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View Full Version : Life SWEET!!! I'm a college graduate!


ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 09:26 AM
As of Sunday, I became a college graduate; I've earned my Bachelor's in Computer Science from Capella University (capella.edu (http://www.capella.edu)). And with the current state of the economy, I am DAMN glad I decided to take this step almost 3 years ago.

Is anyone else here currently or recently enrolled and working on a degree? I found it to be a great experience. It sounds like enrollment in online universities by working adults has skyrocketed over the last 6 months:

CNN link (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/03/18/economy.online.degrees/index.html)

Z

DaFace
03-18-2009, 09:26 AM
Congrats man.

Deberg_1990
03-18-2009, 09:27 AM
Congrats man!

Katipan
03-18-2009, 09:33 AM
Very cool.

Reaper16
03-18-2009, 09:40 AM
Is anyone else here currently or recently enrolled and working on a degree?
I'll graduate on May 2nd.

Lzen
03-18-2009, 09:40 AM
I was thinking of doing this very thing. Any advice on the best way to get this ball rolling?

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 09:41 AM
I'll graduate on May 2nd.

from where and a degree in what?

DaKCMan AP
03-18-2009, 09:42 AM
Awesome, congrats!

Sam Hall
03-18-2009, 09:42 AM
My advice is go to graduate school if you can't find a job within the next couple months. Stay in school until the storm ends.

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 09:44 AM
Congrats dude. The next challenge is landing a job.
Posted via Mobile Device

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 09:45 AM
I was thinking of doing this very thing. Any advice on the best way to get this ball rolling?


Kinda depends on what you want a degree in. Different colleges specialize in different degree fields. My school does computer science and business degrees. My wife is actually working on getting a Master's in Psychology from an online university as well.

They all offer financial assistance, to my knowledge. I highly recommend taking the step!

Z

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 09:48 AM
I was thinking of doing this very thing. Any advice on the best way to get this ball rolling?

Find a program, talk to an advisor, apply and enroll. That's pretty much the process.

What type of program are you looking to get into?
Posted via Mobile Device

Simply Red
03-18-2009, 09:52 AM
props

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 09:53 AM
Congrats dude. The next challenge is landing a job.
Posted via Mobile Device

Fortunately, I've already got a great job in IT and have over 10 yrs' experience in the field. I mainly did it for better job security and a better salary. Almost every open position in my field requires a Bachelor's, so after I got laid off in 2005 I decided I had no choice but to go back to school...

Saulbadguy
03-18-2009, 09:53 AM
I'm graduating may 9th. :) Grats.

petegz28
03-18-2009, 09:53 AM
Gratz to ya!

MITCH
03-18-2009, 09:55 AM
congrats.. I know you from WFC from a few years back. Glad to hear the good news. I have same degree from USM in Leav. KS (1992) I would not recommend graduate school but continued hands-on experience. If you find time it would be best to have Security Plus, CISCO or other additional certs. You want degree, experience and certs in almost all jobs today. Experience will allow you to build a foundation for graduate school. It seems that $ for graduate school may not pay off with business cutting back on IT spending.

StcChief
03-18-2009, 09:56 AM
Dude congrats.... To help land a position....
build some piece of software, web, mid-tier and Database to show employers...

Get a cert in something that you like in field. (A+,Cisco, Microsoft, Oracle)... You never a difference maker, you'll compete with vets for jobs.

Tough out here now....
stay up on things in field
good luck

RedThat
03-18-2009, 09:57 AM
As of Sunday, I became a college graduate; I've earned my Bachelor's in Computer Science from Capella University (capella.edu (http://www.capella.edu)). And with the current state of the economy, I am DAMN glad I decided to take this step almost 3 years ago.

Is anyone else here currently or recently enrolled and working on a degree? I found it to be a great experience. It sounds like enrollment in online universities by working adults has skyrocketed over the last 6 months:

CNN link (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/03/18/economy.online.degrees/index.html)

Z

Awesome man. Congratulations to you!! That is great. You have my best wishes and may God Bless you in that regard.

I bet it was a good decision especially with the condition of the economy. Not only that, but you've acquired knowledge, and credentials in which NOBODY can take away from you. There are always going to be computers in this life, economy or no economy at least you know now that you're in that field where you will be surrounded by lots of different job opportunities. Possibly some longevity and stability as well? I hope someone will hire you and give you a chance to learn and develop some skills that will be useful for you.

