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View Full Version : Football Firing BC's head coach,was it the wrong move?


Fritz88
01-07-2009, 02:20 PM
He just got fired (http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/news?slug=ap-bostoncollege-coach&prov=ap&type=lgns)


BC fires Jagodzinski after coach met with Jets

By HOWARD ULMAN, AP Sports Writer 24 minutes ago

BOSTON (AP)—Boston College fired Jeff Jagodzinski on Wednesday, days after he was warned of dismissal if he interviewed for the coaching job with the New York Jets.

BC athletic director Gene DeFilippo told Jagodzinski (jay-guh-ZIN’-skee) on Saturday that his job would be in jeopardy if he went through with the Jets interview. Jagodzinski met with the Jets on Tuesday night.

A few hours later, at a Wednesday morning meeting, DeFilippo told Jagodzinski he was out.

“We’re really good friends and this is a very difficult thing to do,” DeFilippo said at a news conference. “We will find somebody who really wants to be at Boston College and will be here for the length of their contract.”

DeFilippo said he fired Jagodzinski over a “difference of vision for the future.” He has said he wanted a coach who would stay at the school long term. Jagodzinski has been BC’s coach for two years and had three years left on his contract.

“A coach of his talents and personality will have many future opportunities and I am certain of his continued success,” he said.

In a statement, Jagodzinski thanked school officials.
Boston College athletic director Gene DeFilippo prepares to announce the firing of head football coach Jeff Jagodzinski before a news conference begins on the Boston College campus in Boston, Wednesday afternoon, Jan. 7, 2009.
Boston College athletic direct…
AP - Jan 7, 3:38 pm EST

“I am so proud of what these students-athletes and our staff have accomplished during our tenure here,” Jagodzinski said. “I wish everyone at Boston College the best in the years to come, both on and off the field.”

A phone number listed to his home had been disconnected and he did not immediately return a call for comment left on his cell phone.

DeFilippo could replace Jagodzinski, 45, with defensive coordinator Frank Spaziani or assistant head coach Jack Bicknell Jr.

“I wish this day would end and get over then we can begin to look for the next head football coach here at Boston College,” DeFilippo said.

The BC job was Jagodzinski’s first as a head coach after 22 years as an assistant, 14 in college and eight in the NFL. After one season as offensive coordinator with the Green Bay Packers in 2006, Jagodzinski went to BC after Tom O’Brien left for North Carolina State.

He led the Eagles to two Atlantic Coast Conference title games but lost both to Virginia Tech. They were 11-3 in his first season, when they rose as high as the No. 2 national ranking. They went 9-5 in 2008, winding up with a 16-14 loss to Vanderbilt in the Music City Bowl on Dec. 31 that snapped an eight-game bowl winning streak for the Eagles.

Jagodzinski upset DeFilippo when he didn’t tell his boss that he would interview with the Jets, who fired Eric Mangini the day after the team missed the playoffs despite an 8-3 start.

Jagodzinski was Jets quarterback Brett Favre’s offensive coordinator in Green Bay but is considered a long shot for the New York job. He also could be interested in an offensive coordinator’s position in the pros, which has few if any of the responsibilities of a college coach—recruiting, meeting with alumni and supporters of the program, attending functions and participating in other off-field events.

Seattle needs to assemble a staff under new coach Jim Mora, and Jagodzinski has worked with Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck. Jagodzinski spent two years as BC’s offensive coordinator, starting in 1997 when Hasselbeck played there.

Jagodzinski also worked for Mora as an assistant with the Atlanta Falcons.



I can see the point of DeFilippo and that he wants someone who would not be distracted by other offers. However, going public with this (i.e., the warning) perhaps fueled his decision as he does not want to back down from what spread out in the media. Because most critics are saying that Jagodzinski's shot at being a head coach at the Jets is pretty slim.

OnTheWarpath58
01-07-2009, 02:22 PM
I think it's bullshit that he was fired for trying to better himself, especially when there was little chance that he'd actually get the job.

Now, there are several teams that are interested in him...

I'm betting he becomes the OC of Seattle.

DaneMcCloud
01-07-2009, 02:23 PM
Hell, I'd take him in KC.

The guy's a winner.

Oh, and fuck Boston College.

I'd sue their asses.

Demonpenz
01-07-2009, 02:23 PM
You keep teasing the doggie you will get bitten!

