PDA

View Full Version : Misc Special Olympics takes on use of 'R-word'


Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 08:16 PM
I know everyone knows my distaste for the use of the word, so I thought I would post this. Thank you for reading.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/03/20/obama.special.olympics/index.html


Special Olympics takes on use of 'R-word'

CNN) -- An unexpected and sudden spotlight on the Special Olympics, an organization that for more than 40 years has served and honored those with intellectual disabilities, comes less than two weeks before the nonprofit launches a new campaign: Spread the Word to the End the Word.

March 31 is being billed a "national day of awareness," a call to Americans to recognize and rethink their use of the word "retard," or as the organization would prefer, the "R-word."

"Most people don't think of this word as hate speech, but that's exactly what it feels like to millions of people with intellectual disabilities, their families and friends," a statement about the campaign reads. "This word is just as cruel and offensive as any other slur."

The push for increased respect is being spearheaded by young people who are collecting pledges or vows to not use the word at http://www.r-word.org/, and are leading online discussions on how people can get involved in this cause.

So far, across the country, 300 schools have already committed to hosting rallies on March 31, Special Olympics President and CEO J. Brady Lum said.

An aggressive print and online campaign, targeting people ages 18 to 30, will follow, said Kirsten Suto Seckler, who directs the organization's global brand marketing and awareness.

The ads designed by BBDO New York, will challenge the public -- with language meant to raise eyebrows -- to think about the issue more deeply. The campaign uses slurs against Asians, homosexuals, Jews and African-Americans to make the point that language can be harmful to all groups, including people with intellectual disabilities.

Attention on the Special Olympics skyrocketed Thursday when, in a quick and clearly unscripted moment, President Obama exhibited the power of words during his history-making visit with Jay Leno.

While joking on The Tonight Show about his bowling prowess (during last year's campaign trail he shamefully scored 37 in a game), Obama said he'd been practicing at the White House.

He told Leno that he bowled 129 in the White House bowling alley and said his bowling skills are "like Special Olympics or something."

The comment during the taping of the show prompted Obama to pick up the phone on Air Force One and call Special Olympics Chairman Timothy Shriver to preemptively apologize for the remark before it hit television screens. He also reportedly invited Special Olympic athletes to Pennsylvania Avenue to hit the lanes and give him tips or shoot some hoops.

The president "expressed his heartfelt and sincere commitment to work with our athletes and make this country a more accepting place for people with special needs," Lum, the organization's president, said.

What Obama said on The Tonight Show adds to the discussion that's needed to raise awareness and has proven "an incredibly important and seriously teachable moment," Lum said.

From playgrounds to the "top rungs of our leadership, including our president," he said Americans have plenty to talk about and learn when it comes to stereotypes and how words can sting.


mmaddog
*******

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 08:22 PM
nothing to get bent out of shape over.

Jenson71
03-22-2009, 08:26 PM
I remember how often "retard" was said to people when I was in high school just a few years ago. "You're retarded ... That's retarded." I never hear it anymore. I think most just grow out of using it.

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 08:27 PM
I remember how often "retard" was said to people when I was in high school just a few years ago. "You're retarded ... That's retarded." I never hear it anymore. I think most just grow out of using it.

I get called retarded twice a day.

Jenson71
03-22-2009, 08:30 PM
Well now March 31 is a day to look forward to.

Valiant
03-22-2009, 08:36 PM
I remember how often "retard" was said to people when I was in high school just a few years ago. "You're retarded ... That's retarded." I never hear it anymore. I think most just grow out of using it.

Nope, retard is still in full swing from what I see and say.. (Best friend is a special ed teacher, he hates me sometimes)

I guess the next step will to be to go after people when they use the term mental in a negative connotation.. "Are you mental??" after they doing something retarded..

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 08:37 PM
IMO, it depends on the context. If it's used directly toward someone with intellectual disabilities of course it's offensive, but I don't see a problem with people on this board calling others retarded in jest. It's not any different than joking around with your buddies and calling them homos.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 08:41 PM
IMO, it depends on the context. If it's used directly toward someone with intellectual disabilities of course it's offensive, but I don't see a problem with people on this board calling others retarded in jest. It's not any different than joking around with your buddies and calling them homos.

Exactly the same. These aren't derogatory terms, IMO it's over-sensitive people that choose to be offended. I don't mind it but definitely avoid using them if I don't know those I'm with well.

luv
03-22-2009, 08:43 PM
IMO, it depends on the context. If it's used directly toward someone with intellectual disabilities of course it's offensive, but I don't see a problem with people on this board calling others retarded in jest. It's not any different than joking around with your buddies and calling them homos.

This. I mean, people tell blonde jokes, and blondes often laugh along with them. There are stereotypes EVERYWHERE. You will never get around them, and you can't just be against the ones that affect you personally.

Deberg_1990
03-22-2009, 08:43 PM
These aren't derogatory terms, IMO it's over-sensitive people that choose to be offended.


This. Anyone who got offended by Obamas comments the other night is retarded.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 08:44 PM
This. Anyone who got offended by Obamas comments the other night is retarded.

ROFL agreed

doomy3
03-22-2009, 08:46 PM
This is so retarded.

wild1
03-22-2009, 08:47 PM
if it's ok for Dear Leader to make fun of them then it's ok for the rest of us

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 08:48 PM
This is so retarded.
Homo.

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 08:50 PM
While we're at it, every commercial that shows a smart guy using Superior Product A and a dumb guy using Inferior Product B makes the Product B user bald. Can we please stop that? Bald guys are some of the smartest people in the world. Pretty much every supervillain in cartoons is bald, and you have to be pretty smart to build a multi-billion dollar villain's lair. And Dwight D. Eisenhower. The man liberated Europe, and he was bald. Meanwhile, Hitler had a full head of hair. What does that tell you?

dj56dt58
03-22-2009, 08:51 PM
This. I mean, people tell blonde jokes, and blondes often laugh along with them. There are stereotypes EVERYWHERE. You will never get around them, and you can't just be against the ones that affect you personally.

thats because they are trying to act like they get the joke...

OnTheWarpath58
03-22-2009, 08:51 PM
http://i43.tinypic.com/2qtz70i.jpg

TinyEvel
03-22-2009, 08:54 PM
But is it okay to say the word "Weetawd" ?

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:06 PM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******

luv
03-22-2009, 09:10 PM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******

So are moron, ignorant, and stupid off limits, too? Seriously. My nephew has autism. Do I call him retarded? Of course not. Do I call someone acting like an idiot retarded? Yes. I'm sorry if you see that as a double standard.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:10 PM
Exactly the same. These aren't derogatory terms, IMO it's over-sensitive people that choose to be offended. I don't mind it but definitely avoid using them if I don't know those I'm with well.

I will plead guilty to being "overly sensitive"...but I am the one having to deal day-in and day-out with my kid being teased in school about being a "retard" by other kids. Even better is sitting in the office and hearing the parent of the other child ask the school what a "retard" is doing in his kids mainstream class.

It's easy to act complacent when you aren't directly affected.

mmaddog
*******

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:14 PM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******

Do we need to replace the word Retardondo in music? Also Homo is accepted ROFL the f word is the one you don't call gays

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:14 PM
So are moron, ignorant, and stupid off limits, too? Seriously. My nephew has autism. Do I call him retarded? Of course not. Do I call someone acting like an idiot retarded? Yes. I'm sorry if you see that as a double standard.

If you don't that is OK....I'm not going to change you.

But if your child was constantly being affected you would feel different. And since you don't live with it every day, you won't understand my feelings on this anymore than I can understand your complacency.

mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:16 PM
Do we need to replace the word Retardondo in music? Also Homo is accepted ROFL the f word is the one you don't call gays

You are reaching with your first example...it is a musical form, not an adjective or noun.