*Im not working on a degree right now, although, I will be in the future? Im currently working on getting into university first, because I don't have the specific prerequisites required to enroll into the program I wish to apply to. My plan is to get in in about a years time from now. I just have to take some adult night school courses first, which Im currently doing and get some credits before I can declare myself as "elible" to enroll.

To be honest, Im not into online learning. Id rather just do things the old fashioned way by going to class listening to what the prof has to say, and taking notes. I learn better that way, and you feel better because you always know you have someone there who can explain things for you if you don't understand rather then learning and doing things independantly on your own. It's just a different feeling simply put. I feel a little thing like that makes a world of a difference to me. But everybody has their way and preference.

Radar Chief
03-18-2009, 10:02 AM
Congrats. Good for you. :thumb:

Reaper16
03-18-2009, 10:04 AM
from where and a degree in what?
Northwest Missouri State University. B.A. in English.

Then its on to grad school (if I can get appropriate funding in this economy).

Congratulations, btw.

Reaper16
03-18-2009, 10:05 AM
I'm graduating may 9th. :) Grats.
Hell yeeeeaaaah.

BigRedChief
03-18-2009, 10:06 AM
Dude congrats.... To help land a position....
build some piece of software, web, mid-tier and Database to show employers...

Get a cert in something that you like in field. (A+,Cisco, Microsoft, Oracle)... You never a difference maker, you'll compete with vets for jobs.

Tough out here now....
stay up on things in field
good luck
Entry level jobs are hard to come by. Too much supply and not enough demand. Very tough field to get started in these days.

Congrats on the degree :clap:

But on the other hand I don't even have an associates degree in computer science and I turned down a $135,000 tech job in Washington yesterday.

bkkcoh
03-18-2009, 10:06 AM
Congrats, now go out and get a job so you can pay your share of taxes.... :toast:

Rooster
03-18-2009, 10:07 AM
Congrats........Now Get To Work!!!!! :D

Lzen
03-18-2009, 10:07 AM
Kinda depends on what you want a degree in. Different colleges specialize in different degree fields. My school does computer science and business degrees. My wife is actually working on getting a Master's in Psychology from an online university as well.

They all offer financial assistance, to my knowledge. I highly recommend taking the step!

Z

Find a program, talk to an advisor, apply and enroll. That's pretty much the process.

What type of program are you looking to get into?
Posted via Mobile Device

I am interested in computer science. I guess that is what you would call it. I think networking or programming would be something that would be a good fit for me. I am pretty good (for just an average Joe) with computers. Pretty good with numbers. Also, I am good with Excel. Saul and I discussed this awhile back. He suggested .html, vb.net, or any .NET stuff.

I guess I don't know where would be the best place for me to take courses. Is there something that can be all online? Or do you have to attend actual classes regularly? With a full time job and kids, you can see how that might make things more difficult. And how much time do they give you to complete a course? Just trying to get an idea of the time investment.

Also, I was thinking of waiting until fall to enroll. Life seems to always get kind of busy for me in the summertime.

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 10:10 AM
I was thinking of doing this very thing. Any advice on the best way to get this ball rolling?

Hey, here's something else to look into. You can petition and CLEP out of many of your required credits so that you don't have to take certain courses (which of course means that you don't have to pay for them).

Petitioning is when you can prove to the school that you have equivalent experience in a required subject. For instance, I petitioned out of Web Design, Image Processing, etc., things that I had tons of examples to show them. It cost $450 per course to petition, but that's better than the roughly 2 grand and 10 weeks' time to take that course.

Then there's CLEP testing. Most colleges allow a certain amount of CLEP credits for Gen Ed courses. Basically, you study up for subjects, like History, Natural Science, Literature, etc., and then go to a supporting local college to take a 90-minute CLEP test on that subject. You only have to get half the answers right to achieve the credit for that course. Each test cost about $85, but again, then you don't have to take the time and $$$ to take the actual course.

NOTE: in both cases, you better know the subject matter very well; those fees are non-refundable whether you pass the test or not.

A Bachelor's at my college is 180 credits. Thru petitioning and CLEP testing, I earned 66 credits- over a third of my degree. It saved me about a year's time and around $20,000 in tuition.

EDIT: also, many companies will pay for some or all of an employee's tuition if it pertains to their job. My company paid $5,250/yr as long as I got at least a B for that subject.