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 02:23 PM
yes.

MIAdragon
01-07-2009, 02:24 PM
Would YOU get canned if your current job knew you were interviewing else where? I dont have a problem with it.

Joe Seahawk
01-07-2009, 02:26 PM
I think it was a good move because now he is going to become the seahawks offensive coordinator..

:D

Ultra Peanut
01-07-2009, 02:27 PM
Only if they would like to be an attractive job for future hires.

BigMeatballDave
01-07-2009, 02:27 PM
Their AD is a fucking douchebag.

FringeNC
01-07-2009, 02:28 PM
I think it was a good move because now he is going to become the seahawks offensive coordinator..

:D

Greg Knapp from Oakland.

Short Leash Hootie
01-07-2009, 02:28 PM
Meh. Moot point in my opinion...I don't think the guy wanted to be there anymore anyways...this at least gives him leverage...if he wants to sit on his ass this year, he will get paid to do it.

BigMeatballDave
01-07-2009, 02:28 PM
Would YOU get canned if your current job knew you were interviewing else where? I dont have a problem with it.No. And I don't know of anyone who has.

FringeNC
01-07-2009, 02:29 PM
There has to be more to this story...

Reerun_KC
01-07-2009, 02:30 PM
Would YOU get canned if your current job knew you were interviewing else where? I dont have a problem with it.

It happens, employers dont like to see employees better themselves at the expense of their company...

That is one reason I chose to remove myself from corporate america... I got sick and tired of the complete douchebags.....

MIAdragon
01-07-2009, 02:30 PM
No. And I don't know of anyone who has.

It happens all the time.

DeezNutz
01-07-2009, 02:30 PM
golden eagles mate for life. hard to fight nature.

DMAC
01-07-2009, 02:31 PM
There has to be more to this story...They might have been looking for an excuse to fire him and make him the bad guy. The AD is a douche, after all.

Amnorix
01-07-2009, 02:31 PM
It just seems very petty and odd.

I really don't get why these coaches can just pick up and leave anyway. In the real world, important employees have contracts that don't allow them to just leave and go work for someone else. I guess they don't include non-compete provisions in these deals as they aren't standard for the industry and the coaches won't agree to them, but it is odd to me.

Anyway, once BC said they would fire Jags if he interviewed, they were forced to follow through. Silly to say it in the first place, however.

Dartgod
01-07-2009, 02:34 PM
I got sick and tired of the complete douchebags.....
Yet you choose to spend your time here. :hmmm:

Sure-Oz
01-07-2009, 02:36 PM
I think it's bullshit that he was fired for trying to better himself, especially when there was little chance that he'd actually get the job.

Now, there are several teams that are interested in him...

I'm betting he becomes the OC of Seattle.

Seahawks tab Knapp to be offensive coordinator

The Seahawks' next offensive coordinator will be Greg Knapp, according to NFL.com's Adam Schefter.
Knapp is coming from Oakland, where he began the season as playcaller. He will keep Seattle's West Coast offense intact, so Matt Hasselbeck won't have to learn new terminology. Knapp has also used zone blocking in both Atlanta and Oakland. While upgrades are possible, Julius Jones and T.J. Duckett are expected to form a "1-2" punch in Seattle for now. The scheme has been mostly successful no matter the location, so Jones could benefit. Jan. 7 - 4:04 pm et
Source: NFL.com

OnTheWarpath58
01-07-2009, 02:38 PM
Seahawks tab Knapp to be offensive coordinator

The Seahawks' next offensive coordinator will be Greg Knapp, according to NFL.com's Adam Schefter.
Knapp is coming from Oakland, where he began the season as playcaller. He will keep Seattle's West Coast offense intact, so Matt Hasselbeck won't have to learn new terminology. Knapp has also used zone blocking in both Atlanta and Oakland. While upgrades are possible, Julius Jones and T.J. Duckett are expected to form a "1-2" punch in Seattle for now. The scheme has been mostly successful no matter the location, so Jones could benefit. Jan. 7 - 4:04 pm et
Source: NFL.com



Ouch.

Sorry, Joe.