I don't call anyone the f word or homo...

mmaddog
*******

bdeg
03-22-2009, 09:17 PM
I will plead guilty to being "overly sensitive"...but I am the one having to deal day-in and day-out with my kid being teased in school about being a "retard" by other kids. Even better is sitting in the office and hearing the parent of the other child ask the school what a "retard" is doing in his kids mainstream class.

It's easy to act complacent when you aren't directly affected.

mmaddog
*******

That wouldn't be fun. I'm sorry you have to deal with that. Note that in my post I said I try to be careful with my language. I wouldn't use it around kids.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:20 PM
While we're at it, every commercial that shows a smart guy using Superior Product A and a dumb guy using Inferior Product B makes the Product B user bald. Can we please stop that? Bald guys are some of the smartest people in the world. Pretty much every supervillain in cartoons is bald, and you have to be pretty smart to build a multi-billion dollar villain's lair. And Dwight D. Eisenhower. The man liberated Europe, and he was bald. Meanwhile, Hitler had a full head of hair. What does that tell you?


Sorry you find this something to make fun of once again.

mmaddog
*******

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:20 PM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******

Would I be repulsed if my kid said homo? No that is short for Homosexual

luv
03-22-2009, 09:24 PM
You are reaching with your first example...it is a musical form, not an adjective or noun.

I don't call anyone the f word or homo...

mmaddog
*******

It's where the music slows down. Retarded means slow. Are you going to start getting offended if people stop using retarded and start using slow instead?

bdeg
03-22-2009, 09:24 PM
To tell you the truth I don't really mind f*g either. It used to be just another synonym until some people decided they didn't like the way it was used.

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:24 PM
Now I did think the skit Handiman on in living color was over the line

Spott
03-22-2009, 09:25 PM
Would I be repulsed if my kid said homo? No that is short for Homosexual


I would be repulsed. I would expect my my kid to use more creative terms like pillow biter and cock goblin.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:26 PM
Would I be repulsed if my kid said homo? No that is short for Homosexual

Interestingly enough...if my child were to call a person a "homo" in school he would be required to spend time Detention and take part in Sensitivity Classes.

Oddly enough it's ok to call anyone "retard" without repercussions.

mmaddog
*******

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 09:28 PM
Interestingly enough...if my child were to call a person a "homo" in school he would be required to spend time Detention and take part in Sensitivity Classes.

Oddly enough it's ok to call anyone "retard" without repercussions.

mmaddog
*******

Sensitivity classes? WTF?

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 09:28 PM
As a minor digression, there are two competing issues here.


The first is calling someone a name that is (from a clinical perspective) accurately descriptive. For example, calling a cognitively slow person a r***** or calling a gay person a h*** or a black person a n*****.

The second is calling someone the same name when it doesn't apply to them. For example, your coworker goofs up and you call him a r***** or your friend buys a fabulous silk jacket and you call him a h***, or your mother starts listening to hiphop and you call her a n*****. (Okay, I couldn't come up with a good example on that last one.)

The first is something that most people would never do. Kids will do it because kids have a mental age of 7 and compared to adults they're stupid. A few adults will do it because compared to other adults they're stupid. But most people learn over the years that you don't call someone a name that's clinically descriptive. (For this same reason, people seldom mention that I'm bald and have a gap between my front teeth.)

The second is much more common. People do that all the time, and my suspicion is that since it's obviously not a clinically descriptive term, it's recognized that it's teasing or a joke. Therefore, it's not really hurtful to the recipient of the slur. But in actuality it's in most instances a third-party insult, because the namecaller is using the term as an insult, even if it's a feigned one. So if you call your friend a r*****, there's implicitly no insult there for your friend, but it's an insult in absentia at the people for whom the label is clinically descriptive.

I'm not sure where I'm going with this, but I think it's interesting that insulting your friend with one of these terms is in actuality insulting the group from whom the slur originally arose.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:28 PM
It's where the music slows down. Retarded means slow. Are you going to start getting offended if people stop using retarded and start using slow instead?

LOL..nice try but I already hear that too. Anytime you are taking a person's disability and attaching negativity to a word to describe it, the story is still the same.

mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:29 PM
Sensitivity classes? WTF?

Yes..sensitivity classes.

mmaddog
*******

luv
03-22-2009, 09:34 PM
LOL..nice try but I already hear that too. Anytime you are taking a person's disability and attaching negativity to a word to describe it, the story is still the same.

mmaddog
*******

Good luck stopping every stereotype that exists in the world that affects you or your family. To me, that's more of a headache than just dealing with your situation. You love your child, and you want to protect them from everything. No, I'm not a parent, but I do understand that. Short kids get teased, kids with glasses get teased, etc. All you can do is control what happens within your household.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 09:34 PM
The second is calling someone the same name when it doesn't apply to them. For example, your coworker goofs up and you call him a r***** or your friend buys a fabulous silk jacket and you call him a h***, or your mother starts listening to hiphop and you call her a n*****. (Okay, I couldn't come up with a good example on that last one.)


I'm not sure where I'm going with this, but I think it's interesting that insulting your friend with one of these terms is in actuality insulting the group from whom the slur originally arose.

LMAO

True, too. I never looked at it that way, but you're right.

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 09:35 PM
Yes..sensitivity classes.

mmaddog
*******

Forced by the school to attend?

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:35 PM
If I say chiefsplanet is retarded, it means it is running slow btw, not in a negative form that the people here are in their own filth, talking gibberish etc.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:36 PM
Forced by the school to attend?

As I understand it yes.

mmaddog
*******

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 09:38 PM
As I understand it yes.

mmaddog
*******

Wow. Times have changed.

Guess playing "smear the queer" at recess is now out...

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:38 PM
Good luck stopping every stereotype that exists in the world that affects you or your family. To me, that's more of a headache than just dealing with your situation. You love your child, and you want to protect them from everything. No, I'm not a parent, but I do understand that. Short kids get teased, kids with glasses get teased, etc. All you can do is control what happens within your household.

Sorry luv, but IMO I don't think you do understand.

And I don't stop everyone....just the one's that are outrageous and hurtful in a fashion that can't be corrected.

And if I get just one person to stop, then I am ok.

mmaddog
*******

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 09:39 PM
Sorry you find this something to make fun of once again.

mmaddog
*******


I'm not making fun of it. I'm just saying that there's discrimination all over the place.

That said, the special ed kids have it brutal in school. They get it worse than the dorks and the nerds (that was me) and the hillbillies and the chubbies. Everyone knows that. I'm not sure that mainstreaming is particularly helpful with that, either, though I'm not sure.

The good news is that the special ed kids will get through that rough period, and then the adult world will take care of them. Once they get out of high school, they tend to have smooth sailing in "the system" because "the system" knows that they need help. So they take their abuse primarily from ages 6 through 18 and then move on. Some of the other groups take less abuse from 6 through 18, but it then continues the rest of their lives because a lot of adults have no problem talking poorly of a morbidly obese person or a gender-dysmorphic person as an adult.

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 09:39 PM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******
Freely? No. As I said, it depends on the context. Black people call each other the n-word and no one is offended, but it's understandably different when a white guy calls them one in a derogatory manner. Same goes for "homo".

Are you wrong to be offended? Absolutely not. But everyone is can find something to be offended by, but whether or not you let something bother you is your decision.

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:40 PM
Sorry luv, but IMO I don't think you do understand.

And I don't stop everyone....just the one's that are outrageous and hurtful in a fashion that can't be corrected.

And if I get just one person to stop, then I am ok.

mmaddog
*******

yeah luv doesn't understand what it's liked to be teased at all

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:44 PM
yeah luv doesn't understand what it's liked to be teased at all

So what you are doing is comparing luv who is a fully functional person, with my son who has Asperger's Autism?

mmaddog
*******

luv
03-22-2009, 09:47 PM
Sorry luv, but IMO I don't think you do understand.