Just some very helpful info for those contemplating going back to school.

Z

Lzen
03-18-2009, 10:11 AM
Oh yeah, congrats to Zep, Saul, and Reaper.

Dicky McElephant
03-18-2009, 10:11 AM
Congrats.

I'm 6 months away from getting my Bachelors in Web Design from Westwood College Online.

BigRedChief
03-18-2009, 10:19 AM
I am interested in computer science. I guess that is what you would call it. I think networking or programming would be something that would be a good fit for me. I am pretty good (for just an average Joe) with computers. Pretty good with numbers. Also, I am good with Excel. Saul and I discussed this awhile back. He suggested .html, vb.net, or any .NET stuff.

I guess I don't know where would be the best place for me to take courses. Is there something that can be all online? Or do you have to attend actual classes regularly? With a full time job and kids, you can see how that might make things more difficult. And how much time do they give you to complete a course? Just trying to get an idea of the time investment.

Also, I was thinking of waiting until fall to enroll. Life seems to always get kind of busy for me in the summertime.
There are no entry level jobs in programming right now. They shipped those jobs overseas where they can pay $5K a year. You need to find a place that is hard to outsource, a trusted position that they want in the building not in some offshore data center. Networking, app admin, security etc.

I worked full time and went to school 2 nights a week and all day Saturday for 2 years. Got home at 10:00 pm and studied till 2:00 am and got back up at 6:00am to do it all over again. Paid my own way. But like I said 6 years later I can turn down $135K jobs.

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 10:22 AM
I guess I don't know where would be the best place for me to take courses. Is there something that can be all online? Or do you have to attend actual classes regularly? With a full time job and kids, you can see how that might make things more difficult. And how much time do they give you to complete a course? Just trying to get an idea of the time investment.

Also, I was thinking of waiting until fall to enroll. Life seems to always get kind of busy for me in the summertime.

100% of my college was online. I've never physically met one student or professor. All discussion (and there's a lot of that) is done via forum (so you kniow you'd be good with that. :)) Each week was laid out with assigments that were due the following week, but you could do those assigments at any time or day you choose. I typicallly did mine after the kids went to bed- usually from 9pm to 1am. You don't get alot of sleep, of course.

HTML isn't enough to know anymore. .NET, Java, Cold Fusion are all good. I specialized in more of a design-oriented mode(Flash, Photoshop, Dreamweaver), but even so, I'm learning Actionscript 3.0, a hot OOP language. I'm also learning Flex, which uses Actionscript 3.0 and XMXL.

Just research a few colleges to see which offers you the best fit and courses for you....

Z

Der Flöprer
03-18-2009, 10:50 AM
Congratulations, and enjoy that extra half a million dollars you'll make that non college educated folks won't have. You've earned it.

Pablo
03-18-2009, 11:06 AM
Congrats.

I'll be graduating May 9th from Missouri Western State University with a B.S. in Economics. Can't wait.

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 11:11 AM
I am interested in computer science. I guess that is what you would call it. I think networking or programming would be something that would be a good fit for me. I am pretty good (for just an average Joe) with computers. Pretty good with numbers. Also, I am good with Excel. Saul and I discussed this awhile back. He suggested .html, vb.net, or any .NET stuff.

I guess I don't know where would be the best place for me to take courses. Is there something that can be all online? Or do you have to attend actual classes regularly? With a full time job and kids, you can see how that might make things more difficult. And how much time do they give you to complete a course? Just trying to get an idea of the time investment.

Also, I was thinking of waiting until fall to enroll. Life seems to always get kind of busy for me in the summertime.

I really don't know too much about computer courses. I did work at the distance ed department in Emporia and there are a lot of options out there. My advice would be to find a program you want and just call them. Tuition is how they get paid, so it's not like they won't talk to you. Just line out what all you need and then get started.

Another thing to ask about is the format of the classes some have required meeting times for webcast lectures or walkthroughs, others just have assignments with due dates. Just something to keep in mind.

I don't know anything about what you have or may need, I know if you are needing gen ed classes, Kaned is a collaboration of Kansas community colleges that offers the gen ed classes online. If you can pound some of those out while taking a few lower level classes for your degree, it might expedite things for you.
I know there is financial aide and all the regular stuff for online classes also. But if you can get your employer to foot the bill, that is most certainly the best.