CrazyPhuD
01-07-2009, 02:40 PM
I actually don't have an issue with this. It sets a policy, they want commitment any new coach will understand that. Is it really any different than the 2million or $3million dollar poison pills that are in coaches contracts? That if they leave then they have to pay. I have no issue valuing loyalty so long as it goes both ways. As long as they don't interview other coaches while they still have a HC on the job. That's all that this is. He signed a contract for 5 years. Not that he is just employed at will but he signed a contract. If you want to interview that's fine, then sign a yearly contract or no contract at all, be purely an at will employee.

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 02:54 PM
I actually don't have an issue with this. It sets a policy, they want commitment any new coach will understand that. Is it really any different than the 2million or $3million dollar poison pills that are in coaches contracts? That if they leave then they have to pay. I have no issue valuing loyalty so long as it goes both ways. As long as they don't interview other coaches while they still have a HC on the job. That's all that this is. He signed a contract for 5 years. Not that he is just employed at will but he signed a contract. If you want to interview that's fine, then sign a yearly contract or no contract at all, be purely an at will employee.

If they are willing to guarantee they won't fire him for any reason for the duration of his contract then I'd be fine with it, but I highly doubt they'd agree to that.

CrazyPhuD
01-07-2009, 03:10 PM
If they are willing to guarantee they won't fire him for any reason for the duration of his contract then I'd be fine with it, but I highly doubt they'd agree to that.

No sorry it doesn't work that way. If you want to explore other oppurtunties and you have a contract you quit first. If they want to hire another coach then they fire him first. He has the right to quit they have the right to fire. Perfectly fine. The coach violated his contract that's why he was fired and likely you'll see he was fired for cause. Why? Conduct detrimental to the team. This is something every team should do. Sorry, they felt he was replaceable. If they didn't they would have retained him too.

This is how it works in business. If you go and find another oppurtunity you company will NEVER keep you, in fact they will likely walk you out the door as soon as you tell them you have another offer. This is completely expected and 100% normal. The only exception is if they feel they cannot afford to lose you. Then they will give you an incentive to stay. But simply put why would you every want to keep an employee that is looking to leave. You want to keep the people that want to stay, unless they are irreplaceable.

The contract issue is a bit different, call me old school, but it's a degree of ethics here too. You signed a contract if you want to look for other opportunities you should quit first. It is your right and you are being paid MORE than enough it is no hardship to you to do so. Interviewing with another team after your employer asked you not too is a flat out slap in the face. Fire every time and twice on sunday. If BC hadn't asked him not too then this is more of a grey area but since they did and made it clear the consequences I think the guy is complete dirt for doing it anyway. Sorry ZERO sympathy.

DaneMcCloud
01-07-2009, 03:23 PM
No sorry it doesn't work that way. If you want to explore other oppurtunties and you have a contract you quit first. If they want to hire another coach then they fire him first. He has the right to quit they have the right to fire. Perfectly fine. The coach violated his contract that's why he was fired and likely you'll see he was fired for cause. Why? Conduct detrimental to the team. This is something every team should do. Sorry, they felt he was replaceable. If they didn't they would have retained him too.

This is how it works in business. If you go and find another oppurtunity you company will NEVER keep you, in fact they will likely walk you out the door as soon as you tell them you have another offer. This is completely expected and 100% normal. The only exception is if they feel they cannot afford to lose you. Then they will give you an incentive to stay. But simply put why would you every want to keep an employee that is looking to leave. You want to keep the people that want to stay, unless they are irreplaceable.

The contract issue is a bit different, call me old school, but it's a degree of ethics here too. You signed a contract if you want to look for other opportunities you should quit first. It is your right and you are being paid MORE than enough it is no hardship to you to do so. Interviewing with another team after your employer asked you not too is a flat out slap in the face. Fire every time and twice on sunday. If BC hadn't asked him not too then this is more of a grey area but since they did and made it clear the consequences I think the guy is complete dirt for doing it anyway. Sorry ZERO sympathy.

I don't know what world you live in, but it's certainly not the world I live in.

I can't tell you how many times competing music divisions came knocking down my door begging me to join their companies. Each and every time, I stayed because my employer either matched or exceeded the salary and title offered. Each and every time, I met with the other companies because I needed to know exactly what would be best for ME and MY family. Not some fucking multi-national.

If this coach had a losing record, they'd fire him. But if he has a winning record, he's locked in and not allowed to pursue other interests?

That's FUCKED UP.