And I don't stop everyone....just the one's that are outrageous and hurtful in a fashion that can't be corrected.

And if I get just one person to stop, then I am ok.

mmaddog
*******

It actually makes me upset when ou tell me I don't understand. I get tired of people telling me what I do and don't understand when they know little about my actual life. You know how many friends I had in high school whose parents wouldn't let them come over or stay the night with me knowing that my brother, who was an ex con was there? Some of them couldn't hang out with me, period. You think I don't know about stereotypes and how they can hurt people? I'm sorry for your situation. Is that what you're looking for here?

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:49 PM
So what you are doing is comparing luv who is a fully functional person, with my son who has Asperger's Autism?

mmaddog
*******

They both get teased? They both have aspects about them that they can't change? Plus you are really reaching calling a woman fully functional.

luv
03-22-2009, 09:49 PM
So what you are doing is comparing luv who is a fully functional person, with my son who has Asperger's Autism?

mmaddog
*******

I also gained 40 lbs in the summer between elementary school and junior high. On the bus home, I had a kid turn around and ask what happened to me, because I used to be cute and popular. Kids are cruel regardless of whatever your special situation may be.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:50 PM
It actually makes me upset when ou tell me I don't understand. I get tired of people telling me what I do and don't understand when they know little about my actual life. You know how many friends I had in high school whose parents wouldn't let them come over or stay the night with me knowing that my brother, who was an ex con was there? Some of them couldn't hang out with me, period. You think I don't know about stereotypes and how they can hurt people? I'm sorry for your situation. Is that what you're looking for here?

Now you know how my son feels..no one understands the hurt he feels everyday. No just once a week, not just once in a while...every day.

And when I was growing up....my situation was just like yours. My friends weren't allowed to come spend the night at my house either....and others weren't even allowed to be my friends. That...i understand.

mmaddog
*******

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 09:51 PM
So what you are doing is comparing luv who is a fully functional person, with my son who has Asperger's Autism?

mmaddog
*******

He's comparing only level of teasing.

Isn't it possible that someone could be badgered as badly?

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:51 PM
I also gained 40 lbs in the summer between elementary school and junior high. On the bus home, I had a kid turn around and ask what happened to me, because I used to be cute and popular. Kids are cruel regardless of whatever your special situation may be.

better start a thread "fat people takes on use of Fatty fatty 2 by 4"

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:51 PM
They both get teased? They both have aspects about them that they can't change? Plus you are really reaching calling a woman fully functional.

You really don't understand autism do you? How about reading up on it first.

mmaddog
*******

Fat Elvis
03-22-2009, 09:51 PM
As a minor digression, there are two competing issues here.


The first is calling someone a name that is (from a clinical perspective) accurately descriptive. For example, calling a cognitively slow person a r***** or calling a gay person a h*** or a black person a n*****.

The second is calling someone the same name when it doesn't apply to them. For example, your coworker goofs up and you call him a r***** or your friend buys a fabulous silk jacket and you call him a h***, or your mother starts listening to hiphop and you call her a n*****. (Okay, I couldn't come up with a good example on that last one.)

The first is something that most people would never do. Kids will do it because kids have a mental age of 7 and compared to adults they're stupid. A few adults will do it because compared to other adults they're stupid. But most people learn over the years that you don't call someone a name that's clinically descriptive. (For this same reason, people seldom mention that I'm bald and have a gap between my front teeth.)

The second is much more common. People do that all the time, and my suspicion is that since it's obviously not a clinically descriptive term, it's recognized that it's teasing or a joke. Therefore, it's not really hurtful to the recipient of the slur. But in actuality it's in most instances a third-party insult, because the namecaller is using the term as an insult, even if it's a feigned one. So if you call your friend a r*****, there's implicitly no insult there for your friend, but it's an insult in absentia at the people for whom the label is clinically descriptive.

I'm not sure where I'm going with this, but I think it's interesting that insulting your friend with one of these terms is in actuality insulting the group from whom the slur originally arose.

Retarded is no longer the clinically descriptive name. A person with a developmental disability is the clinically descriptive name.

Use of the word "retarded" or "retard" is as disparaging as the use of the N-word or the F-word.

luv
03-22-2009, 09:52 PM
Now you know how my son feels..no one understands the hurt he feels everyday. No just once a week, not just once in a while...every day.

And when I was growing up....my situation was just like yours. My friends weren't allowed to come spend the night at my house either....and others weren't even allowed to be my friends. That...i understand.

mmaddog
*******

Is he keeping up with the mainstream classes. I mean, if it's really damaging him that much, maybe you should put him in a different school where everyone understands.

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 09:52 PM
Plus you are really reaching calling a woman fully functional.

ROFL

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:53 PM
He's comparing only level of teasing.

Isn't it possible that someone could be badgered as badly?

I won't disagree with the level of badgering. I am simply pointing out the difference in ability to handle that badgering.

mmaddog
*******

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 09:54 PM
You really don't understand autism do you? How about reading up on it first.

mmaddog
*******


Ugh *banghead* I had 2 classes on autism on college, I am making POINTS, about the POINT supposedly of your thread. If you want to make this an autism awareness thread go head.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 09:54 PM
Retarded is no longer the clinically descriptive name. A person with a developmental disability is the clinically descriptive name.

Use of the word "retarded" or "retard" is as disparaging as the use of the N-word or the F-word.

And we're all now required, not by social norms but by some decree from above, to say African American instead of black person? Don't make these terms something they aren't(intentionally offensive).

luv
03-22-2009, 09:55 PM
Now you know how my son feels..no one understands the hurt he feels everyday. No just once a week, not just once in a while...every day.

And when I was growing up....my situation was just like yours. My friends weren't allowed to come spend the night at my house either....and others weren't even allowed to be my friends. That...i understand.

mmaddog
*******

My nephew understands. No, I'm not with him everyday. That doesn't mean I don't care. I'm sorry you have such a difficult time.

luv
03-22-2009, 09:56 PM
I won't disagree with the level of badgering. I am simply pointing out the difference in ability to handle that badgering.

mmaddog
*******

So you can understand why I have such a hard time when it comes to my self worth.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 09:57 PM
Is he keeping up with the mainstream classes. I mean, if it's really damaging him that much, maybe you should put him in a different school where everyone understands.

Actually he is doing well in the mainstream classes...he is making B's and B-'s without any Assisted Resources this year.

And why should I have to pay to move him to a different school. We will find this at every school....there is a very good program in Columbia which is adminstered in conjunction with MU. But that doesn't stop the same set of 'teasing" there either.

mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:00 PM
So you can understand why I have such a hard time when it comes to my self worth.

Yes I can, and I am sorry for that. When we learn to accept each other as we are maybe we can actually focus on something important.

mmaddog
*******

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 10:00 PM
I won't disagree with the level of badgering. I am simply pointing out the difference in ability to handle that badgering.

mmaddog
*******

True enough.

FAX
03-22-2009, 10:00 PM
I remember how often "retard" was said to people when I was in high school just a few years ago. "You're retarded ... That's retarded." I never hear it anymore. I think most just grow out of using it.

I think that's probably very true, Mr. Jenson71. Like a lot of things, what you find humorous changes as you change. As for the "R-word", it's distasteful as any other slur out there. Acceptable to some, but degrading and thoughtless, nonetheless.

I'm not above using any number of tasteless words in the interest of humor. My personal preference at the moment is "Midget Bitch". That's probably demeaning to at least 72 percent of the world's total population of midget bitches even on a good day. However, the "R-word" is one I make every attempt to avoid because I know that it can be extremely hurtful. But, unless or until you befriend someone who is actually mentally challenged, you'll probably never be sensitive to the issue. To be honest, I was never particularly conscious of the extremely negative impact of the word until I joined ChiefsPlanet. The bottom line is that it will never completely go away, but it's clear that if you're relying on the "R-word" to be funny, you're not very.