The biggest thing is to just get started and don't quit. It does take a lot of time, and there will be times that you will think wtf am I doing this for, but its a relatively short period of time in terms of your whole life.

Let me know if there is anything I can help you with.
Posted via Mobile Device

Skip Towne
03-18-2009, 11:19 AM
Congrats you guys. It takes a lot of effort it looks like. I wouldn't want to be young with no degree the way things are now.

PhillyChiefFan
03-18-2009, 11:22 AM
Congrats! Thats awesome!

GoHuge
03-18-2009, 11:23 AM
I graduate with my MBA in December. Looking forward to finally being completely done with school.

BigRedChief
03-18-2009, 11:38 AM
Fortunately, I've already got a great job in IT and have over 10 yrs' experience in the field. I mainly did it for better job security and a better salary. Almost every open position in my field requires a Bachelor's, so after I got laid off in 2005 I decided I had no choice but to go back to school...
I disagree here with the need for a college degree. If you want to get into management? then yes a degree is needed. But if you want to just be a techie or lead a team of techies then not having a degree isn't a hinderance at all. Evey job I've had in the last 4 years has had a 4 year degree as a requirement but I've still got the job because they take my experience as replacement for the 4 year degree. but that doesn't really apply to a n00b wanting an entry job though.

vailpass
03-18-2009, 11:39 AM
Way to go. It's a jungle out there and you will now be hunting jobs with a rifle instead of a spear.
Not to say that those who don't have a college degree but do have experience aren't also rifle equipped. They are.
No college and no experience is spear hunting IMHO.

DaKCMan AP
03-18-2009, 11:40 AM
I graduate with my MBA in December. Looking forward to finally being completely done with school.

Did you go straight through to get your MBA or did you work for a while and go back?

BigRedChief
03-18-2009, 11:42 AM
Way to go. It's a jungle out there and you will now be hunting jobs with a rifle instead of a spear.
Not to say that those who don't have a college degree but do have experience aren't also rifle equipped. They are.
No college and no experience is spear hunting IMHO.
No college and no experience you are DOA.

Technical Certifications may help you get looked at by HR and land you an interview but you will be grilled on the tech stuff to see if you braindumped the exam. Certs are no longer a good rifle anymore just another weapon to slay the unemployment beast.

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 11:51 AM
I disagree here with the need for a college degree. If you want to get into management? then yes a degree is needed. But if you want to just be a techie or lead a team of techies then not having a degree isn't a hinderance at all. Evey job I've had in the last 4 years has had a 4 year degree as a requirement but I've still got the job because they take my experience as replacement for the 4 year degree. but that doesn't really apply to a n00b wanting an entry job though.

Yeah, I agree the level of experience is pretty huge as well. I got the job I have now based solely on experience. I suppose you could look at a degree as another important weapon in your arsenal...

Z

J Diddy
03-18-2009, 11:51 AM
Congratulations.

vailpass
03-18-2009, 11:55 AM
No college and no experience you are DOA.

Technical Certifications may help you get looked at by HR and land you an interview but you will be grilled on the tech stuff to see if you braindumped the exam. Certs are no longer a good rifle anymore just another weapon to slay the unemployment beast.

When I worked in the corporate world supporting a team that built sigint architecture platforms all of the positions we had required "a bachelor's degree in appropriate field or equivalent experience".

Translation: if you are a real-time embedded software developer with Linux experience we don't care where you learned it as long as you learned it well.

GoHuge
03-18-2009, 12:21 PM
Did you go straight through to get your MBA or did you work for a while and go back?I worked for about five years before I started back. I've continued to work full time while getting the MBA and it's kicking my ass!! Can't wait to be done. I just got tired of working for people that weren't as smart or as talented as me. The only way to get around them was to get a higher degree. It will also open up so many more opportunities and make me more marketable. I hope to never work in a place I'm not happy at again.

BigRedChief
03-18-2009, 12:31 PM
I worked for about five years before I started back. I've continued to work full time while getting the MBA and it's kicking my ass!! Can't wait to be done. I just got tired of working for people that weren't as smart or as talented as me. The only way to get around them was to get a higher degree. It will also open up so many more opportunities and make me more marketable. I hope to never work in a place I'm not happy at again.
Know that feeling all to well.:(

CoMoChief
03-18-2009, 12:33 PM
I worked as a customer serv rep for MBS books. I handled MANY MANY book orders for you and your classmates more than likely.