Ultra Peanut
01-07-2009, 03:25 PM
It sets a policyThe "policy" (precedent?) it sets is that the BC job is a tenuous, non-premier position.

philfree
01-07-2009, 03:34 PM
Right or wrong I don't know but if I were an aspiring coach I don't think I would want to sign a contract to coach for BC if that's the way they treat their coaches. What's wrong with trying to better ones self by moving up the job chain?

PhilFree:arrow:

Amnorix
01-07-2009, 03:35 PM
If they are willing to guarantee they won't fire him for any reason for the duration of his contract then I'd be fine with it, but I highly doubt they'd agree to that.

Well, fire him or not, they do have to PAY him...

Amnorix
01-07-2009, 03:39 PM
I don't know what world you live in, but it's certainly not the world I live in.

I can't tell you how many times competing music divisions came knocking down my door begging me to join their companies. Each and every time, I stayed because my employer either matched or exceeded the salary and title offered. Each and every time, I met with the other companies because I needed to know exactly what would be best for ME and MY family. Not some ****ing multi-national.

If this coach had a losing record, they'd fire him. But if he has a winning record, he's locked in and not allowed to pursue other interests?

That's ****ED UP.

What's f'ed up is that they have a contract that guarantees payment over a certain period, but there is no reciprocal obligation to stay.

Here's our contract. You come here and work for me for 5 years. If I fire you, I MUST pay you. So if I change my mind about you, I'm still ont he hook to pay you.

But, on the flip side, you can leave whenever you want.

It's an odd industry. In the real world, you either have no written contract, in which case you can be fired or quit at any time and everyone walks away, or you have a written contract that says you can't go work for a competitor during the term of the agreement.

Now it is true, of course, that there are employment contracts that allow employees to quit whenever they want (and not get paid if they do), but where a guy is a focal point and you need him to build and maintain a program, and where you're on the hook to pay him for a certain period whether you fire him or not, the overwhelmingly common circumstance is that the guy can't leave and go work for your rival or whatever.

A college to NFL jump is a bit different, of course, as they don't compete, but as far as I can tell coaches can generally jump around pretty freely from college jobs.

CrazyPhuD
01-07-2009, 03:51 PM
I don't know what world you live in, but it's certainly not the world I live in.

I can't tell you how many times competing music divisions came knocking down my door begging me to join their companies. Each and every time, I stayed because my employer either matched or exceeded the salary and title offered. Each and every time, I met with the other companies because I needed to know exactly what would be best for ME and MY family. Not some fucking multi-national.

If this coach had a losing record, they'd fire him. But if he has a winning record, he's locked in and not allowed to pursue other interests?

That's FUCKED UP.

No he is completely allowed to pursue other interests. Just not while employed by someone else. Why is there anything wrong with that? I don't get this. This isn't the same as regular employment. He signed for a specified term and made a commitment. His employer flat out said I don't want you to do this, and he did. So he got fired for insubordination. Period. There is zero wrong with that. If the employer hadn't said something then it would be different but the fact is...his employer and to a degree his friend...said not to and he did it anyway. What does that say about the character of the coach? I wouldn't want him around after that.

But let's be honest he got fired for one reason. He is 110% replaceable. If BC didn't feel that he was he wouldn't have been fired. He signed a term lengthed contract which is different that regular employment and that contract has restrictions in it. He was well compensated for signing said contract and agreed to the terms within. He was fired for violating those terms.

You and I both live in CA with prevents us from being hit with the most egregious of employment contracts. The non-compete clause. In short for those that don't know it's a clause in your employment agreement that says after you leave the company you agree not to work for another company doing similar work for 12 months. For most people that would mean you cannot work for 12 months. Personally I'd never sign one anyway unless they excessively compensated me for it. But if they did and I signed in then I am bound by that contract. Sucks but that is life and you know what you sign.

Look I play the game too, but you also have to understand when you play the game is that it completely depends upon your company deciding you are irreplaceable. The moment you are replaceable and you come back with and offer, they march you out the door and they mail you your belongings later. That's the risk reward of looking for a job when you have one. You're demonstrating disloyalty and you always run the risk of your company telling you to see you later.

This guy was much worse than the normal case because his boss flat out told him not too. I don't see a better sign you're going to get canned than that. He brought this on himself and sadly was to stupid to see the signs on the wall. This will seriously impact his ability to get another job. Disloyalty is one thing, blatant insubordination is another. This and related reasons is likely the exact reason that he was replaceable.