FAX

luv
03-22-2009, 10:01 PM
Actually he is doing well in the mainstream classes...he is making B's and B-'s without any Assisted Resources this year.

And why should I have to pay to move him to a different school. We will find this at every school....there is a very good program in Columbia which is adminstered in conjunction with MU. But that doesn't stop the same set of 'teasing" there either.

mmaddog
*******

You're asking everone to alter themselves for the sake of you and your family.

I totally get your argument here, and why you think I'm flippant or don't understand. In your situation, I'm sure you feel like there's no one who understands. Are there any support groups in your area where you can go that would help you deal with the things you go through?

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 10:01 PM
I don't like this game where you say "this person is fully functional" this person is not" that only encourages me to bring out my High anxiety/Depression/bipolar card. Which at that point I will be forced to buy a wellness dog.

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 10:03 PM
True enough.

The fact that I thought about how the son handles the badgering was lesson enough for me in this thread. That is one thing I am going to have to take with me.

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 10:04 PM
Actually he is doing well in the mainstream classes...he is making B's and B-'s without any Assisted Resources this year.

And why should I have to pay to move him to a different school. We will find this at every school....there is a very good program in Columbia which is adminstered in conjunction with MU. But that doesn't stop the same set of 'teasing" there either.

mmaddog
*******
I am very sorry you and your son have to deal with this mmaddog, but do you honestly think your situation would change one iota even if everyone stopped using that word on this board?

DeezNutz
03-22-2009, 10:05 PM
The fact that I thought about how the son handles the badgering was lesson enough for me in this thread. That is one thing I am going to have to take with me.

I usually handle a badger by shooting it. They're mean little fuckers.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:06 PM
You're asking everone to alter themselves for the sake of you and your family.

No, I am asking you to change for every family that has a Special Needs child, not just my family.

I totally get your argument here, and why you think I'm flippant or don't understand. In your situation, I'm sure you feel like there's no one who understands. Are there any support groups in your area where you can go that would help you deal with the things you go through?

We are very active participants in support groups, and that is why I can say without reservation that i want you to change for more than just my family.

mmaddog
*******

luv
03-22-2009, 10:07 PM
No, I am asking you to change for every family that has a Special Needs child, not just my family.



We are very active participants in support groups, and that is why I can say without reservation that i want you to change for more than just my family.

mmaddog
*******

It's in my family as well. But I don't understand, obviously.

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 10:07 PM
How old is your son, mmaddog?

I'm curious because I think the intensity of teasing anyone (whatever the reason) is probably low in the early grades, grows through elementary school, spikes up in junior high, and then eventually starts going down again in high school. Where is he in that cycle?

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 10:07 PM
I usually handle a badger by shooting it. They're mean little ****ers.

I hate badgers. What I am most confused about though, is if you are using retard as a form of slow, now the N has no other use other than hate, and the F word, well hey I might carry a bunch of sticks from time to time. I am confused how someone else is going to tell me what I mean when I say it.

Fat Elvis
03-22-2009, 10:09 PM
I'm not making fun of it. I'm just saying that there's discrimination all over the place.

That said, the special ed kids have it brutal in school. They get it worse than the dorks and the nerds (that was me) and the hillbillies and the chubbies. Everyone knows that. I'm not sure that mainstreaming is particularly helpful with that, either, though I'm not sure.

The good news is that the special ed kids will get through that rough period, and then the adult world will take care of them. Once they get out of high school, they tend to have smooth sailing in "the system" because "the system" knows that they need help. So they take their abuse primarily from ages 6 through 18 and then move on. Some of the other groups take less abuse from 6 through 18, but it then continues the rest of their lives because a lot of adults have no problem talking poorly of a morbidly obese person or a gender-dysmorphic person as an adult.

You obviously don't know much about "the system" do you? Waiting up to four years to get into a "system" that pretty much guarentees living in perpetual poverty? Woo. Most of these people can't wait.

It might surprise you to know that most people with developmental disabilities don't want "the system;" they want opportunities. It might surprise you to know that, at least in Kansas, some people with developmental disabilities go on to get college degrees--or even graduate level degrees. It might surprise you to know that on a percentage basis, people with developmental disabilities tend to have a higher level of voter registration than the general population. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities have written legislation that has been adopted. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities are entreprenuers and have their own profitable businesses; here are a couple of examples in Kansas: http://www.anthonysbeehive.com/index.htm and http://www.poppinjoes.com/.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:11 PM
I am very sorry you and your son have to deal with this mmaddog, but do you honestly think your situation would change one iota even if everyone stopped using that word on this board?

Bugeater:

Do I think everyone will change..absolutely not. But isn't it selfish of me just to campaign for my situation/interests only...if just one person, no matter where they live takes one moment to ponder what I find as a passion, then that is reward enough.

My son is 16 and I have had to face this struggle since he was diagnosed. I only hope that my passion will make it a little easier for another parent who already faces an uphill battle when faced with the diagnosis of having a Special Needs child.

mmaddog
*******

FAX
03-22-2009, 10:11 PM
I think the main point is this; mentally disabled persons cannot defend themselves. They simply can't. Others must do it for them, if it happens at all.

Fat people can defend themselves. Some of the smartest peeps in the world are fat. Ugly people can defend themselves. All they have to do is make a mean face. In fact, some of the best fighters are some ugly, dang dudes. Lesbians, Chinamen, Dwarfs, Blacks, Geeks, and Buzzard Lovers can all defend themselves. But not mentally deficient peeps. What we have to remember is that one little gene in the wrong place and we would be graduating high school at the age of 27. In the meantime, it's not too much to ask to show a little kindness to those who are afflicted with this problem. It pains me to hear people say that's too much trouble.

FAX

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:12 PM
How old is your son, mmaddog?

I'm curious because I think the intensity of teasing anyone (whatever the reason) is probably low in the early grades, grows through elementary school, spikes up in junior high, and then eventually starts going down again in high school. Where is he in that cycle?

He is a Sophomore in HS...

mmaddog
*******

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:12 PM
You obviously don't know much about "the system" do you? Waiting up to four years to get into a "system" that pretty much guarentees living in perpetual poverty? Woo. Most of these people can't wait.

It might surprise you to know that most people with developmental disabilities don't want "the system;" they want opportunities. It might surprise you to know that, at least in Kansas, some people with developmental disabilities go on to get college degrees--or even graduate level degrees. It might surprise you to know that on a percentage basis, people with developmental disabilities tend to have a higher level of voter registration than the general population. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities have written legislation that has been adopted. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities are entreprenuers and have their own profitable businesses; here are a couple of examples in Kansas: http://www.anthonysbeehive.com/index.htm and http://www.poppinjoes.com/.
And for those that aren't up to the task, "the system" gives them a much better chance to function independently than they would have if left to their own devices.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:18 PM
It's in my family as well. But I don't understand, obviously.

luv:

I think you have an idea of his pain....but here is where i feel you don't understand living with it every day.

Autism is a 24 hr a day affliction...it doesn't come and go. Unless you live 24 hours a day with your nephew, you can't come to a complete understanding of how difficult in every aspect.

If i am wrong..so be it.

mmaddog
*******

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 10:20 PM
You obviously don't know much about "the system" do you? Waiting up to four years to get into a "system" that pretty much guarentees living in perpetual poverty? Woo. Most of these people can't wait.

It might surprise you to know that most people with developmental disabilities don't want "the system;" they want opportunities. It might surprise you to know that, at least in Kansas, some people with developmental disabilities go on to get college degrees--or even graduate level degrees. It might surprise you to know that on a percentage basis, people with developmental disabilities tend to have a higher level of voter registration than the general population. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities have written legislation that has been adopted. It might surprise you to know that people with developmental disabilities are entreprenuers and have their own profitable businesses; here are a couple of examples in Kansas: http://www.anthonysbeehive.com/index.htm and http://www.poppinjoes.com/.