Most of the time you couldnt sell your books back either, because a lot of times Capella Univ would use a newer version of the book almost every yr.

Your school was contracted thru MBS. And you prob paid a shit load for your books. Capella and Strayer Univ were our biggest customers.

tonyetony
03-18-2009, 12:36 PM
Congrats. Now go get a job related to the upgrade in medical record keeping, be happy, buy everything you want for the next 30 years and retire.

Iowanian
03-18-2009, 12:37 PM
Congratulations.

Now a question.

How seriously do employers actually take these online degrees?

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 12:48 PM
Congratulations.

Now a question.

How seriously do employers actually take these online degrees?

What I hear alot is that getting a Bachelor's online is fine and well worth it, but a Master's online- not so much so. Not sure why the distinction, but this is according to the CNN link in the thread starter:

"For those considering a virtual classroom, a career expert advises against seeking an MBA or other graduate degrees as a way to jump-start a career during the economic slump, but says completing a bachelor's degree online may be helpful.

"If you haven't finished your undergraduate degree, that's a good idea, because it doesn't actually matter where you have your degree from, unless it's a top 20 school," said Penelope Trunk, author of 'Brazen Careerist: The New Rules for Success.' An undergraduate degree is kind of like a ticket to play in corporate America."

Z

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 01:10 PM
Congratulations.

Now a question.

How seriously do employers actually take these online degrees?

I think it depends on the field. Emporia State did a FUCK ASS TON of Masters' online. But AACSB doesn't like online business stuff.

DaKCMan AP
03-18-2009, 01:22 PM
I worked for about five years before I started back. I've continued to work full time while getting the MBA and it's kicking my ass!! Can't wait to be done. I just got tired of working for people that weren't as smart or as talented as me. The only way to get around them was to get a higher degree. It will also open up so many more opportunities and make me more marketable. I hope to never work in a place I'm not happy at again.

What was your undergrad degree in? I already have a graduate degree and have no interest in a PhD but might eventually go back for a MBA (preferably on the company dime). I know some others who have/are completed their MBA while maintaining their full time job and they said 35-40hrs a week are spent on the degree. Is that accurate for you?

Mr. Kotter
03-18-2009, 01:38 PM
Congrats, ZepSinger :toast:

KcFanInGA
03-18-2009, 02:22 PM
Just started this year myself. Congrats to you friend.

FAX
03-18-2009, 02:28 PM
Congratulations, Mr. ZepSinger. I'm very happy for and proud of you. Well done.

Now, you should go for your Masters.

FAX

CrazyPhuD
03-18-2009, 02:31 PM
I am interested in computer science. I guess that is what you would call it. I think networking or programming would be something that would be a good fit for me. I am pretty good (for just an average Joe) with computers. Pretty good with numbers. Also, I am good with Excel. Saul and I discussed this awhile back. He suggested .html, vb.net, or any .NET stuff.

I guess I don't know where would be the best place for me to take courses. Is there something that can be all online? Or do you have to attend actual classes regularly? With a full time job and kids, you can see how that might make things more difficult. And how much time do they give you to complete a course? Just trying to get an idea of the time investment.

Also, I was thinking of waiting until fall to enroll. Life seems to always get kind of busy for me in the summertime.

So the big question is what do you want to do? Do you want to develop software? System administrator? NEtwork admin etc? Each of these has a varying degree of college requirements. Some of require more experience than degrees.

A traditional CS degree(I'm not sure if the online ones are the same), is more about writing good algorithms, data structures, and programming styles(ala object oriented, etc...). They will expose you to specific languages some of which are hot but the point is not generally to learn a language it's to learn how to write good code(i.e. fast, efficient, well designed). Additionally you will have the oppurtunity to understand how certain pieces of computer systems work, from networking protocols, to cpu architectures. The initial classes are generally relatively high level and are there to expose you to a topic and deeper classes go into more depth.

That said a good CS degree isn't going to train you for a specific job, what it will do is expose you to how the system works, teach you how to analyze it, and teach you how to develop well designed software. The rest you learn through experience once you get into the field. Education is great but it is also no substitute for actually developing systems. You shouldn't be too concerned about learning a specific language when you study. It's ideal to learn on the language you think you'll use, but what is critical is code/algorithm design and critical thinking. If you get that down you can pick up any language by learning the syntax. They are all fairly similar.

Questions for you to ask.

