
Who knows? A whipsaw market isn't a good thing no matter how much CNBC tells you AIG was up 40%+. When was the last time a DOW component was worth $3?! This is insane.

The big banks will sell you down the road to save their asses. I think it may be coming to that and that clause shows it.

I'm keeping my eyes peeled and protecting what I have.

Pretty sure I saws a mention that AIG is not part of the Dow Jones average figure as of 2 or 3 days ago. It was replaced by Kraft. So even if AIG did tank, the average that is reported to everyone would not reflect it.

Stewie
09-19-2008, 04:10 PM
Pretty sure I saws a mention that AIG is not part of the Dow Jones average figure as of 2 or 3 days ago. It was replaced by Kraft. So even if AIG did tank, the average that is reported to everyone would not reflect it.

AIG still shows up on the DOW, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was substituted. You can't make things look bad, now can you? All is well! What was good yesterday is shit today! Kraft, instead of the "formerly" biggest insurance company in the world? Buy CHEESE!... that gives us a better bottom line. UGH!!!!

memyselfI
09-19-2008, 04:12 PM
I wish he was going to be on the ballot in NOV. I think he'd get my vote. At this point he's the only one making me not want to puke.

BucEyedPea
09-19-2008, 04:12 PM
Sounds cheesy.

Nightfyre
09-19-2008, 04:13 PM
Sounds cheesy.

Cheesy Macaroni!

Hydrae
09-19-2008, 04:14 PM
I wish he was going to be on the ballot in NOV. I think he'd get my vote. At this point he's the only one making me not want to puke.

I am paying very little attention to the main two. I have every intention of writing Dr Paul in and voting FOR someone instead of against someone for once.

Silock
09-19-2008, 04:49 PM
You ain't seen nothin' yet!

This is so important a topic, that it deserves top billing!!! Hidden inside the AIG bailout funding package, surely hastily cobbled together, but carefully enough to include a totally corrupt clause, was a handy dandy clause that permits raids. The conglomerate financial firms are permitted at this point to use private individual brokerage account funds to relieve their own liquidity pressures.

That right there is ****ed up.


Wow. Just . . . wow.

That's BEYOND fcuked up.

mikey23545
09-19-2008, 04:57 PM
It was the banker on the grassy knoll...

banyon
09-19-2008, 04:58 PM
You ain't seen nothin' yet!

This is so important a topic, that it deserves top billing!!! Hidden inside the AIG bailout funding package, surely hastily cobbled together, but carefully enough to include a totally corrupt clause, was a handy dandy clause that permits raids. The conglomerate financial firms are permitted at this point to use private individual brokerage account funds to relieve their own liquidity pressures.

That right there is ****ed up.



So, embezzlement is now legal?

Mr. Flopnuts
09-19-2008, 05:39 PM
Goodbye middle class. We barely knew thee.