CrazyPhuD
01-07-2009, 03:53 PM
Well, fire him or not, they do have to PAY him...

Actually they may or may not. If they fire him without cause they will. But if they fire him for cause then they may not. Depends upon how the contract was written. If he was fired for insubordination then it could be 'for cause'. We'll have to see how it shakes out.

HemiEd
01-07-2009, 03:55 PM
I understand why BC fired him, and agree with it somewhat.

Having been a fan of a school that the coaches were always leaving to move up, it gets old.

But it sure was fun around here when Self left Illinois for KU. :D

DaneMcCloud
01-07-2009, 03:56 PM
No he is completely allowed to pursue other interests. Just not while employed by someone else. Why is there anything wrong with that? I don't get this. This isn't the same as regular employment. He signed for a specified term and made a commitment. His employer flat out said I don't want you to do this, and he did. So he got fired for insubordination. Period. There is zero wrong with that. If the employer hadn't said something then it would be different but the fact is...his employer and to a degree his friend...said not to and he did it anyway. What does that say about the character of the coach? I wouldn't want him around after that.

But let's be honest he got fired for one reason. He is 110% replaceable. If BC didn't feel that he was he wouldn't have been fired. He signed a term lengthed contract which is different that regular employment and that contract has restrictions in it. He was well compensated for signing said contract and agreed to the terms within. He was fired for violating those terms.

You and I both live in CA with prevents us from being hit with the most egregious of employment contracts. The non-compete clause. In short for those that don't know it's a clause in your employment agreement that says after you leave the company you agree not to work for another company doing similar work for 12 months. For most people that would mean you cannot work for 12 months. Personally I'd never sign one anyway unless they excessively compensated me for it. But if they did and I signed in then I am bound by that contract. Sucks but that is life and you know what you sign.

Look I play the game too, but you also have to understand when you play the game is that it completely depends upon your company deciding you are irreplaceable. The moment you are replaceable and you come back with and offer, they march you out the door and they mail you your belongings later. That's the risk reward of looking for a job when you have one. You're demonstrating disloyalty and you always run the risk of your company telling you to see you later.

This guy was much worse than the normal case because his boss flat out told him not too. I don't see a better sign you're going to get canned than that. He brought this on himself and sadly was to stupid to see the signs on the wall. This will seriously impact his ability to get another job. Disloyalty is one thing, blatant insubordination is another. This and related reasons is likely the exact reason that he was replaceable.

I guess I don't understand how interviewing for another job, regardless of a "contract" is grounds for firing. If that were the case for everyone, unemployment would be sky-high.

I think it's bogus and should be illegal.

DaneMcCloud
01-07-2009, 04:00 PM
Though on second thought, maybe he wanted out of his contract and chose to interview knowing he'd be fired.

OnTheWarpath58
01-07-2009, 04:01 PM
Though on second thought, maybe he wanted out of his contract and chose to interview knowing he'd be fired.

This is EXACTLY what I think happened.

FringeNC
01-07-2009, 04:13 PM
What's f'ed up is that they have a contract that guarantees payment over a certain period, but there is no reciprocal obligation to stay.

Here's our contract. You come here and work for me for 5 years. If I fire you, I MUST pay you. So if I change my mind about you, I'm still ont he hook to pay you.

But, on the flip side, you can leave whenever you want.

It's an odd industry. In the real world, you either have no written contract, in which case you can be fired or quit at any time and everyone walks away, or you have a written contract that says you can't go work for a competitor during the term of the agreement.

Now it is true, of course, that there are employment contracts that allow employees to quit whenever they want (and not get paid if they do), but where a guy is a focal point and you need him to build and maintain a program, and where you're on the hook to pay him for a certain period whether you fire him or not, the overwhelmingly common circumstance is that the guy can't leave and go work for your rival or whatever.

A college to NFL jump is a bit different, of course, as they don't compete, but as far as I can tell coaches can generally jump around pretty freely from college jobs.

Yep. A team makes an investment in these guys, and they have an option to leave for greener pastures, but still get paid if they fail and are fired. You'd think buyout clauses poison pills would be the solution, but evidently they aren't, or some ADs are just too stupid to use them.

Edit: Come to think of it, is there any example of a poison pill associated with a college coach going to the NFL? Are those not enforceable?

beach tribe
01-07-2009, 04:38 PM
They knew they would lose him eventually anyway.

