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View Full Version : Chiefs Props to da Mods for the DT tribute


mikeyis4dcats.
02-01-2009, 12:34 PM
look up
and over there ---------->

Count Zarth
02-01-2009, 12:35 PM
I wonder who made that. It's awesome.

Bacon Cheeseburger
02-01-2009, 12:42 PM
It's too bad that now every time I see the image of him sitting in the rain I think of that idiot DT58HOF.

Bowser
02-01-2009, 01:02 PM
It's too bad that now every time I see the image of him sitting in the rain I think of that idiot DT58HOF.

Typical Chiefs fan - finding the bad in everything good.









:D

unothadeal
02-01-2009, 01:03 PM
I wonder who made that. It's awesome.

Thanks.

Phobia
02-01-2009, 01:03 PM
I wonder who made that. It's awesome.

We need more threads about Clay.

Basileus777
02-01-2009, 01:05 PM
Thanks.

Well done sir.

Count Zarth
02-01-2009, 01:13 PM
We need more threads about Clay.

What do you know of clay?

Clay is a naturally occurring material composed primarily of fine-grained minerals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mineral), which show plasticity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasticity_%28physics%29) through a variable range of water content (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_content), and which can be hardened when dried and/or fired. Clay deposits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deposit_%28geology%29) are mostly composed of clay minerals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay_minerals) (phyllosilicate minerals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicate_minerals#Phyllosilicates)), minerals which impart plasticity and harden when fired and/or dried, and variable amounts of water trapped in the mineral structure by polar attraction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_polarity). Organic materials (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_material) which do not impart plasticity may also be a part of clay deposits.<sup id="cite_ref-guggenheim_0-0" class="reference">[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay#cite_note-guggenheim-0)</sup>
<sup id="cite_ref-guggenheim_0-0" class="reference">
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay#cite_note-guggenheim-0)</sup>
Clay minerals are typically formed over long periods of time by the gradual chemical weathering (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering) of rocks (usually silicate-bearing) by low concentrations of carbonic acid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonic_acid) and other diluted solvents (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvents). These solvents (usually acidic) migrate through the weathering rock after leaching (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaching) through upper weathered layers. In addition to the weathering process, some clay minerals are formed by hydrothermal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrothermal) activity. Clay deposits may be formed in place as residual deposits, but thick deposits usually are formed as the result of a secondary sedimentary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedimentary) deposition process after they have been eroded and transported from their original location of formation. Clay deposits are typically associated with very low energy depositional environments such as large lake and marine deposits.