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View Full Version : Elections Sarah Palin swinging undecideds the opposite way?


dirk digler
09-19-2008, 03:28 PM
http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/state/article818181.ece

One thought pushes fence-sitters to the left: Palin

ST. PETERSBURG — Five weeks ago, the St. Petersburg Times convened a group of Tampa Bay voters who were undecided about the presidential election. Their strong distrust of Barack Obama suggested it was a group ripe for John McCain to win over.

Not anymore. The group has swung dramatically, if unenthusiastically, toward Democrat Obama. Most of them this week cited the same reason: Sarah Palin.

"The one thing that frightens me more than anything else are the ideologues. We've seen too many," said 80-year-old Air Force veteran Donn Spegal, a lifelong Republican from St. Petersburg, who sees McCain's new running mate as the kind of "wedge issue" social conservative that has made him disenchanted with his party.

"I'm truly offended by Palin,'' said 37-year-old Republican Philinia Lehr of Largo, a full-time mother with a nursing degree who voted for George Bush in 2004. Like Palin, she has five children and she doesn't buy that the Alaska governor can adequately balance her family and the vice presidency.

"You're somebody's mom and what are you going to do, say, 'Excuse me, country, hold on?' ... She's preaching that she's this mom of the year and taking that poor little baby all over everywhere. And, you know, what she's doing to her 17-year-old daughter is just appalling.'' Lehr said she's bothered by the way Palin's pregnant daughter has been brought into the national spotlight.

Of the 11 undecided voters participating in the free-wheeling discussion one recent evening at the Times — four Republicans, five Democrats, and two registered to no party — only two Republican men applauded the selection of Palin.

Nobody had finalized a choice, but seven of the panelists said that McCain's running mate selection had made them more likely to vote for Obama, and in several cases much more likely.

"And that ticks me off because I do not want Obama,'' said Democrat Annette Kocsis, 68, a former Hillary Rodham Clinton supporter from Clearwater, scoffing at "the pit bull in lipstick," as Palin has called herself.
Palin, who makes her first Florida campaign stop Sunday in a Republican stronghold in north-central Florida, has generated loads of enthusiasm among conservatives. But at least with this randomly selected group of swing voters, she appears to be a serious obstacle to McCain's winning over disillusioned Democrats or moderates.

"That was almost insulting," Democrat Rhonda Laris of Temple Terrace, another strong Clinton backer skeptical of Obama, said of the Palin pick. "Do they think we're really stupid? ... I'm definitely leaning toward the Democratic side now. Sarah Palin scares the crap out of me."

Independent voter Bill Chever, 56, another Air Force veteran from St. Petersburg, said he has voted Republican four times and Democrat three times in the last seven presidential races. He likes and trusts Obama but not Obama's party. Democrats have done nothing of consequence while controlling Congress, Chever said, but he's particularly bothered that the Palins are not cooperating in the "Troopergate" investigation into whether she fired the state police chief for not firing her former brother-in-law from the Alaska state police.

"Here we go with Dick Cheney and his group that's not going to talk to anybody," Chever said. "She is Dick Cheney with a dress on."

Obama is not making inroads because of anything he has done or said. It's more that McCain has repelled these swing voters in the biggest battleground region of the biggest battleground state. In several cases voters who had sounded hungry for a reason to vote for McCain now sound resigned to settling for Obama.

"It's McCain's beliefs," said Annette Maakestad, 57, of St. Petersburg, explaining why she's shifting toward Obama. "I don't think he's changed or he's going to change his party that much. … People who think that someone's going to get in there and make changes that are that dramatic, they're off their rocker."

But they're still not sold on the Illinois senator.

"I really wanted someone youthful and someone who could relate more to the future generations," said Republican Jim Soltis, 70, of Holiday, who is weighing his desire for expanded health insurance access with maintaining Bush's tax cuts. "So I keep watching and watching and hoping for Obama to say the right things, and he's not saying them."

Most of the members of the panel participated in a similar focus group meeting in August, though three new voters joined the group this week. To a person, this is a group of bright, well-informed voters paying close attention to the election and frustrated they're not hearing more specifics and substance from the candidates.

The conventions did nothing for them — bored them, in many cases — and they're looking for the debates starting Friday to finally make up their minds.

"I'm not crazy about Obama, and I'm really not crazy about McCain," said Democrat Carlos Gonzalez, a 70-year-old higher education administrator from Oldsmar, who preferred Clinton. "I really have not heard anybody saying what they're going to do with this mess we have. ... Obama keeps saying they're going to change, but what are they going to change? He doesn't say how he's going to do it, what he's going to change, what's he going to do?"

Rebecca Montilla, a 22-year-old premed student at the University of South Florida, began questioning her Democratic allegiances when it struck her in the primary that the Democrats were sounding more and more reckless about hastily yanking troops out of Iraq. Obama's inexperience worries her, but she comes from a lower-middle-class family in Orlando that is increasingly struggling to keep food on the table. McCain offers no reassurance.

