PDA

View Full Version : Food and Drink Question for those with smoke houses..


mlyonsd
03-08-2009, 03:07 PM
Have you ever made dried beef in your smoker?

I'm in the middle of my first try and would appreciate any tips you found handy.

Stewie
03-08-2009, 03:47 PM
Wow! That's a big leap if you're a rookie. Did you not have anyone with experience helping you?

mlyonsd
03-08-2009, 03:57 PM
Wow! That's a big leap if you're a rookie. Did you not have anyone with experience helping you?

I have a buddy that makes dried venison and I thought it was pretty good. He put me on to the cure to use.

I figure by the ounce dried beef is about the most expensive kind of meat you can buy so I decided to try it myself.

You're right though, I should have probably asked the resident experts (Phobia) before attempting it.

Color Red
03-08-2009, 05:03 PM
Drying beef is a different game. That's kind of like using your microwave to toast bread. You can get a jerky machine if you want.

One problem is, good smoking is designed to keep moisture in your meat, and you obviously want to dry it.

Another problem is, and a question I would have is, managing the smoking element (taste) in the meat.

I assume you are using slices or single cuts of meat for drying which again, goes against the grain (no pun intended) of what you do with larger cuts or slabs of meat in a smoking process.

Then if you are asking a smoker who works at keeping his temperature low for smoking process that your goal now is to dry, I assume that changes the temperature management.

I have no idea what you are doing. Good luck. Send me some when you are done.

Phobia
03-08-2009, 05:09 PM
For the record, I'm not any kind of expert. There are several guys here more qualified than myself on all matters related to smoking.

That said, I don't have any idea how to dry beef in a smoker. I do know that beef absorbs smoke more readily than other meats so I would be selective about the harshness of the wood you select.

mlyonsd
03-08-2009, 05:48 PM
FTR I used a couple of beef rump roasts. My buddy put me on to a brown sugar cure that to the taste is more salty than sweelt I used it to make a liquid I injected and then made rubbed it with a dry portion.

It sat in the fridge for 8 days. The instructions I have say to put it on the smoker for 1 hour at 130 degrees, then add the wood and smoke it at 150-160 for 2-3 hours.

After 2 1/2 hour's I then closed the smoker down and cooked the roasts until they reached 155 internal.

You're supposed to let them sit out for an hour at room temp (which they are now).

They look fricking awesome btw. They are a bright red. Then you are supposed to recool them in the fridge and then slice.

Can't wait.

runnercyclist
03-08-2009, 07:20 PM
FTR I used a couple of beef rump roasts. My buddy put me on to a brown sugar cure that to the taste is more salty than sweelt I used it to make a liquid I injected and then made rubbed it with a dry portion.

It sat in the fridge for 8 days. The instructions I have say to put it on the smoker for 1 hour at 130 degrees, then add the wood and smoke it at 150-160 for 2-3 hours.

After 2 1/2 hour's I then closed the smoker down and cooked the roasts until they reached 155 internal.

You're supposed to let them sit out for an hour at room temp (which they are now).

They look fricking awesome btw. They are a bright red. Then you are supposed to recool them in the fridge and then slice.

Can't wait.

Keep us posted.

I assume you are using an electric smoker. I can imaging trying to maintain a temperature of 130 degrees in the WSM.

Extra Point
03-08-2009, 08:10 PM
Marinade sliced 3-4 lb. rump roast with 1/4 c. soy sauce and 1/4 c. Worcestershire in a ziploc in the fridge for a couple to three days, flipping it twice a day to distribute the marinade.

Remove the coal grate in your 22.5 in Weber kettle grill-- you don't need it. Start five briquets in your chimney to half-red stage, then place them in the very bottom of the kettlel. Place the ash catching disc of your Silver grill (or buy one if you have the Gold version) concave-side up on the half-red coals, bunched-not piled. Place on the cooking grate, place on meat slices, then sprinkle steak rub on the slices, and place the lid on the grill, with vents fully open on kettle bottom and lid.

After the first 45 minutes to an hour, remove the lid, remove the cooking grate, remove the ash pan, place five cold briquets on the burnt coals. Place on the cooking grate, flip the meat, season the other side of the slices, and place on the lid. You only need to season the slices on each side, once.

After each 45 minutes to an hour, remove the lid, remove the cooking grate, remove the ash pan, load 4-5 cold briquets, place the ash pan on the briquets, place on the cooking grate, flip the slices, and place on the lid. Takes 5-6 hours, depending on outside temp.

I invented/discovered this method this past July, when we had some decent heat outside, thinking the ash pan would make for a Hell of a great heat and smoke diffuser. Made three batches since. Haven't made jerky in the cold weather, though. It rained one time I made it, but didn't affect the outcome, as it finished raining over an hour before the stuff was done. Adding the number of briquets is dependent on the amount of hot coals after each interval.

It works!

mlyonsd
03-10-2009, 05:14 PM
Keep us posted.

I assume you are using an electric smoker. I can imaging trying to maintain a temperature of 130 degrees in the WSM.

I did use an electric smoker and I'd put up my dried beef up against anyone's....including Hormel or any other punk that wants to try.