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View Full Version : Computers Removing some useless Programs from PC


bowener
01-12-2009, 07:51 PM
I am cleaning out one of my PC's, and when I was doing the full removal of programs I noticed that there were a few hundred "Microsoft Security Updates (KB123456)". What the hell are these? I realize they are updates, but some are years old, isn't this fucker supposed to delete the old ones? I want to remove them, but I am afraid I will fuck up the computer. I have not noticed this on my other PC, but I will check it out soon too.

Can somebody explain to me why they have continued to pile up, and not erase as a new update arrives, as well as if I should remove them or not (obviously not the new ones)? It seems like this would really start to eat up space.

Thanks.

DaFace
01-12-2009, 08:28 PM
Microsoft releases security updates all the time. For the most part, they're cumulative, meaning the old ones stay in there permanently. In general, you should leave them alone. If you can't stand seeing them in your list, uncheck the box up at the top that says "Show Updates" in the Add/Remove Programs control panel.

bowener
01-12-2009, 08:42 PM
Microsoft releases security updates all the time. For the most part, they're cumulative, meaning the old ones stay in there permanently. In general, you should leave them alone. If you can't stand seeing them in your list, uncheck the box up at the top that says "Show Updates" in the Add/Remove Programs control panel.

Thanks. I figured they were cumulative. It makes sense so that the DL will be a small file each time.

BigRedChief
01-13-2009, 11:20 AM
And I wouldn't remove any of them. They are usually small files anyway.

Thig Lyfe
01-13-2009, 05:03 PM
How much does removing programs you never use improve the day-to-day functioning of your computer?

StcChief
01-13-2009, 05:14 PM
Storage space, fragmentation/defrag needed or just buy an add on drive...

Fish
01-13-2009, 05:54 PM
How much does removing programs you never use improve the day-to-day functioning of your computer?

Unless you have <300MB free space or so you're not going to see any improvement with day-to-day functioning by removing unused programs.

How much RAM do you have? Adding RAM would be the easiest and most cost-effective way to improve performance. It's cheap as shit, generally easy to install, and you don't have to make any crazy system changes to do it. Just be sure to figure out what type of RAM you need.

Don't bother with defragging the machine. Defrag is the single most misunderstood and retartedly useless recommendation for improving system performance. There are very very few situations where a defrag would ever be necessary or beneficial these days. And doing so is pretty hard on your hard drive.

Valiant
01-13-2009, 05:55 PM
just go into msconfig and turn off certain startup items.. Leave everything running that says MS and your security software.. I have two items on my startup bar..

If it is a laptop you need to have more things running like keypad..

You can also go into my computer and hit properties to speed up the computer some...

Fish
01-13-2009, 06:01 PM
just go into msconfig and turn off certain startup items.. Leave everything running that says MS and your security software.. I have two items on my startup bar..

If it is a laptop you need to have more things running like keypad..

You can also go into my computer and hit properties to speed up the computer some...

LOL.... what? Hit properties?

Are you thinking of increasing the size of the Virtual Memory?

Short Leash Hootie
01-13-2009, 06:08 PM
Kind of off topic, but CCleaner is an awesome program that allows you to easily remove useless programs...I like going through CCleaner rather than add/remove programs...for some reason it just seems to be more efficient.

Fish
01-13-2009, 06:33 PM
Kind of off topic, but CCleaner is an awesome program that allows you to easily remove useless programs...I like going through CCleaner rather than add/remove programs...for some reason it just seems to be more efficient.

No offense, but I would stay away from registry cleaners as well.....

This is advice straight from Mark Russinovich, who knows more about Windows errors and how to fix them than just about anybody. I use Winternals frequently, and in my opinion it's the absolute best Windows recovery program ever made. This guy knows his shit..


Quote:
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td class="alt2" style="border: 1px inset ;"> Hi Mark, do you really think that Registry junk left by uninstalled programs could severely slow down the computer (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#)? I would like to 'hear' your opinion. </td> </tr> </tbody></table>
His reply fairly captures my own view: Quote:
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td class="alt2" style="border: 1px inset ;"> No, even if the registry was massively bloated there would be little impact on the performance of anything other than exhaustive searches.

On Win2K Terminal Server (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#) systems, however, there is a limit on the total amount of Registry data that can be loaded and so large profile hives can limit the number of users that can be logged on simultaneously.

I haven't and never will implement a Registry cleaner since it's of little practical use on anything other than Win2K terminal servers (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#) and developing one that's both safe and effective requires a huge amount of application-specific knowledge. </td> </tr> </tbody></table>
To which you can add the additional problem: applications installed on a machine that is used by more than one person can creates entries for each user in their private registry store: HKEY_CURRENT_USER. Because registry cleaners (and REGEDIT.EXE) operate under SYSTEM permissions with the logged-in user security token (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#), they cannot access these other registry entries.

Quoting Mark Russinovich again: Quote:
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td class="alt2" style="border: 1px inset ;"> Uninstallers typically delete their application’s system-wide settings from the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE part of the Registry and any per-user settings of the user running the uninstaller from HKEY_CURRENT_USER. But what happens to the per-user settings of the other users that used the application? You guessed it, Registry junk gets created - and possibly file system (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#) junk in the application's Application Data folder in the \Documents and Settings directories of other users. An uninstall is only thorough if the user performing it is the only one that used the software. </td> </tr> </tbody></table>
So you have these issues with a registry cleaner:
If an application is installed and used only by one user, a registry cleaner run by another user will remove "invalid" entries in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and disable the application from working by the other user(s);
If an application is installed by User #1, and used as well by User#2, the registry cleaner operation run by User#1 cannot remove the instances of the application created by User#2.On top of these technical issues that should scare you away, there is the central argument made by Mr. Russinovich: only if the registry cleaner has a sophisticated database of all application software (http://www.windowsbbs.com/#) installation registry changes would it have a chance of being safe to use. There is to my knowledge no such animal out there.

Though the Microsoft Knowledge Base has a lot of articles on how to repair the damage created by using these utilities.

http://www.windowsbbs.com/windows-xp/61015-xp-fixes-myth-1-registry-cleaners.html

Valiant
01-13-2009, 08:25 PM
LOL.... what? Hit properties?

Are you thinking of increasing the size of the Virtual Memory?

My Computer

Properties

Advanced System Settings

Performance (unclick all that shit you don't need)

It is not much, but when you do this with the msconfig cleaning your computer runs a bit faster..

Fish
01-13-2009, 08:38 PM
My Computer

Properties

Advanced System Settings

Performance (unclick all that shit you don't need)

It is not much, but when you do this with the msconfig cleaning your computer runs a bit faster..

OK. That will turn off some animations and such.

If you want a bigger performance increase, you can also increase the virtual memory which is what I thought you were talking about. But this one is really only effective if you have plenty of free disk space.

From the Performance window you described above, click on the Advanced tab. Then click on the Change button on the Virtual Memory section at the bottom. Set it to Custom Size, and set it to a little less than half of your available free space. If you have >5GB free space, then set a virtual memory size of 2000MB or so.