"I go back and forth, like, every day,'' she said. "It just seems like a lot of bickering, and it's really difficult for me to see what McCain's going to do and what Obama's going to do."

Mark Sayre, a 49-year-old St. Petersburg Republican, also wants to hear a clearer agenda from the candidates, but he likes the fresh faces.
"If we could switch and put Barack Obama and Sarah Palin together and put the two in Washington, it would be a clear vote for me. Now it's up in the air," Sayre said.

But enthusiasm for any of the candidates was rare.
Said Lehr: "I wish we could put them both back in the hat, shake it up, and start over and pick two new candidates."

BIG_DADDY
09-19-2008, 03:33 PM
LMAO

mlyonsd
09-19-2008, 03:33 PM
It'll come down to how her and Biden debate. Not the election, just what the country thinks of her. But if the debate goes poorly for her McCain can cash in his chips.

dirk digler
09-19-2008, 03:36 PM
It'll come down to how her and Biden debate. Not the election, just what the country thinks of her. But if the debate goes poorly for her McCain can cash in his chips.

I think it will come down to all 4 debates but I think more people will watch the VP debate just to see how she does. I am sure she will do fine but it is not going to change the perception of her.

By reading the quotes in this article I now know why Florida is tied or has Obama ahead when McCain had been leading in Florida by 10 pts up to a few weeks ago.

HolmeZz
09-19-2008, 03:40 PM
McCain banked on the country being a little more stupid than they really are(but not by much). Most honest women see Palin as a gimmick and most of the public didn't forget all the value McCain had placed on experience.

memyselfI
09-19-2008, 03:47 PM
St. Petersburg Times is one of the most liberal papers in the country. I would expect them to find no other result than that which favors their philosophical candidate.

BucEyedPea
09-19-2008, 03:50 PM
St. Petersburg Times is one of the most liberal papers in the country. I would expect them to find no other result than that which favors their philosophical candidate.

That's exactly what people think of it here. Except they add the suffix "-rag" to the word liberal.

Ultra Peanut
09-19-2008, 03:55 PM
Sorry McSsiahbots, but Palin is a huge liability in Florida.

memyselfI
09-19-2008, 03:56 PM
That's exactly what people think of it here. Except they add the suffix "-rag" to the word liberal.

As I liberal, it's always been one of the top papers of record in the country IMO. It doesn't have the big name like NYT, LAT, or WP but I think they are a better publication than those three.

With that said, I'm not delusional enough to think a poll or forum they sponsor isn't going to have their POV in mind.

Mecca
09-19-2008, 07:45 PM
LMAO

Obviously a well educated thought out response there.

Infidel Goat
09-19-2008, 07:59 PM
St. Petersburg Times is one of the most liberal papers in the country. I would expect them to find no other result than that which favors their philosophical candidate.

Palin currently has a -5 favorability/unfavorability rating.

She was somewhere around +20 eight or nine days ago.

She can always go up again, but the debate is really her only change...

Logical
09-19-2008, 08:16 PM
St. Petersburg Times is one of the most liberal papers in the country. I would expect them to find no other result than that which favors their philosophical candidate.

LMAO

I cannot believe I am seeing you playing this card, you used to ridicule people for playing the (name media source) is liberal so their data cannot be truthful.

Chiefshrink
09-19-2008, 08:19 PM
Palin currently has a -5 favorability/unfavorability rating.

She was somewhere around +20 eight or nine days ago.

She can always go up again, but the debate is really her only change...

What you flowerchildren don't get is when the conservative base is charged up on both sides you "flowerchildren" lose-EVERYTIME. The numbers are always with the Republicans when the Reagan Dems love our conservative ticket because there are more socially conservative Dems than you realize who don't want to be lumped in with the "Hollywood Liberal Nutcracks" and the "Back East Liberal 'my sh**don't stink" elites. The Reagan Dems love McCain and Palin. Nothing you can do about it. ROFL

Ultra Peanut
09-19-2008, 09:50 PM
What you flowerchildren don't get is when the conservative base is charged up on both sides you "flowerchildren" lose-EVERYTIME. The numbers are always with the Republicans when the Reagan Dems love our conservative ticket because there are more socially conservative Dems than you realize who don't want to be lumped in with the "Hollywood Liberal Nutcracks" and the "Back East Liberal 'my sh**don't stink" elites. The Reagan Dems love McCain and Palin. Nothing you can do about it. ROFLYou're the smaller side this time, retard. If it's a war of the bases you want, you're already ****ed.

bango
09-19-2008, 10:36 PM
I wonder if McCain wins that after a year or two into his first term if she is replaced just in case something happens to John. It would be perfect for them if she were to become pregnant after about six months of serving as VP.

cdcox
09-19-2008, 10:41 PM
Well, I'm an undecided. Last 4 elections I voted Clinton, Clinton, Bush, Bush. Obama's acceptance speech tllted me slightly toward him. McCain's announcement of Palin the next day pushed me further toward Obama and that impression has only been strengthened the more I learn about Palin. I'm very reluctant to put her one heart beat away, because she reminds me of W with lipstick.