I think you're proving my point for the most part. I applaud these folks for working hard, but you'll see in those cases where the terms used are "the business was established for [insert name here]". And if someone is writing legislation or receiving a graduate degree or college degree without help, I'd have a hard time labeling them as developmentally disabled. Something is inherently wrong with one system or the other when a person can be simultaneously labeled as "developmentally disabled" and "college graduate".

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:22 PM
luv:

I think you have an idea of his pain....but here is where i feel you don't understand living with it every day.

Autism is a 24 hr a day affliction...it doesn't come and go. Unless you live 24 hours a day with your nephew, you can't come to a complete understanding of how difficult in every aspect.

If i am wrong..so be it.

mmaddog
*******

Being ridiculed for something you can't hope to change wouldn't be fun. I feel very sorry for your son. That's great that he's doing well in classes despite, though. You must be doing something right.

DaFace
03-22-2009, 10:23 PM
Using the word r***** is gay.

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 10:25 PM
Bugeater:

Do I think everyone will change..absolutely not. But isn't it selfish of me just to campaign for my situation/interests only...if just one person, no matter where they live takes one moment to ponder what I find as a passion, then that is reward enough.

My son is 16 and I have had to face this struggle since he was diagnosed. I only hope that my passion will make it a little easier for another parent who already faces an uphill battle when faced with the diagnosis of having a Special Needs child.

mmaddog
*******
Fair enough. FWIW I did a search of my posts and only found one where I used the word on this board, and hopefully I'll think twice before I use it again. Usually I just let things fly here without thinking about them...

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 10:27 PM
He is a Sophomore in HS...

mmaddog
*******


Not to be nosy, but you mentioned that he's roughly a B student in mainstream classes without any help. That doesn't sound to me like he's developmentally disabled, at least not according to my definition. I'm not familiar with the type of autism you mentioned, so...am I missing something?

If he's a sophomore, I wonder if he's getting the worst behind him. I hope so. That's the way it was in my high school, anyway. At 17 and 18, the kids started getting more mature and the bullying really declined for all of the targeted groups. However, in my school the special ed kids were all in class together and weren't mainstreamed other than gym class, so that may have had an impact.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:28 PM
Autism isn't always severe, this is what "idiot savants" often have. I don't know much about his type, though.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:30 PM
Fair enough. FWIW I did a search of my posts and only found one where I used the word on this board, and hopefully I'll think twice before I use it again. Usually I just let things fly here without thinking about them...

Ditto, I was actually kind of surprised to see the only results that popped up for me were of me quoting others.

Demonpenz
03-22-2009, 10:31 PM
Ditto, I was actually kind of surprised to see the only results that popped up for me were of me quoting others.

Did you spell it wrong? They ususally spell it "retart"

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:33 PM
Did you spell it wrong? They ususally spell it "retart"

Oh, I've been called a tard plenty of times on here, always by Dane.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:36 PM
Not to be nosy, but you mentioned that he's roughly a B student in mainstream classes without any help. That doesn't sound to me like he's developmentally disabled, at least not according to my definition. I'm not familiar with the type of autism you mentioned, so...am I missing something?

If he's a sophomore, I wonder if he's getting the worst behind him. I hope so. That's the way it was in my high school, anyway. At 17 and 18, the kids started getting more mature and the bullying really declined for all of the targeted groups. However, in my school the special ed kids were all in class together and weren't mainstreamed other than gym class, so that may have had an impact.

My son Jacob has Asperger's Syndrome, which is 'high functioning" autism, meaning he can communicate normally, but still has functional disabilities. He can probably teach History classes better than most HS Teachers (he and i share a love of history) based on his ability to absorb information, but being able to disseminate certain things is difficult for him. Additionally he has emotional struggles that are ascerbated by his Asperger's.

mmaddog
*******

Baconeater
03-22-2009, 10:37 PM
Did you spell it wrong? They ususally spell it "retart"
Shit. Mark me down for a few more. :banghead:

Fat Elvis
03-22-2009, 10:38 PM
I think you're proving my point for the most part. I applaud these folks for working hard, but you'll see in those cases where the terms used are "the business was established for [insert name here]". And if someone is writing legislation or receiving a graduate degree or college degree without help, I'd have a hard time labeling them as developmentally disabled. Something is inherently wrong with one system or the other when a person can be simultaneously labeled as "developmentally disabled" and "college graduate".

It doesn't change the fact that they have a developmental disability whether you like the definition or not (IQ has never been a measure of a person's will or persistance--there are plenty of folks with genius level IQs that are abject failures); what has changed--and is continually changing-- are the opportunities that are offered to people with developmental disabilities. The same people who now have the opportunity to get college degrees were pretty much guarenteed a life of institutionalization even within the past 40 years.

Eliminating use of the "R-Word" is part of the process of change.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:39 PM
Fair enough. FWIW I did a search of my posts and only found one where I used the word on this board, and hopefully I'll think twice before I use it again. Usually I just let things fly here without thinking about them...

Bugeater:

I know i come across pretty strong on this...and will plead guilty to being sensitive.

There are only a few people who truly use this word incessantly and without regard for others. The offenders are a short list....

mmaddog
*******

cdcox
03-22-2009, 10:39 PM
I know a kid with a developmental disability that is perfectly capable of college level work. But he comes from a great home and has had great support from his K-12 schools and church. It would be easy to pick on this kid. In a less supportive environment, I doubt he'd have achieved any where close to what he has. He will be a productive contributor to the US economy.

Had he been in a more typical environment, it would have been very easy for him to have fallen far short of his potential. Who would have lost? Him, his family, his future employers, and the tax payers (losing a good worker contributing to the base). Who would have won? No one.

Wouldn't we all benefit from more self-sufficient workers? This isn't a very hard issue to get behind.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 10:43 PM
It doesn't change the fact that they have a developmental disability whether you like the definition or not (IQ has never been a measure of a person's will or persistance--there are plenty of folks with genius level IQs that are abject failures); what has changed--and is continually changing-- are the opportunities that are offered to people with developmental disabilities. The same people who now have the opportunity to get college degrees were pretty much guarenteed a life of institutionalization even within the past 40 years.

Eliminating use of the "R-Word" is part of the process of change.
You obviously don't know much about "the system" do you? Waiting up to four years to get into a "system" that pretty much guarentees living in perpetual poverty? Woo. Most of these people can't wait.


You're ignoring the fact that those opportunities now afforded are a result of "the system," not a result of the intelligent mentally-handicapped.

After the "R-Word," I guarantee you it will just be something else.

Would kids calling your child/friend/whatever a "gomer" sound any less mean?

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:46 PM
I know a kid with a developmental disability that is perfectly capable of college level work. But he comes from a great home and has had great support from his K-12 schools and church. It would be easy to pick on this kid. In a less supportive environment, I doubt he'd have achieved any where close to what he has. He will be a productive contributor to the US economy.

Had he been in a more typical environment, it would have been very easy for him to have fallen far short of his potential. Who would have lost? Him, his family, his future employers, and the tax payers (losing a good worker contributing to the base). Who would have won? No one.

Wouldn't we all benefit from more self-sufficient workers? This isn't a very hard issue to get behind.

We work hard every day to get my son all that he needs to be able to survive once my wife and I are gone. I am lucky in that I am blessed with the financial capability to provide resources that others cannot, and still we struggle mightily to help him cope. I can't imagine what it is like for a single parent struggling with a situation similar to ours.

mmaddog
*******

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 10:48 PM
I know a kid with a developmental disability that is perfectly capable of college level work. But he comes from a great home and has had great support from his K-12 schools and church. It would be easy to pick on this kid. In a less supportive environment, I doubt he'd have achieved any where close to what he has. He will be a productive contributor to the US economy.