ChiefsCountry
01-07-2009, 04:40 PM
Having been a fan of a school that the coaches were always leaving to move up, it gets old.

I look at it different, it means your team/school is doing something right if people keep hiring away your people and you reload.

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 04:41 PM
No sorry it doesn't work that way. If you want to explore other oppurtunties and you have a contract you quit first. If they want to hire another coach then they fire him first. He has the right to quit they have the right to fire. Perfectly fine. The coach violated his contract that's why he was fired and likely you'll see he was fired for cause. Why? Conduct detrimental to the team. This is something every team should do. Sorry, they felt he was replaceable. If they didn't they would have retained him too.

This is how it works in business. If you go and find another oppurtunity you company will NEVER keep you, in fact they will likely walk you out the door as soon as you tell them you have another offer. This is completely expected and 100% normal. The only exception is if they feel they cannot afford to lose you. Then they will give you an incentive to stay. But simply put why would you every want to keep an employee that is looking to leave. You want to keep the people that want to stay, unless they are irreplaceable.

The contract issue is a bit different, call me old school, but it's a degree of ethics here too. You signed a contract if you want to look for other opportunities you should quit first. It is your right and you are being paid MORE than enough it is no hardship to you to do so. Interviewing with another team after your employer asked you not too is a flat out slap in the face. Fire every time and twice on sunday. If BC hadn't asked him not too then this is more of a grey area but since they did and made it clear the consequences I think the guy is complete dirt for doing it anyway. Sorry ZERO sympathy.


how exactly does his contract prohibit him from interviewing?

and the examples you are giving are of someone who has QUIT. This guy hadn't quit or decided to take a job anywhere, nor did he even have an offer.

and you think he's dirt for interviewing? Who the hell are you to say? For all you know he was treated like crap or found out the mascot was fucking his wife or the AD kicked his dog and thats why he wanted out....so HE'S automatically dirt?

carlos3652
01-07-2009, 05:02 PM
Doesnt this happen with the NFL in regards to co-ordinaters? thats how they move up even though they are under contract. Or any other position in the NFL for that matter?

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 05:05 PM
if every school fired a coach for interviewing, you'd have 43 schools looking for coaches every year...

Valiant
01-07-2009, 05:56 PM
Hell, I'd take him in KC.

The guy's a winner.

Oh, and **** Boston College.

I'd sue their asses.

Why???

I would fire him also for job hunting while I am employing him to coach my team.. Coaching is not an ordinary job like working 9-5 blue collar.. He is there to better the team, if he is looking at other jobs then his heart is not really there and they need to find someone who wants to be there..

Of he could have just told the Jets to keep his name behind doors while he interviewed and there would have been no problems..

Valiant
01-07-2009, 05:57 PM
Doesnt this happen with the NFL in regards to co-ordinaters? thats how they move up even though they are under contract. Or any other position in the NFL for that matter?

I believe it is different.. They are not the main recruiters for the team.. College coaches are the face of their program.. If your face is out looking for another job publicly then his heart is not in the program..

Mecca
01-07-2009, 05:57 PM
Why???

I would fire him also for job hunting while I am employing him to coach my team.. Coaching is not an ordinary job like working 9-5 blue collar.. He is there to better the team, if he is looking at other jobs then his heart is not really there and they need to find someone who wants to be there..

Of he could have just told the Jets to keep his name behind doors while he interviewed and there would have been no problems..

Well that's great you'd just be looking for a new coach every 2 years, that is unless the coach you hired was so shitty no one else wanted him.

Sully
01-07-2009, 06:07 PM
This past year of coaching, I knew was going to be my last year at that school. A couple of hopeful opportunities were arising, and I disagreed with damn near every move our head coach made. It was a tough year, and my worst job coaching. I did everything right, and taught the kids...but my heart was just never there, and for the first time, I found myself unwilling to go the extra mile for the team, at times.
Looking back I should've been a better professional about it, and put the future stuff out of my mind, but being in the situation, it was hard not to think about greener pastures.
Should they have fired him?
I don't think so.
But I understand the move, going through that year of knowing one foot was out the door, and seeing how it affected my performance.

Valiant
01-07-2009, 06:13 PM
Well that's great you'd just be looking for a new coach every 2 years, that is unless the coach you hired was so shitty no one else wanted him.

