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Amnorix
03-18-2009, 05:56 AM
There may have been extensive discussion on this already, and if so I apologize, but I thought the following was a useful summary of what happens if the NFL and the Player's Association don't enter into a new deal this year.

http://www.cincyjungle.com/2009/1/16/725767/q-and-a-about-the-nfl-s-up

Amnorix
03-18-2009, 05:57 AM
Q. When does the CBA expire should there be no extension to the agreement?

A. After the 2010 NFL season.

Q. Will there be a college draft in 2011?

A. Yes.

Q. What is the “Final League Year” in the current agreement?

A. The “Final League Year” is the term used in the CBA to refer to the last year of the agreement. Without a further extension of the CBA, the “Final League Year” would be the 2010 League Year.

Q. What are the differences between the “Final League Year” and any other “League Year?”

A. The principal differences are that in the “Final League Year,” there is no salary cap and there are substantial additional restrictions on player free agency.

Q. Now that 2009 is the last capped year, are there rules that impact player contract negotiations and a club’s salary cap planning?


A. Yes. Here are the key differences:

After the last game of the 2008 regular season, signing bonus proration is reduced from a maximum of six years to a maximum of five years.
In 2009, there is no June 1 rule for Signing Bonus acceleration. If a player is removed from the roster or his contract is assigned via waivers or trade at any time in the 2009 League Year, any unamortized signing bonus will be immediately included in Team Salary.
There is no year-end netting of incentives in 2009. Not-likely-to-be-earned incentives are charged to team salary immediately when earned, and likely-to-be-earned incentives are deducted when they are no longer possible to earn.
Guaranteed salary from 2010 and beyond is reallocated to capped years unless the entire 2009 salary is guaranteed.
50% of guaranteed salary in any League Year beyond 2012 is reallocated to capped years.
The 30% increase rule restricts salary increases from 2009 to 2010. For example: a player with a $500,000 Salary in 2009 would be limited to annual salary increases of $150,000 ($500,000 x 30%) beginning in 2010.
A team can include only three veteran team incentives in a player contract covering 2009 and beyond. These incentives must also be coupled with a playtime requirement. Previously, clubs were limited to eight team incentives and no playtime requirement.
Q. Are current player benefits affected in the uncapped year?

A. We expect player benefits to decline in the uncapped year. The union agreed that in the uncapped year, clubs would be relieved of their obligation to fund numerous benefit programs. Examples include second career savings (401K), player annuity, severance pay, and tuition assistance. The total league-wide contributions to such plans in 2009, the last capped year, are expected to be in excess of $225 million, or more than $7 million per club.

Q. What are the categories of free agents?

A. Players are either “restricted” or “unrestricted” free agents. Within these categories there are also “transition” and “franchise” players.

Q. What determines an unrestricted free agent in the uncapped year?

A. In capped seasons (2008 and 2009), a player whose contract has expired becomes an unrestricted free agent if he has four or more accrued seasons. In the uncapped year (2010), a player whose contract has expired becomes an unrestricted free agent only if he has six or more accrued seasons. An unrestricted free agent is free to sign with any club with no compensation owed to his old club.

Q. What determines whether a player is a restricted free agent in the “Final League Year?”

A.In capped seasons (2008 and 2009), a player whose contract expires becomes a restricted free agent if he has three accrued seasons. In the uncapped year (2010), a player whose contract expires becomes a restricted free agent if he has three, four or five accrued seasons. The rights of restricted free agents remain unchanged in the uncapped year.

Q. What constitutes an “accrued season?”

A. Six or more regular-season games on a club’s active/inactive, reserved-injured or physically unable to perform lists.

Q. In addition to the right to designate a Franchise (or Transition) Player each capped year, can clubs designate additional players in the uncapped year?

A. Yes, one additional player can be tagged. In capped years (2008 and 2009), a club may designate a Franchise Player or a Transition Player. In the uncapped year (2010), a club may designate one additional Transition Player. A Transition Player must be offered a minimum of the average of the top 10 salaries of the prior season at the player’s position or 120 percent of the player’s previous year’s salary, whichever is greater. A Transition Player designation gives the club a first-refusal right to match within seven days an offer sheet given to the player by another club after his contract expires. If the club matches, it retains the player. If it does not match, it receives no compensation.

Q.What determines a Franchise Player?

A. A club can designate one franchise player in any given year. The type of franchise player depends on the amount of the old club’s offer. An “exclusive” franchise player – not free to sign with another club – must be offered a minimum of the average of the top five salaries at the player’s position for the current year as of a predetermined date (April 18, in 2008), or 120 percent of the player’s previous year’s salary, or the average of the top five salaries at his position as of the end of last season – whichever of the three is greatest. If the player is offered a minimum of the average of the top five salaries of last season at his position, or 120 percent of the player’s previous year’s salary, he becomes a “non-exclusive” franchise player and can negotiate with other clubs. His old club can match a new club’s offer, or receive two first-round draft choices if it decides not to match the new club’s offer.

Q. What is the Final Eight Plan?

A. During the uncapped year, the eight clubs that make the divisional playoffs in the previous season have additional restrictions that limit their ability to sign Unrestricted Free Agents from other clubs. In general, the four clubs participating in the Championship Games are limited in the number of free agents that they may sign; the limit is determined by the number of their own free agents signing with other clubs. For the four clubs that lose in the Divisional playoffs, in addition to having the ability to sign free agents based on the number of their own free agents signing with other clubs, they may also sign players based on specific financial parameters.