Had he been in a more typical environment, it would have been very easy for him to have fallen far short of his potential. Who would have lost? Him, his family, his future employers, and the tax payers (losing a good worker contributing to the base). Who would have won? No one.

Wouldn't we all benefit from more self-sufficient workers? This isn't a very hard issue to get behind.

Maybe I'm working off the wrong definition, then. I tend to define developmentally disabled as having a physical issue within the brain that prevents one from having the mental horsepower to function at a high level intellectually. It's something that can't be fixed or overcome and the horsepower simply doesn't exist.

I differentiate that from someone with a learning disability where they have enough horsepower, but there's some other issue (e.g., dyslexia) that blocks the ability to access that horsepower.

Mmaddog's son may represent the gray area in between the two bright lines I'm drawing, of course. It sounds like he's got the horsepower, but has a condition that blocks access (hence a learning disability), but if Asperger's also causes emotional problems beyond his control then maybe it's also a developmental disability.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 10:52 PM
You're ignoring the fact that those opportunities now afforded are a result of "the system," not a result of the intelligent mentally-handicapped.

After the "R-Word," I guarantee you it will just be something else.

We struggled with "the system" just trying to get my son diagnosed...we fought with a backwards state system that required that a Specialist and a family doctor agree on the assessment. 10 years ago you couldn't find a Family Practitioner who would touch agreeing with the diagnosis of Autism-Spectrum Disorders.

We weren't able to get him diagnosed with Asperger's until we moved back to Missouri. We took him to a Specialist associated with the University (MU has one of the most forward-moving ASD research groups in the States). Had we been able to get his diagnosis earlier in life we could have gotten him in programs that would have helped in his development.

The "system" failed my family and I....I campaign to make sure no one faces the obstacles my family and I have.

mmaddog
*******

Fat Elvis
03-22-2009, 10:53 PM
Maybe I'm working off the wrong definition, then. I tend to define developmentally disabled as having a physical issue within the brain that prevents one from having the mental horsepower to function at a high level intellectually. It's something that can't be fixed or overcome and the horsepower simply doesn't exist.

I differentiate that from someone with a learning disability where they have enough horsepower, but there's some other issue (e.g., dyslexia) that blocks the ability to access that horsepower.

Mmaddog's son may represent the gray area in between the two bright lines I'm drawing, of course. It sounds like he's got the horsepower, but has a condition that blocks access (hence a learning disability), but if Asperger's also causes emotional problems beyond his control then maybe it's also a developmental disability.

In order to be diagnosed with a developmental disability, the person must posess an IQ of 70 or below (or two standard deviations below the mean on a standardized scale) and have the onset of the disability before the age of 22.

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 10:57 PM
In order to be diagnosed with a developmental disability, the person must posess an IQ of 70 or below (or two standard deviations below the mean on a standardized scale) and have the onset of the disability before the age of 22.

I'm not trying to be flip here, but a person can meet that definition and still get a college degree?

Oh...wait. University of Miami.

cdcox
03-22-2009, 10:57 PM
You're ignoring the fact that those opportunities now afforded are a result of "the system," not a result of the intelligent mentally-handicapped.

After the "R-Word," I guarantee you it will just be something else.

In this case, "the system" is a good thing. You are taking someone who was previously not productive and are making them productive. A good contributor to a business owner's bottom line.

Not sure what you mean by "not a result of the intelligent mentally-handicapped." If you mean they would not have been able to achieve these societal gains purely on their own, you may be right. But most everyone who succeeds in this society does so through the help and support of others. My debt to my parents, teachers, mentors, friends, and colleagues is huge.

Any way you slice it, someone who contributes to society is a good thing. And many people who suffer from these conditions do contribute in ways that are far more significant than do many who are "fully functional".

bdeg
03-22-2009, 11:00 PM
We struggled with "the system" just trying to get my son diagnosed...we fought with a backwards state system that required that a Specialist and a family doctor agree on the assessment. 10 years ago you couldn't find a Family Practitioner who would touch agreeing with the diagnosis of Autism-Spectrum Disorders.

We weren't able to get him diagnosed with Asperger's until we moved back to Missouri. We took him to a Specialist associated with the University (MU has one of the most forward-moving ASD research groups in the States). Had we been able to get his diagnosis earlier in life we could have gotten him in programs that would have helped in his development.

The "system" failed my family and I....I campaign to make sure no one faces the obstacles my family and I have.

mmaddog
*******

That's very unfortunate, but I'd imagine it's still better than being on your own with it. I'm assuming with the diagnosis you're covered for most of your extra expenses. The government has to safeguard itself against exploitation by putting up red tape some times. If they didn't everyone would be signing up for the benefits afforded those with disabilities. I have a friend that had ADD all through HS, now he gets an extra hour to take a test in a room by himself along with other leniencies. It's too bad it got in the way this time, but it's not like the help wasn't available at market price without gov intervention. I realize it would've been unreasonable, which is the reason for the system.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 11:01 PM
To all...

I started this thread for the very reason we see here.....good discourse. I do not expect everyone to agree and I would be a pollyanna to think I can change all the world.

But if you are more aware, and more receptive to what others deal with I will be happy with that.

I sincerely thank you for all your replies whether you agree with the premise or not.

mmaddog
*******

Rain Man
03-22-2009, 11:03 PM
Thanks, mmaddog. I like participating in these discussions even if I'm a bit ignorant sometimes.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 11:03 PM
That's very unfortunate, but I'd imagine it's still better than being on your own with it. I'm assuming with the diagnosis you're covered for most of your extra expenses. The government has to safeguard itself against exploitation by putting up red tape some times. If they didn't everyone would be signing up for the benefits afforded those with disabilities. I have a friend that had ADD all through HS, now he gets an extra hour to take a test in a room by himself along with other leniencies. It's too bad it got in the way this time, but it's not like the help wasn't available at market price without gov intervention. I realize it would've been unreasonable, which is the reason for the system.

The expenses aren't nearly covered as they should be...but i am blessed with financial resources...I cannot imagine the struggles that some of the people in our support group face ever day who are single parents.

mmaddog
*******

bdeg
03-22-2009, 11:03 PM
In this case, "the system" is a good thing. You are taking someone who was previously not productive and are making them productive. A good contributor to a business owner's bottom line.

Not sure what you mean by "not a result of the intelligent mentally-handicapped." If you mean they would not have been able to achieve these societal gains purely on their own, you may be right. But most everyone who succeeds in this society does so through the help and support of others. My debt to my parents, teachers, mentors, friends, and colleagues is huge.

Any way you slice it, someone who contributes to society is a good thing. And many people who suffer from these conditions do contribute in ways that are far more significant than do many who are "fully functional".

That wasn't exactly how I meant it. It was more a response to the assertion that these changes in the opportunities came about due to the prior accomplishments of "mentally handicapped" people.

Mosbonian
03-22-2009, 11:06 PM
Thanks, mmaddog. I like participating in these discussions even if I'm a bit ignorant sometimes.

I don't see you as ignorant....just not aware because it doesn't affect you daily like it does me. I learn more everyday...

I appreciate anyone's interest.

mmaddog
*******

cdcox
03-22-2009, 11:11 PM
Maybe I'm working off the wrong definition, then. I tend to define developmentally disabled as having a physical issue within the brain that prevents one from having the mental horsepower to function at a high level intellectually. It's something that can't be fixed or overcome and the horsepower simply doesn't exist.

I differentiate that from someone with a learning disability where they have enough horsepower, but there's some other issue (e.g., dyslexia) that blocks the ability to access that horsepower.

Mmaddog's son may represent the gray area in between the two bright lines I'm drawing, of course. It sounds like he's got the horsepower, but has a condition that blocks access (hence a learning disability), but if Asperger's also causes emotional problems beyond his control then maybe it's also a developmental disability.