If there were not a lot coaches that publicly state they are happy where they are at you might have a point..

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 06:37 PM
If there were not a lot coaches that publicly state they are happy where they are at you might have a point..

yeah, because they'd never lie.

mikey23545
01-07-2009, 06:44 PM
It happens, employers dont like to see employees better themselves at the expense of their company...

That is one reason I chose to remove myself from corporate america... I got sick and tired of the complete douchebags.....

Why, were you tired of the competition?

DaneMcCloud
01-07-2009, 06:45 PM
Why???

I would fire him also for job hunting while I am employing him to coach my team.. Coaching is not an ordinary job like working 9-5 blue collar.. He is there to better the team, if he is looking at other jobs then his heart is not really there and they need to find someone who wants to be there..

Of he could have just told the Jets to keep his name behind doors while he interviewed and there would have been no problems..

This makes no sense.

So by your standard, the only people that should be looking for a better job are...?

JFC, Dude. The guy's a fucking Boston College and has a chance to be the head coach of the New York Jets. Are you telling me that he's just supposed to say no thanks, I've got a job?

Sorry, that's moronic.

Oxford
01-07-2009, 08:03 PM
It was absolutely the right move. In the NFL you have to get permission to interview someone who is under contract to another team. There are probably provisions in the contract that the coach signed that state what he is allowed to do vis-a-vis job opportunities. My bet is that we haven't heard all of the story.

mikeyis4dcats.
01-07-2009, 08:11 PM
It was absolutely the right move. In the NFL you have to get permission to interview someone who is under contract to another team. There are probably provisions in the contract that the coach signed that state what he is allowed to do vis-a-vis job opportunities. My bet is that we haven't heard all of the story.

BC is not an NFL team.

Mecca
01-07-2009, 10:22 PM
Pete Carroll has stated numerous times he's happy at SC but he's taken a few NFL interviews but not taken the jobs, guess he should have been fired too eh?

If you have a good coach he's going to get interview offers, I wish them luck finding a coach so shitty no one wants to interview him.

OnTheWarpath58
01-07-2009, 10:23 PM
I don't see Stanford telling Jim Harbaugh he's fired if he interviews for one of the jobs he's reportedly a candidate for...

dj56dt58
01-07-2009, 10:34 PM
all they did was fuck theirselves..its gonna be a lot harder to bring in coaches

J Diddy
01-07-2009, 10:37 PM
all they did was **** theirselves..its gonna be a lot harder to bring in coaches


exactly

nobody wants to feel stuck

Dylan
01-08-2009, 01:27 AM
Jagodzinski’s contract reportedly contains no clause that prevents him interviewing with the Jets. DeFilippo said, “I want to go on the record and say this decision was mine. I am the director of athletics, I made the decision,” DeFilippo said. “I asked for approval from the administration and they gave me that approval." -- Nice, these words will cost him in a court of law.

America is still the land of opportunity. Maybe DeFilippo should sit in the corner by the open door, pull out his notebook and write these words down a million times.

Valiant
01-08-2009, 01:43 AM
This makes no sense.

So by your standard, the only people that should be looking for a better job are...?

JFC, Dude. The guy's a ****ing Boston College and has a chance to be the head coach of the New York Jets. Are you telling me that he's just supposed to say no thanks, I've got a job?

Sorry, that's moronic.

No, he can do it.. And BC has every right to fire him or let him go..

Valiant
01-08-2009, 01:44 AM
Pete Carroll has stated numerous times he's happy at SC but he's taken a few NFL interviews but not taken the jobs, guess he should have been fired too eh?

If you have a good coach he's going to get interview offers, I wish them luck finding a coach so shitty no one wants to interview him.

And his current employers have never given him an ultimatum either..

J Diddy
01-08-2009, 01:48 AM
No, he can do it.. And BC has every right to fire him or let him go..



I think it was a dickhead move.

Valiant
01-08-2009, 01:49 AM
I think it was a dickhead move.

People just refuse to look at it from the other side..

Mecca
01-08-2009, 01:55 AM
Because what they are doing totally contradicts typical business in this profession.

J Diddy
01-08-2009, 02:13 AM
People just refuse to look at it from the other side..


I see their point, but to me that point is that of a jaded lover. Jealous if he talks to another woman....

