PDA

View Full Version : Computers RAM question...


Pants
01-10-2009, 08:22 PM
...what's better 4 gigs of PC 6400 DDR2/800 or 2 gigs of PC 8500 DDR2/1066?

KcMizzou
01-10-2009, 08:58 PM
I'm pretty sure 4 gigs of the slower RAM beats 2 of the faster.

Mr. Laz
01-10-2009, 09:01 PM
2 gigs of faster imo


maybe the only time 4 gigs would be better is if you were do very high end type video converting etc.

jjjayb
01-10-2009, 09:05 PM
What operating system? If it's xp 32 bit then maybe the faster 2 gigs. Windows will only see a little over 3 gigs of the 4 gigs anyway. If it's Vista then definitely the 4 gigs. It's a hog.

Pants
01-10-2009, 09:07 PM
What operating system? If it's xp 32 bit then maybe the faster 2 gigs. Windows will only see a little over 3 gigs of the 4 gigs anyway. If it's Vista then definitely the 4 gigs. It's a hog.

Yeah, it'll be Vista. Thanks for the answer.

Pants
01-10-2009, 09:09 PM
Also, is RAID-0 worth it?

unlurking
01-10-2009, 09:13 PM
Also, is RAID-0 worth it?
Flat out YES.

HC_Chief
01-10-2009, 09:25 PM
Also, is RAID-0 worth it?

For performance it is excellent. Just be sure to back everything up. A loss of one disk in a RAID-0 set equals loss of the set.

RAID-1+0 is best for performance & redundancy, but can be cost prohibitive. If you have the space & want that added protection, go RAID-1+0 (aka RAID 10)

unlurking
01-10-2009, 09:33 PM
For performance it is excellent. Just be sure to back everything up. A loss of one disk in a RAID-0 set equals loss of the set.

RAID-1+0 is best for performance & redundancy, but can be cost prohibitive. If you have the space & want that added protection, go RAID-1+0 (aka RAID 10)
Or just buy 2 small disks and created a logical drive for the OS and program files at RIAD 0, then use a separate drive array for your data. With the size of MP3 and movie collections now adays, data sets of the average user are very large, but require very little speed.

Personally, I've always preferred speed over redundancy. I make backups, I can access my data through an external drive if needed.

Pants
01-10-2009, 09:49 PM
Thanks for the input guys. I'm not all that worried about space, but I do care about speed.

Basileus777
01-10-2009, 10:14 PM
Yeah, it'll be Vista. Thanks for the answer.

Vista 64?

Count Alex's Wins
01-10-2009, 10:17 PM
RAM is so cheap what's really the diff. in price?

aturnis
01-11-2009, 12:56 AM
What is Raid-0?

DaneMcCloud
01-11-2009, 01:06 AM
What is Raid-0?

ROFL

So, you don't know jackshit about football and you don't know jackshit about computers.

Check.

chasedude
01-11-2009, 01:15 AM
Yeah, it'll be Vista. Thanks for the answer.

Only vista 64 will be able to see past 3G of memory. Vista 32 is limited just as XP is.

Valiant
01-11-2009, 04:05 AM
Only vista 64 will be able to see past 3G of memory. Vista 32 is limited just as XP is.

I think it depends on the board.. I have 3.8show up on mine and it is not 64bit..

HC_Chief
01-11-2009, 09:36 AM
Only vista 64 will be able to see past 3G of memory. Vista 32 is limited just as XP is.

You can trick a 32-bit OS to address >4GB but they often go full retard when you do. I know XP Pro does.

It is called Physical Address Extensioning (PAE); it uses a bit switch to convert the OS into a 36-bit OS, which can address physical memory above the 4GB limit.

It's just better to go w/ 64-bit. Esp since there are now drivers available for most hardware.

If you're going to store a shitton of MP3s & other media, unlurking's advice is best: build a RAID-0 for you OS & data (or just apps), then put the media files on external/cheap storage. And please back everything up. Losing data due to hardware failure sucks. It can be very expensive to recover data from a failed drive. Better to spend an extra couple of hundred bucks for backups. (some solutions are even cheaper)

unlurking
01-11-2009, 10:22 AM
Yep, big fan of backups. Now that you can get a half terabyte of storage for about $100 these days, there really is no excuse not to have an automated backup solution even for home systems.

DaFace
01-11-2009, 11:01 AM
What is Raid-0?

It's a system of using multiple hard drives in combination as one for performance and/or backup purposes. RAID-0 technically isn't truly RAID at all, as there is no redundancy, meaning you'll get a performance boost, but if either drive fails, all your data (on both drives) is toast.

aturnis
01-11-2009, 02:58 PM
ROFL

So, you don't know jackshit about football and you don't know jackshit about computers.

Check.

haha haha ha...so you're a homo! haha ha!