I'm not sure of the official diagnosis of the kid I'm talking about. Probably some kind of autism. You would know from the first second you talked to him that he had some kind of condition. His speech is slow, girls his age are friends with him but don't consider him boyfriend material. You would never be able to send him on his own to woo a client. He doesn't have the social or emotional horsepower (to use your word) to make the connections with people that are needed in many situations in modern society. But academically he is probably in the top 25% of kids his age.

Fat Elvis
03-22-2009, 11:11 PM
That's very unfortunate, but I'd imagine it's still better than being on your own with it. I'm assuming with the diagnosis you're covered for most of your extra expenses. The government has to safeguard itself against exploitation by putting up red tape some times. If they didn't everyone would be signing up for the benefits afforded those with disabilities. I have a friend that had ADD all through HS, now he gets an extra hour to take a test in a room by himself along with other leniencies. It's too bad it got in the way this time, but it's not like the help wasn't available at market price without gov intervention. I realize it would've been unreasonable, which is the reason for the system.

You would assume wrong. In Kansas, at least, waiver services for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders started only last year and currently only serves 50 children (twice as many as last year).

The issue isn't about red tape. The issue is about funding. The thing is, if programs are funded properly in the first place, it actually saves the taxpayer a LOT of money in the long run.

bdeg
03-22-2009, 11:13 PM
You would assume wrong. In Kansas, at least, waiver services for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders started only last year and currently only serves 50 children (twice as many as last year).

The issue isn't about red tape. The issue is about funding. The thing is, if programs are funded properly in the first place, it actually saves the taxpayer a LOT of money in the long run.

Now that really is a shame.

Valiant
03-23-2009, 01:24 AM
I think the main point is this; mentally disabled persons cannot defend themselves. They simply can't. Others must do it for them, if it happens at all.

Fat people can defend themselves. Some of the smartest peeps in the world are fat. Ugly people can defend themselves. All they have to do is make a mean face. In fact, some of the best fighters are some ugly, dang dudes. Lesbians, Chinamen, Dwarfs, Blacks, Geeks, and Buzzard Lovers can all defend themselves. But not mentally deficient peeps. What we have to remember is that one little gene in the wrong place and we would be graduating high school at the age of 27. In the meantime, it's not too much to ask to show a little kindness to those who are afflicted with this problem. It pains me to hear people say that's too much trouble.

FAX

They can't defend themselves but they are successful entrepreneurs and can write legislation???

Is it too much to ask to show a little kindness to those who are afflicted with being raised as Raiders fans?? I mean it is not their fault they were conditioned to like a shitty team.. It pains me to hear people say that's too much trouble..

Valiant
03-23-2009, 01:31 AM
Not to be nosy, but you mentioned that he's roughly a B student in mainstream classes without any help. That doesn't sound to me like he's developmentally disabled, at least not according to my definition. I'm not familiar with the type of autism you mentioned, so...am I missing something?

If he's a sophomore, I wonder if he's getting the worst behind him. I hope so. That's the way it was in my high school, anyway. At 17 and 18, the kids started getting more mature and the bullying really declined for all of the targeted groups. However, in my school the special ed kids were all in class together and weren't mainstreamed other than gym class, so that may have had an impact.

Well hopefully they are not passing him to get him gone.. I know quite a few teachers at Park University who gave passing grades to students who did not earn them because they felt sorry for them or were told to pass them by the dean($$$)... I had a couple of classes with people with learning disabilities that could not even write a research paper but somehow got passing grades??

Our HS and Jr High separated them (93-97) in all different classes outside of lunch.. There was never real bullying at Fort Osage when I went and they were never called retards.. The only retards that got labeled were fully functioning people acting like dumbshits.. Still true to this day..

donkhater
03-23-2009, 06:08 AM
I've posted on these threads before. With regards to the use of the words 'retardation' or 'retarded', people just don't seem to know when they've crossed the line.

My son has a very rare disorder called Cri du Chat or 5p- syndrome. He is missing part of his fifth chromosome. It is not passed on genetically. It was just a simple mistake in DNA replication when he was conceived. Lightning strikes sometimes.

He is 10 years old now. He still isn't potty trained. Walks and runs around fine, but is awfully clumsy. There is rarely a time he doesn't have 2-3 bruises somewhere on his body. He doesn't speak words and can have emotional outbursts for seemingly no reason at all at anytime.

Having said that, he is affectionate, curious and has probably more intelligence than we give him credit for. He can communicate using signs, but sign language is tough for him (this particular disorder affects his muscle tone and coordination in particular). My wife and I actully thinks he can read a little and can count up to about 20 or so. He follows instructions well so the connection with others is there.

When 'normal' people call others 'retarded', they are refering to people like my son. They don't mean 'stupid', they don't mean 'thick' and they don't mean 'naive'. Normal people all act stupid, thick and naive at some point in their lives. Using the word 'retarded' is an extra dose of insult and everyone knows what it implies. It implies that they are so stupid they aren't worth knowing. But isn't that how most people feel about the mentally handicapped?

If people were to use the term 'retarded' or 'retardation' in the correct context, I have no problem. My son IS mentally retarded. He does have mental retardation. But using those words as slander insults people who had no control over the cards they were dealt and is incredibly disrespectful. I won't even get into the word 'retard'. There is never a time in which that word is called for.

Saulbadguy
03-23-2009, 06:16 AM
I generally shorten it and just say "tard".

The Bad Guy
03-23-2009, 06:33 AM
I also gained 40 lbs in the summer between elementary school and junior high. On the bus home, I had a kid turn around and ask what happened to me, because I used to be cute and popular. Kids are cruel regardless of whatever your special situation may be.

Exactly.

Kids are awfully cruel. They have been cruel forever. This isn't going to change.

If you are using the term offensively to define a special needs child, then it's terrible.

If you are using it as slang to define someone who is fully functional, I don't see the problem.

Phobia
03-23-2009, 06:38 AM
I have no problem discouraging the use of the word to poke fun at special needs children if it's actually harmful. I do have a problem where we have to pretend that those people are just like everybody else. First we dropped the "handicapped" moniker because it was somehow offensive. Now we're dropping "retarded". I've looked into my magic 8 ball and I see that somebody asking us to stop saying "special needs" is imminent.

It's a word. If it's used mean then it sounds mean. If it's used appropriately then it's perfectly acceptable. We need to stop banishing words and start banishing oversensitive people.

donkhater
03-23-2009, 06:39 AM
Exactly.

Kids are awfully cruel. They have been cruel forever. This isn't going to change.

If you are using the term offensively to define a special needs child, then it's terrible.

If you are using it as slang to define someone who is fully functional, I don't see the problem.

Most kids, especially young ones, aren't cruel intentionally. They are honest and say what is directly on their mind because they aren't experienced enough to know that their words can hurt people.

Katipan
03-23-2009, 06:39 AM
I won't say it anymore because like-that-one-dude-whats-his-name said they can't defend themselves. And because apparently it really hurts everyone around the child. Good enough for me.

I prefer cunt or asshole. Universally interchangeable, racially indiscriminate, means whatever the hell you want it to mean, with the added joy of a gender insult depending on which way you use them.

donkhater
03-23-2009, 06:45 AM
I have no problem discouraging the use of the word to poke fun at special needs children if it's actually harmful. I do have a problem where we have to pretend that those people are just like everybody else. First we dropped the "handicapped" moniker because it was somehow offensive. Now we're dropping "retarded". I've looked into my magic 8 ball and I see that somebody asking us to stop saying "special needs" is imminent.

It's a word. If it's used mean then it sounds mean. If it's used appropriately then it's perfectly acceptable. We need to stop banishing words and start banishing oversensitive people.

I agree. For my own part, I don't get bent out of shape when people use those words in jest. Personally I wouldn't use them but I try to take opportunities, like this thread, to persuade people not to as well.

