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View Full Version : U.S. Issues Obama's Grandmother's vote to be counted


kcfanintitanhell
11-04-2008, 06:20 PM
Just on MSNBC

Iowanian
11-04-2008, 06:23 PM
Thats not legal.

Absentee votes of people who pass away prior to election day cannot legally be counted.

Robo-Chachi
11-04-2008, 06:23 PM
But they let McCain vote.

Iowanian
11-04-2008, 06:25 PM
Shhhhhhhhhhh. They're only counting her vote because she was white.

Coach
11-04-2008, 06:26 PM
Thats not legal.

Absentee votes of people who pass away prior to election day cannot legally be counted.

This is correct.

Hydrae
11-04-2008, 06:30 PM
Hmmm, wonder who she voted for? :)

DaFace
11-04-2008, 06:33 PM
Thats not legal.

Absentee votes of people who pass away prior to election day cannot legally be counted.

I didn't see the broadcast, but I think the issue is the timing of it. One article I found mentioned that most states' health departments notify county auditors of deaths on a set schedule (e.g., a monthly basis). So, people who die right before the election end up being "allowed" to vote simply because word doesn't get passed between the necessary entities quickly enough. My guess is that's what happened.

You could argue that a "big name" like Obama's grandma would obviously be known by the county clerk, but I can't blame them for allowing it if word doesn't come through the proper channels.

JMO.

Nightwish
11-04-2008, 06:57 PM
This is correct.
Actually, it isn't. It's true that it is illegal to cast a vote for a deceased on their behalf, even if it can be firmly established how they wished to vote. But if it as absentee ballot and it was already sent in before the death occurred, it is allowed. Now, I don't know if that is the case with his grandmother, but if it is, it's legal.

Iowanian
11-04-2008, 07:01 PM
Its not in Iowa.

Coach
11-04-2008, 07:06 PM
What state did this grandmother casted her absentee ballot? I keep thinking either Illinois or Hawaii.

kcfanintitanhell
11-04-2008, 07:10 PM
I think Hawaii.

Coach
11-04-2008, 07:14 PM
Update: While Hawaii law states that absentee ballots should not be counted if the voter dies prior to the election, officials there say it is too late to remove Dunham's ballot.