Fritz88
01-08-2009, 03:08 AM
A look at the issue from a different point of view:

http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/news?slug=dw-bc010709&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

Bravo Boston College

By Dan Wetzel, Yahoo! Sports 10 hours, 56 minutes ago

The boss told the employee that if he did something he’d be fired. The employee did it. Like 99 percent of us would, the employee got fired.

It’s difficult to work up much sympathy for Jeff Jagodzinski, who was Boston College’s football coach until he was canned Wednesday for defying orders – in this case interviewing for the head coaching position of the New York Jets.

The man brazenly brushed off authority and paid for it.

The underlying issue though is built on decades of lies and deception; empty contracts and empty promises in college athletics.

Jagodzinski is a football coach and he knows as well as anyone that football coaches get fired, often quickly. A five-year extension today can be a pink slip tomorrow. It’s a bottom line, cut-throat business of minimal loyalty.

There was talk even Joe Paterno was going to get run out of Penn State this year.

Jagodzinski was like most football coaches who believe their contract is not a guarantee of employment but a starting point for a buyout. It’s why almost every coach has his eye on his next job – in Jagodzinski’s case a higher-paying one in the NFL.

You can understand why Jagodzinski would want to coach in the NFL. You can understand why he didn’t consider just talking to an NFL team high treason.

His mistake was trying it with Boston College. At most colleges, such an action would result in a rich contract extension. Schools have been bamboozled for years by coaches with wandering eyes. The mere rumor of NFL interest gets most of them a raise.

Boston College is like few other programs though. It might be naive and hopelessly rooted in a bygone era, but athletic director Gene DeFilippo isn’t apologizing for it. Nor should he.

DeFilippo plucked Jagodzinski from the Green Bay Packers when he was just an assistant with no head coaching experience at any level.

He gave him a big salary at a great academic school in the Atlantic Coast Conference. He expected loyalty in return. When he asked Jagodzinski for that during the hiring process two years ago, DeFilippo says Jagodzinski promised it.

Interviewing with the Jets was a clear break of that promise. It was the modern coaching game being played at one of the nation’s last remaining old-school programs.

The old ways won. Wednesday, DeFilippo held a press conference where he kept praising Jagodzinski for being a great coach and a close friend but someone who needed to be fired anyway.

“When somebody looks you in the eye and shakes your hand and tells you something, that to me is as important as a contract,” DeFilippo said to the Boston Globe. “When somebody gives you a break and then after two years, the first chance you have to go interview, then you’re going to take off, that is a little bit … it hurts.

“I certainly would not have hired a coach if I thought he was going to leave in two years,” DeFilippo continued. “The understanding was I wanted a coach who was going to be here for a long time, and I thought I had one.”

The firing was a harsh move, yet a breath of fresh air.

The root of the problem is a coarsening of relations in college athletics. There was a time when coaches received a minimum of five years at a school. There was a time when losing seasons, even consecutive ones, were forgiven. There was a time when there was a real partnership between individual and institution, an understanding that a good man can have a bad run and still be the right fit.

Those days are mostly gone. College athletics is often worse than the NFL. Even legendary coaches can be run off for a single bad season. Schools have shown virtually no loyalty or long-term thinking.

Everything is about winning right now. These institutions of higher learning often get led around by the whims of super boosters.

Boston College has always been an exception though. Through the years it’s been patient with coaches. Not perfect, but closer than most schools. It maintains a high graduation rate, makes athletes take real classes and aspires to NCAA compliance in a way few others do. There is still some decency in Boston.

It tends to scoff at the win-obsessed ways of other schools.

DeFilippo expects his coach to understand that. Sure a coach should be nervous at most places, he argued, but BC is different. The school is loyal and thus it expects the same in return. If you don’t want to be here, someone else will take the job. We’re not begging anyone to stay.

DeFilippo felt burnt about two years ago when Tom O’Brien, who could’ve coached there forever, up and left for North Carolina State. The AD promised he wouldn’t be fooled twice. Jagodzinski should’ve understood that.

To some, Boston College is short-sighted, running off a good man and a good coach just for talking to an NFL team. The program might be set back.

Boston College was actually being long-sighted though. In an era of epic sellouts by schools, in a win-at-all-costs environment, BC said that we value loyalty above almost everything. We are who we are; take or leave it.

Without apology it chose to be one of the last throwbacks amid the storm.