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View Full Version : Football How many Cardinals fans will be at the Super Bowl?


thurman merman
01-30-2009, 11:23 AM
Taking into account that the Cardinals didn't have any fans until a few weeks ago, and the Steelers have arguably the best fans in the NFL (and an impressive traveling fan base as well), this should pretty much feel like a home game for the Steelers. How many Cardinals fans do you think will be at the game?

ArrowheadHawk
01-30-2009, 11:25 AM
I bet there will be more than you think.

thurman merman
01-30-2009, 11:27 AM
I bet there will be more than you think.

maybe some rich retired folks who moved out to arizona for the warm weather. other than a few of those, i can't imagine a huge representation from their fans.

StcChief
01-30-2009, 11:28 AM
10-20% inside stadium. at best. of course scalper prices are off....

ArrowheadHawk
01-30-2009, 11:29 AM
On a side note my wife just ordered chiefs jackets for my kids and the damn place sent me one that was a Cardinals jacket.

thurman merman
01-30-2009, 11:39 AM
On a side note my wife just ordered chiefs jackets for my kids and the damn place sent me one that was a Cardinals jacket.

perhaps the NFL is trying to forcibly create a cardinals fan base?

Ultra Peanut
01-30-2009, 11:50 AM
The Super Bowl isn't for fans.

Frazod
01-30-2009, 11:52 AM
The Super Bowl isn't for fans.

Seriously. The place will be packed with rich douchebags who are there just so they'll be able to impress others with their tickets.

The Super Bowl was stolen from the fans years ago.

DaKCMan AP
01-30-2009, 12:01 PM
The Super Bowl isn't for fans.

It's pretty ridiculous. Even the NFL Experience, geared toward fans, is getting expensive. There are tons of parties going on around here this week and each costs mega $$ ($200-$1000 entry to most).

I'm staying the hell away from Tampa this weekend, which sucks since the bars I regularly go to are over there.

vailpass
01-30-2009, 12:06 PM
Bowl no longer spiked
By Woody Paige
The Denver Post
Posted: 01/29/2009 12:30:00 AM MST

I've been to a lot of Super Bowl cities, and this is a ghost town." — Mark Schlereth


TAMPA, Fla. — The corpulent figure in a Steelers' jersey, with No. 8 and "Maddox" on the back, was walking in the middle of the street in Centro Ybor, Tampa's Cuban community, on Tuesday night. He was alone, unless you count his cocktail.

I thought: Tommy Maddox sure has let himself go since playing quarterback for the Broncos and the Steelers. Then I thought: Where is everyone? This is Super Bowl week.

Ybor City "reminds me of New Orleans' Bourbon Street," said Jerry Langford, the solitary Steelers admirer, "except without the people."

What if they gave a Super Bowl, and nobody came?

The grandest, greatest, glitziest, gaudiest, garish-est sports week in America may look the same on TV, and the game will be sold out, and there's excitement — and sea gulls — in the air. But the week feels different.

Super Bowl XXV was played in Tampa during the first Gulf War, and Super Bowl XXXVI in New Orleans was the first after 9/11, but the country craved diversions in those times, and both games provided relief — and fantastic finishes. The Buffalo Bills missed a field goal at the end to give the New York Giants a 20-19 victory in 25, and the New England Patriots got a field goal at the conclusion to beat St. Louis 20-17 in 36.

Perhaps a field goal in overtime will decide 43. This week necessitates resuscitation. And, indeed, shouldn't the attention be on the game, not Diddy?

Playboy and Sports Illustrated have canceled their annual pre-Bowl parties. Say it ain't so, Hef! The bashes are down, the no-shows up. We won't always have Paris . . . Hilton.

Tampa aviation officials expect corporate jet landings to drop 50 percent. CEOs — poor babies — apparently don't want to be spied cavorting and guzzling champagne at the Super Bowl when their companies are conking. FedEx and General Motors have pulled out of their participation. There are empty parking lots instead of party tents. A planned pro athletes-celebrity golf tournament was ditched a few weeks ago because of lack of sponsors and lack of players. The Maxim magazine party has reduced its guest list by more than 1,000.

Tampa officials believe the economic impact on the area will be reduced by at least 20 percent from past Super Bowls. Fewer fans and media are coming, and their stays have been shortened, their expenditures slashed.

"Worst experience at a Super Bowl I've ever had," said the self-proclaimed "biggest scalper in the country" as he drowned his sorrows at a downtown hotel bar. "For example," he slurred, "I got two on the 34-yard line, 17 rows up. In the past I could get $7,000 apiece for them kind of seats. I can't get a nibble at $3,000. I'm dying here."

Two things at work here: The economy and the Cardinals.

Not even the Super Bowl is impervious to the effects of the country's deep recession.

And, honestly, the Arizona Cardinals don't travel well. They wouldn't have sold out their first home playoff game, and avoided a television blackout, if a pool supplies company hadn't bought a large block of tickets late. People in Phoenix have moved there from somewhere else, or they don't care for the Arizona Long-Suffering Cardinals, or they are struggling on a tight budget, or they don't want to go from one warm spot to another on a packaged priced at $3,200 per.

But the NFL marches on. "We're bullish on the Super Bowl and what it means to America," said a league spokesman while humming "The Star-Spangled Banner."

So, the NFL has introduced the $1,000 Super Bowl ticket.

But not the $50 hot dog.

Yet.

However, to show its concern for the economic plight, the league has reduced the tab on 1,000 tickets to $500.

Langford is trying to keep the cost of following his Steelers to the Super Bowl under $1,000. "I'm hoping to scam a cheap ticket. No Diamond Dolls (strip club) or big parties. I'll drink beer, eat wings and hang out on the beach."

