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Dunit35
12-22-2008, 06:37 PM
I believe my kitchen pipes are frozen. Its been in the teens/single digits since saturday here. I had the water dripping and the cabinets open since saturday afternoon but it didn't work. My hot water works but the cold doesn't. My hot and cold both work in the bathroom.

I've got a electric heater going near the pipes and the cold water turned on to about medium level trying to thaw it out and push the water through the frozen section. The heater has been going since about 2:45 p.m. and I noticed the water didn't work around 11 this morning. It was working last night.

I think it's frozen under the ground. What do you recommend? I'm afraid the pipes going to burst.

Mr. Plow
12-22-2008, 06:39 PM
Can really give you any direction, but if the pipes burst - and let me tell you that it has been a nationwide problem this week - call 1800 Respond for help. ServiceMaster.

blueballs
12-22-2008, 06:43 PM
wraping an electical(heating) tape around the cold water line may be safer
but I'm no plumber

tmax63
12-22-2008, 06:45 PM
I got to spend Sat. morning laying on my belly digging out a ruptured water line with a coffee cup. Luckily I had everything I needed to cap off the line and it was not a needed line (going to an out building). Good luck.

JASONSAUTO
12-22-2008, 06:47 PM
I got to spend Sat. morning laying on my belly digging out a ruptured water line with a coffee cup. Luckily I had everything I needed to cap off the line and it was not a needed line (going to an out building). Good luck.

no shovels where you're from?:D

tmax63
12-22-2008, 06:51 PM
no room to manuever anything bigger than a garden trowel.

Skip Towne
12-22-2008, 06:52 PM
If the pipe has burst you'll know it when it thaws out.

JASONSAUTO
12-22-2008, 06:53 PM
no room to manuever anything bigger than a garden trowel.

i was just messin wit ya:D

Bacon Cheeseburger
12-22-2008, 06:55 PM
If the water is working in the bathroom it's not an underground problem. When you look under your sink, do the supply pipes go into the wall, or the bottom of the cabinet towards the floor?

cdcox
12-22-2008, 07:01 PM
Antifreeze.

Dunit35
12-22-2008, 07:04 PM
If the water is working in the bathroom it's not an underground problem. When you look under your sink, do the supply pipes go into the wall, or the bottom of the cabinet towards the floor?

It goes directly under the cabinet floor. Well one line goes through a filter in the cabinet but i imagine that has nothing to do with anything since it probably filters both cold and hot.

Bacon Cheeseburger
12-22-2008, 07:11 PM
It goes directly under the cabinet floor. Well one line goes through a filter in the cabinet but i imagine that has nothing to do with anything since it probably filters both cold and hot.
I'm assuming this is in a house? If so, does the sink area happen to be located over a cantilever (basically an overhang)?

Dunit35
12-22-2008, 07:25 PM
I'm assuming this is in a house? If so, does the sink area happen to be located over a cantilever (basically an overhang)?

Yes, if I am understanding what you are talking about which I think I am.

Bacon Cheeseburger
12-22-2008, 07:29 PM
Yes, if I am understanding what you are talking about which I think I am.
http://www.pennridge.org/works/house-cantilever.jpg

The upper level of this house is "cantilevered".

Dunit35
12-22-2008, 07:33 PM
http://www.pennridge.org/works/house-cantilever.jpg

The upper level of this house is "cantilevered".

Then yeah. The cabinets floor is actually three or so inches higher then the kitchen floor.

kstater
12-22-2008, 07:35 PM
Living in OKC, you don't have much "cold"(similar to Arkansas where I live). I'd advise to shut the water off until higher temps(28+) arrive. This would keep the pressure off the lines and hopefully prevent too much expansion that causes burst pipes. I wouldn't worry too much if you don't have too many days below 20 degrees.

Bacon Cheeseburger
12-22-2008, 07:39 PM
Your problem is more than likely in that area then, if the room below the kitchen doesn't have a ceiling, try to identify where the water supply pipes head out into the cantilever, and reach up in there and see if there is insulation stuffed in that area, and if there is pull it out, sometimes people put too much in there and actually block the pipes from the warmer interior air causing the pipes to freeze.

ohiobronco2
12-22-2008, 08:27 PM
What kind of pipes do you have? If an old galvanized line, perhaps some debris broke loose and is lodged in the cold side of the faucet. Of course, I'm only speaking if the faucet was 2 handled. It can't be the aerator if the hot is working.

Rain Man
12-22-2008, 08:33 PM
I had a pipe freeze last week when we had two days of -10 degree weather. We wrapped a heating pad on the exposed part of the pipe and it eventually warmed it up enough to prevent a break. I was quite relieved.