Q. Is there an Entering Player Pool in the uncapped year?

A. There may be. The CBA provides that the league has the unilateral right to make that determination in an uncapped year.

Q. Is there a Minimum Team Salary in the uncapped year?

A. There is no Minimum Team Salary in the uncapped year. The Minimum Team Salary in 2008 is $100,224,000, meaning each team is required to spend $100 million this year on player costs (not including benefits). The team salary cap in 2008 is $116 million.

Q. Are there individual player minimum salaries in the uncapped year?

A. Yes, but they rise at a rate somewhat slower than player minimum salaries rise in capped years.

joemama
03-18-2009, 07:24 AM
The Redskins and Cowboys will become the Yankees and Red Sox of the NFL.

Hog Farmer
03-18-2009, 07:29 AM
It means signatures can be altered without written consent of the user.

Amnorix
03-18-2009, 07:35 AM
The Redskins and Cowboys will become the Yankees and Red Sox of the NFL.

I wonder. I'm not sure how it would work. The reason the Yankees and Red Sox are so absurdly rich is local TV contracts. In the NFL, that's not a problem.

So I guess it falls back on how rich the owners are, and how deep they're willing to dig. Irsay and the Colts would be scrweed, as would Wilson and the Bills.

Patriots are very high revenue, and Kraft is loaded so we'd be fine. Does Allen still own the Seahawks? He could buy the entire NFL he's so rich...

But the real point is that in 2010 there is a LIMIT on signing free agents. Then after 2010 the CBA ends.

Deberg_1990
03-18-2009, 07:39 AM
The Chiefs and Packers would become the Royals and Pirates of the NFL.

soundmind
03-18-2009, 08:58 AM
The saying, "any given sunday" will not apply anymore. It'll become this funny little anecdote that analysts use when the Royals.....er, Chiefs actually pull off a win against someone like the Jets or the Patriots.....consider parity in the league to be a thing of the past.

You could probably go ahead and predict 2015 team salaries as such:

Green Bay, Kansas City, Jacksonville: $70M
New York Teams, Pats, Skins, Cowboys: $180M

No player will ever sign a long term deal with a small market. Won't be a rea$on to. And you'll watch icons like Arrowhead fall the way of the K after a few years.....it's okay though, America is over. We're just wading in our own sewage.

KCChiefsFan88
03-18-2009, 10:22 AM
Even without a salary cap, I don't think there will be the same inequity that exists in Major League Baseball. The biggest factor preventing that is the major difference in revenue sharing... all NFL teams share one league-wide TV contract while in MLB there are large individual TV contracts such as YES Network for the Yankees.

The biggest source of team revenue that is not currently shared is stadium revenue and the Chiefs with a newly renovated Arrowhead stadium should be in relatively good shape in that regard.

vailpass
03-18-2009, 10:45 AM
Thanks for the post Ammo, that is good data.

IMHO The NFLPA needs to be ready to make concessions regarding salary ceiling for new draft picks, salary cap, and revenue sharing from new stadium proceeds.

The owners need to be ready to maintain the revenue sharing between teams that allows small market teams to remain competitive, and be flexible enough to come to terms with the NFLPA.

There needs to be some adjustments but both sides have to solidify a deal so they don't kill the biggest golden goose in sports and a scenario similar to that described above by Soundmind occurs.

ChiefsCountry
03-18-2009, 10:48 AM
Really the only owners in the NFL who spend like idiots is Jerry Jones and Daniel Snyder in the big markets. The rest of the big market owners are fairly conservative when it comes to spending. Look at the Giants, Pats, Jets, etc.

DeezNutz
03-18-2009, 10:48 AM
It means signatures can be altered without written consent of the user.

Fuck that shit. I'm outta here.

'Hamas' Jenkins
03-18-2009, 11:44 AM
People aren't going to go on batshit spending sprees, they are going to use the year to rid themselves of all their toxic contracts.

tonyetony
03-18-2009, 12:10 PM
What Happens if 2010 is Uncapped
Dan Snyder may or may not finally buy himself a playoff win and there will be some grossly overpaid free agents landing in DC. Nothing different really.

Amnorix
03-18-2009, 12:16 PM
People aren't going to go on batshit spending sprees, they are going to use the year to rid themselves of all their toxic contracts.

This isn't 1999. Most teams don't have that many toxic contracts. The best run teams manage their cap, not let their cap manage them. Even the worst teams aren't making the mistakes alot of teams made 10 or so years ago, when they didn't understand the cap like they do now.

FAX
03-18-2009, 01:06 PM
I thought you left.

FAX

FringeNC
03-18-2009, 01:14 PM
Contrary to popular mythology, there is more, not less competitive balance in baseball than there used to be.

Owners want to abandon the salary cap because the associated salary floor is a joke.

Amnorix
03-18-2009, 03:19 PM
I thought you left.

FAX

Not so much...

Amnorix
03-18-2009, 03:21 PM
Contrary to popular mythology, there is more, not less competitive balance in baseball than there used to be.

Owners want to abandon the salary cap because the associated salary floor is a joke.

You're wrong. The owners want to keep the cap. Very much so. The floor/salary system strains a few owners, but not many, and the owners very much like having a structured budget system.

But there are problems with what is in/out of the cap calculation, and a number of other issues separating the two sides.

If you have any support for the statement that the owners want to abandon the cap, I'd love to see it because I haven't seen anybody report that.

beach tribe
03-18-2009, 03:26 PM
I'm pretty sure these guys are not dumb enough to let this happen. At least not any longer than 1 season. I actually see them working it out though.