Schlereth, the Broncos' former Pro Bowl guard who currently is an NFL Network analyst and a soap opera star, has played in and attended several Super Bowls — he owns three championship rings — and says he "can't believe it's so quiet and not crazy. I've never seen it like this. You wonder if the excitement will pick up."

I've been to a few Super Bowls — 30-plus, but I've stopped adding the Roman numerals — and downtown Tampa is not hopping like a Shriners convention or a dog show.

I found one 11-year-old boy wearing a Cardinals' sweat shirt. He lives in St. Petersburg. "I like the (Tampa Bay) Bucs. My dad made me wear this so I might get some Arizona players' autographs."

They should have invited the Broncos to play, or held the Super Bowl in Denver, which showed it could throw a party.

Woody Paige: 303-954-1095 or wpaige@denverpost.com

Chiefnj2
01-30-2009, 12:17 PM
I think a large part of the stadium will be rooting for the underdogs. I believe the NFL controls only about 25% of the seats and they give about 20% of that share to each team.

RippedmyFlesh
01-30-2009, 01:42 PM
perhaps the NFL is trying to forcibly create a cardinals fan base?
LMAO
Kind of like the "fans" China bused in for some of the Olympic events.

China admits using 'cheer squads' at Olympics
Chinese Olympic organisers today admitted to deploying “cheer squads” to create atmosphere and disguise blocks of empty seats in the sports venues.
The legions of spectators wearing matching yellow t-shirts and banging together oversized inflatable batons have been highly visible at the first sold-out Games.
Wang Wei, vice-president of the Beijing Olympic Organising Committee (Bocog) revealed they were volunteers shipped in to “create a good atmosphere” by cheering for both sides at team events.
The use of fake fans – on the back of an admission that the fireworks at the opening ceremony were touched up with special effects for TV - has caused consternation among real fans locked outside the stadiums.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/olympics/article4512306.ece

OnTheWarpath58
01-30-2009, 01:48 PM
"Worst experience at a Super Bowl I've ever had," said the self-proclaimed "biggest scalper in the country" as he drowned his sorrows at a downtown hotel bar. "For example," he slurred, "I got two on the 34-yard line, 17 rows up. In the past I could get $7,000 apiece for them kind of seats. I can't get a nibble at $3,000. I'm dying here."

Cry me a fucking river, you slimeball.

"WAH! I paid $1500 for 2 seats, and people won't buy at 4 times face value."

You're dying here?

Gimme a fucking break.

I hope you take a loss on them, you POS.

Nzoner
01-30-2009, 02:17 PM
Cry me a ****ing river, you slimeball.

"WAH! I paid $1500 for 2 seats, and people won't buy at 4 times face value."

You're dying here?

Gimme a ****ing break.

I hope you take a loss on them, you POS.


:clap:

I was fortunate enough to go to SB's XXII and XXVI and both times only paid $150 over face,which I was okay with,but these asshats are ridiculous.

HemiEd
01-30-2009, 02:20 PM
both of them.

Thig Lyfe
01-30-2009, 02:24 PM
both of them.

Will Leitch and Jon Hamm?

JuicesFlowing
01-30-2009, 02:48 PM
The Super Bowl isn't for fans.

Exactly. Why else would millions of people say, "I usually watch it for the commercials." Plus, the 30 minute "halftime extravaganza!!!!!" Ugh .....

aturnis
01-30-2009, 04:17 PM
The stadium will be full, of non fans. A lot of them who don't even follow pro football. The Super Bowl is an event that people LOVE to say they attended. I'm sure a good amount of tickets are held by corporations also.

thurman merman
01-30-2009, 04:32 PM
Cry me a ****ing river, you slimeball.

"WAH! I paid $1500 for 2 seats, and people won't buy at 4 times face value."

You're dying here?

Gimme a ****ing break.

I hope you take a loss on them, you POS.

that's what i was thinking. making $3000 on a ticket isnt exactly "dying."

stevieray
01-30-2009, 04:43 PM
the tickets two years ago were six bills each..and now they are up to 1000?

damn.

:shake:

OnTheWarpath58
01-30-2009, 04:53 PM
the tickets two years ago were six bills each..and now they are up to 1000?

damn.

:shake:

The highest priced ticket is $1000.

I think the lowest is $500.

DrRyan
01-30-2009, 05:39 PM
Home game for the Steelers? Riiiiiiight.:rolleyes: Because all the workers in the blue collar Steel city are doing well enough to be down there right now. As stated before, most of the tickets go to NFL corporate sponsor to do with as they see fit. I would be surprised to see more than 15% true fans for either team. People don't go to the Super Bowl for the game, but just to say they went(as was already stated).

KCChiefsMan
01-30-2009, 05:43 PM
who knows, it will probably be 50% of hardcore fans of both teams total and the other half will be rich people who probably don't care who wins

Deberg_1990
01-30-2009, 05:47 PM
Cardinals Football: A Tradition since December 2008

TEX
01-30-2009, 07:08 PM
Taking into account that the Cardinals didn't have any fans until a few weeks ago, and the Steelers have arguably the best fans in the NFL (and an impressive traveling fan base as well), this should pretty much feel like a home game for the Steelers. How many Cardinals fans do you think will be at the game?

3

Nzoner
01-30-2009, 10:26 PM
Exactly. Why else would millions of people say, "I usually watch it for the commercials." Plus, the 30 minute "halftime extravaganza!!!!!" Ugh .....

I gotta say though even though I'm a diehard fan of the game,that a 30 minute halftime of Bruce & The E Street Band is A-OK with me :thumb: