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Fritz88
01-10-2009, 03:09 PM
http://www.wbns.com/live/content/local/stories/2009/01/09/story_carjacking_text.html?sid=102

Man Outsmarts Carjackers With Text Message
Friday, January 9, 2009 8:26 AM

COLUMBUS, Ohio A man who was carjacked outside a south side restaurant said his friends helped him come up with a plan to outsmart the thieves, 10TV News reported Thursday.

Alan Heuss was sitting in his BMW on Wednesday night with the engine running when a man with a gun approached him, 10TV's Kurt Ludlow reported.

"Some young man came up and opened the passenger door and stuck a gun in my face and told me to get out," Heuss said.

The thieves got away with Heuss' car, cell phone and some cash.

Heuss filed a police report and then met his friends to drown his sorrows, Ludlow reported. One of his friends came up with an idea to contact the thieves.

"He said 'I'm going to text these guys, I'm going to blow some smoke their way,'" Heuss said. "He said. 'I'm going to tell them I've got a bunch of hot chicks, as if I'm texting you, and that we've got some drugs, too.'"

The carjackers took the bait, Ludlow reported.

"Very early in the morning they gave him the address where they were," Heuss said. "They were expecting this hot chick to arrive with drugs, and Columbus police officers arrived instead."

Three men were caught red-handed in the stolen vehicle. Heuss said he expected to get his vehicle out of the impound lot on Friday.

"It's a little seven-hour saga where the good guys won," Heuss said.

Investigators said the carjackers are suspected in a series of car thefts.

bowener
01-10-2009, 03:12 PM
lulz!

lazepoo
01-10-2009, 03:14 PM
This made my day. I can see the look on their faces when there were no girls or drugs, just a lot of middle aged men with guns and badges. LOL

Marcellus
01-10-2009, 03:16 PM
ROFLROFLROFLROFLROFL

Proof that thieves usually aren't too bright.

DBoweFoSho
01-10-2009, 03:23 PM
ha! owned

Rain Man
01-10-2009, 03:29 PM
According to that court case in Missouri, isn't that a violation of the cell phone provider's service agreement? I bet they free the criminals and let them sue the guy who sent the text message.

Bacon Cheeseburger
01-10-2009, 04:05 PM
http://www.mustangmods.com/data/10900/brilliant.jpg

Jenson71
01-10-2009, 04:07 PM
:clap:

doomy3
01-10-2009, 04:07 PM
According to that court case in Missouri, isn't that a violation of the cell phone provider's service agreement? I bet they free the criminals and let them sue the guy who sent the text message.

are you being serious?

Rain Man
01-10-2009, 04:15 PM
are you being serious?


Yeah. There's that case in Missouri where the woman pretended to be a boy to screw with some 13-year old girl and make her feel bad. The girl committed suicide, and they're trying to put the woman in prison for violating the Internet provider's service agreement on some trumped-up felony charge. While the woman was obviously an immature jerk, I think it's a really bad precedent to put someone in prison for using a false name on the Internet.

(In the interest of full disclosure, my name is not really Rain Man.)

crazycoffey
01-10-2009, 04:16 PM
ROFLROFLROFLROFLROFL

Proof that thieves usually aren't too bright.


As some law enforcement people say, "we don't usually catch the smart ones"

KCChiefsMan
01-10-2009, 04:17 PM
thats awesome! glad it worked

unothadeal
01-10-2009, 04:18 PM
Yeah. There's that case in Missouri where the woman pretended to be a boy to screw with some 13-year old girl and make her feel bad. The girl committed suicide, and they're trying to put the woman in prison for violating the Internet provider's service agreement on some trumped-up felony charge. While the woman was obviously an immature jerk, I think it's a really bad precedent to put someone in prison for using a false name on the Internet.

(In the interest of full disclosure, my name is not really Rain Man.)

I thought it was Russ Rainmen

Marcellus
01-10-2009, 04:22 PM
Yeah. There's that case in Missouri where the woman pretended to be a boy to screw with some 13-year old girl and make her feel bad. The girl committed suicide, and they're trying to put the woman in prison for violating the Internet provider's service agreement on some trumped-up felony charge. While the woman was obviously an immature jerk, I think it's a really bad precedent to put someone in prison for using a false name on the Internet.

(In the interest of full disclosure, my name is not really Rain Man.)

That was a myspace deal. I doubt that would apply to texting to your own phone.

Rain Man
01-10-2009, 04:36 PM
That was a myspace deal. I doubt that would apply to texting to your own phone.


Well, I'm admittedly not a lawyer.

jjchieffan
01-10-2009, 05:18 PM
ha! owned

nOOb!! don't you know it's spelled pwned around here?:D

Thig Lyfe
01-10-2009, 05:21 PM
nOOb!! don't you know it's spelled pwned around here?:D

By "here" do you mean "the Internet"?

JohnnyV13
01-10-2009, 05:59 PM
Yeah. There's that case in Missouri where the woman pretended to be a boy to screw with some 13-year old girl and make her feel bad. The girl committed suicide, and they're trying to put the woman in prison for violating the Internet provider's service agreement on some trumped-up felony charge. While the woman was obviously an immature jerk, I think it's a really bad precedent to put someone in prison for using a false name on the Internet.

(In the interest of full disclosure, my name is not really Rain Man.)

Rainman, I don't think it will go to far. First of all, it will have nothing to do with the conviction. To exclude evidence, you need some kind of constitutional search and seizure violation, or proceedural error by the police. In this case, we have private individuals who acted independently of police. THe police only became invovled after the private citizens gave notice. The constitutional protections apply to STATE actors against private citizens. Private citizens acting against private citizens are an entirely different matter.

Consequently, the criminal evidence will not be thrown out and any conviction will stand.

I also doubt the state has any kind of criminal case against the friends for the TOS violation. First, I doubt any prosecutor would bring charges (prosecutorial discretion). Even if one were stupid enough to do so, a certain element of that crime will be inflicting unjust harm upon the victim. Here we have a deception that causes a thief to return stolen property. Even if the thief suffers a criminal penalty, there is no "unjust harm" to support the internet deception crime.

A separate fraud case brought by the thieves against the friend in tort law would fail for similar reasoning to the criminal case.

If the judge does not want to impute an "unjust" qualifier into the damages element of the criminal or tort cases, the friend could then make an equitable argument which they would surely win.

kstater
01-10-2009, 06:19 PM
nOOb!! don't you know it's spelled pwned around here?:D

it's n00b, you n00b.