What is it that you want to do?
What programming language are most of the coding classes taught(i.e. do you want to learn that? C/C++/Java is always safe, everything else depends upon how useful it is to what you want to do.)
What are the core courses and what are the electives. Do they have a track in the specialty you want to learn? How deep is that track?

While not 100% required if you know what you want to do you'll be better off if you do. You can still change if you find something you like better but it's harder and can take more time.

If you have questions about the CS degree process feel free to ask either here or through PMs. I've been on both sides as a student and as a teacher in grad school(I have a PhD in CS/CE).

CrazyPhuD
03-18-2009, 02:34 PM
And Congrats ZepSinger.

I've always been a bit skeptical about online degree but I will say I think CS is one of the ones that is the closest to in classroom teaching.

You definitely don't need to be in class. I just always wonder if the teaching is the same. I actually really enjoyed teaching and there are just some parts of it that don't 100% translate to a distance learning compared to an in person experience.

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 02:39 PM
What was your undergrad degree in? I already have a graduate degree and have no interest in a PhD but might eventually go back for a MBA (preferably on the company dime). I know some others who have/are completed their MBA while maintaining their full time job and they said 35-40hrs a week are spent on the degree. Is that accurate for you?

It depends on how many hours you take. I took mine while working full time. It wasn't terrible. If I were you I'd budget a couple hours per week per credit hour outside of class. My MBA program had night classes so I could work during the day. I pounded it pretty hard and got it done in a year and a half (36 hours). But at my university, the classes were applicable towards a degree for 7 years, so you can take your time if you want.

IIRC, your degree is in engineering? You may be required to take a few undergraduate prerequisite courses (Likely accounting and finance). So keep that in mind too.

If I were you I'd find someone that is in the program and ask them what the time requirements for each class are. In my experience, the time required varied greatly from class to class.
Posted via Mobile Device

DaKCMan AP
03-18-2009, 02:44 PM
It depends on how many hours you take. I took mine while working full time. It wasn't terrible. If I were you I'd budget a couple hours per week per credit hour outside of class. My MBA program had night classes so I could work during the day. I pounded it pretty hard and got it done in a year and a half (36 hours). But at my university, the classes were applicable towards a degree for 7 years, so you can take your time if you want.

IIRC, your degree is in engineering? You may be required to take a few undergraduate prerequisite courses (Likely accounting and finance). So keep that in mind too.

If I were you I'd find someone that is in the program and ask them what the time requirements for each class are. In my experience, the time required varied greatly from class to class.
Posted via Mobile Device

I'd likely do the MBA program at Florida where they have a distance option. Classes/projects are online and you meet in Gainesville on weekends I think once or twice per month. Yes, engineering but I don't think there are any prereqs. I have a friend who's doing the program and she says it takes anywhere from 30-40 hours per week from her schedule. Just wondering if others have similar time commitments.

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 02:47 PM
I'd likely do the MBA program at Florida where they have a distance option. Classes/projects are online and you meet in Gainesville on weekends I think once or twice per month. Yes, engineering but I don't think there are any prereqs. I have a friend who's doing the program and she says it takes anywhere from 30-40 hours per week from her schedule. Just wondering if others have similar time commitments.

Well, if she's taking 9 hours, thatd put her at about 20 hours commitment outside of "class" so that would be consistent with what I suggested.

Some are more. I had a marketing class that could take 15-20 hours by itself. Others were more focused on lectures and tests, so there wasn't as much time commitment.
Posted via Mobile Device

Buehler445
03-18-2009, 02:50 PM
Honestly, I'd suggest that anyone who is interested go and get their MBA. There is a lot of good knowledge to be gained if you put in the effort. Beyond just the monetary incentive to do so.
Posted via Mobile Device

ZepSinger
03-18-2009, 08:28 PM
Congratulations, Mr. ZepSinger. I'm very happy for and proud of you. Well done.

Now, you should go for your Masters.

FAX

Funny you should mention that... I'm actually thinking about doing that very thing... :)

FAX
03-18-2009, 09:48 PM
Funny you should mention that... I'm actually thinking about doing that very thing... :)

I definitely think you should consider it, Mr. ZepSinger. My rationale is that, once you're in the flow of school, it's easier to stay with it. Sometimes, when you leave school, it becomes much more difficult to get things going again.

And, of course, a Masters is nice to have on your wall. For a lot of reasons.

FAX