But I know not everyone has the same experiences I do and in all likelyhood, they are using terminology as they've heard it their whole lives. It is part of the popular language and most people are obliviuos to what it really means to a segment of society.

Now, that type of speech directed at my son? Then we've got issues.

jwazzie
03-23-2009, 07:19 AM
Having a child with Downs I hate the r word. I regret saying ever saying it and I hope people just think what they are saying before saying anything.

donkhater
03-23-2009, 07:46 AM
Having a child with Downs I hate the r word. I regret saying ever saying it and I hope people just think what they are saying before saying anything.

While I don't think I ever used the r word liberally before I had my son, I know I used it.

So I try to remember that I was unaware of the sensitivity of that word. If I was unaware prior to having my son, how can I expect anyone else to be aware? I just try to use moments like these to let people know that it does matter.

Iowanian
03-23-2009, 08:11 AM
I'm certain that in HS I used it alot, complete with the stereotypical stupid impressions.

In college as a freshman, I ended up, through a class, volunteering with an adult handicapped recreation group. Basically, playing kickball, soccer, flag football, arts and crafts with people over 18 with mental and physical problems. I admit that at first, I was very uncomfortable in that situation. Its difficult to see people with some of the conditions they have and some of the issues their afflictions cause like drooling and snot....but my biggest problem was my own.....and the uncomfortable feeling I got from "touching". You see, these people...and I quickly was aware that they are indeed PEOPLE, are very affectionate and hug alot. I've never been a hugger and it was awkward for me.

I didn't take long before I looked forward to those days of the week and I can't think that I EVER left that time in less than a better mood than when I went. It was refreshing and enjoyable to work with those people. It changed the way I used the word.

2 other things have made me very aware of my use of the word.
1. Knowing people on this site have children/grandchildren with these problems makes you realise how common it is and how much it can hurt those family members. I've likely slipped, but sure make an effort not to do so.

2. A couple of years ago, I was talking to someone I've known since I was very young, and that person has a 20something with Downs. I know him as well and he's as kind of a human being as I've ever met. Anyway, in conversation, I was angry with 3-4 guys and was talking to the dad about it, and in my anger said something like "XXXXXX and those 3 retards that he runs with.....".....and before I completed the word, knew what I'd said, and saw the look in the guys face. I've probably never felt like a bigger asshole in my life.


I'm sure it doesn't mean anything to some of you or offend others....but in this case, I think I understand why the word sucks so much. I'll keep trying and hope others do too.

seclark
03-23-2009, 08:29 AM
my beautiful grandaughter was born w/Downs.

i hate the word, but Lord knows i've said things that also offend. therefore, i try to stay off my high horse and refrain from attempting to change things i have no control over. i have better results, trying to change myself.

it's a constant task, learning to live together in a world filled w/different types of people.
sec

MTG#10
03-23-2009, 09:39 AM
When someone tells me they dont like a certain word it makes me want to use it even more. Its a word you over-sensitive vag. As long as Im not calling some kid with DS a retard there's no need to get bent out of shape over it.

Katipan
03-23-2009, 09:41 AM
When someone tells me they dont like a certain word it makes me want to use it even more.

Of all the reasons to do something, that has to be the dumbest one I've ever heard of.

MTG#10
03-23-2009, 09:44 AM
Of all the reasons to do something, that has to be the dumbest one I've ever heard of.

Im sick of political correctness and whiny over-sensitive pussies complaining about anything and everything that offends them. Grow some thicker skin and mind your own business. Like I said, its one thing to call a kid with DS a retard, or to call a homo-sexual a pillowbiter, but if I want to call my buddies that in jest I will. I was talking to a guy at my work the other day and used the word "fucking" as some bitch was walking by and she felt the need to stop, turn to me and tell me how she hates that word. I told her to give me a fucking break.

DeezNutz
03-23-2009, 09:46 AM
therefore, i try to stay off my high horse and refrain from attempting to change things i have no control over. i have better results, trying to change myself.


Well said. Lots of truth here.

Iowanian
03-23-2009, 09:49 AM
And you don't think the parent/grandparent with the Downs child in the next booth over should feel the sting because you think its alright?

I'm definitely not a PC person, and I probably would have a similar arguement with some of the other words that draw ire, but I think some words just carry a sharp edge, and this one, is pretty damn sure one of them for people too close to the situation. I've seen the look in the eye of a parent at close range, and its definitely not a faux-hurt/outrage like so many other words hip to hate.



fwiw, when Sec PM'd me about the birth of his grand daughter, that was one of the main things that really hit home for me, about why I should be more aware of my words on this board. Sec made his point to me from atop his shetland pony without ever saying it. It was just a clarity moment for me.

Katipan
03-23-2009, 09:49 AM
Im sick of political correctness and whiny over-sensitive pussies complaining about anything and everything that offends them. Grow some thicker skin and mind your own business. Like I said, its one thing to call a kid with DS a retard, or to call a homo-sexual a pillowbiter, but if I want to call my buddies that in jest I will.

Yeah yeah I get it.

Your moral signpost is just warped but at least you have one.

MTG#10
03-23-2009, 09:52 AM
And you don't think the parent/grandparent with the Downs child in the next booth over should feel the sting because you think its alright?



I try my best not to use that word if there is a person with Downs nearby, and I also try to refrain from using the words f*g and queer if there is a gay person nearby. But if you dont have Downs and you are straight I dont want to hear your lectures or whining if you hear me say it.

DeezNutz
03-23-2009, 09:54 AM
And you don't think the parent/grandparent with the Downs child in the next booth over should feel the sting because you think its alright?

I'm definitely not a PC person, and I probably would have a similar arguement with some of the other words that draw ire, but I think some words just carry a sharp edge, and this one, is pretty damn sure one of them for people too close to the situation. I've seen the look in the eye of a parent at close range, and its definitely not a faux-hurt/outrage like so many other words hip to hate.



fwiw, when Sec PM'd me about the birth of his grand daughter, that was one of the main things that really hit home for me, about why I should be more aware of my words on this board. Sec made his point to me from atop his shetland pony without ever saying it. It was just a clarity moment for me.

When it comes to one's own children, one's perspective is generally pretty skewed. Thus the sensitivity.

Not saying that it's wrong to have these feelings. There's so much emotion invested in children that it's an understandable reaction.

Garcia Bronco
03-23-2009, 10:14 AM
Interesting take by some of you....evidently most of you believe it's OK to continue to use the word.

It's how your kids learn it is OK to call the Special Needs child "retarded" when they see them at school. I am betting that most of you would be repulsed if someone used the word "homo", the n word, or any other prejudiced word, but think it is OK to use this word freely.

Sad...

mmaddog
*******

I don't care what words people use. I don't try to control their thoughts.

MTG#10
03-23-2009, 10:41 AM
Trying to not say words like retard and queer if there's a gay person or kid with Downs nearby makes me a first rate dickhole Iowanian? Wow. Either you're a ****ing moron or have really poor reading comprehension. My guess is both.

Iowanian
03-23-2009, 10:51 AM
"**** off retard" I think is what you meant to reply, right? Maybe that was just in private.

What makes you a dickhole isn't the lack of saying the word to the afflicted person, its your lack of give-a-damn about collateral damage for the parent-grandparent-sibling you're running your penis garage in front of, without a care "because THEY aren't the retarded person, right? I'm sure you can easily spot the mother of a Downs child from your booth at Chuck E Cheese.


eat at Joe's.

MTG#10
03-23-2009, 11:23 AM
"**** off retard" I think is what you meant to reply, right? Maybe that was just in private.

What makes you a dickhole isn't the lack of saying the word to the afflicted person, its your lack of give-a-damn about collateral damage for the parent-grandparent-sibling you're running your penis garage in front of, without a care "because THEY aren't the retarded person, right? I'm sure you can easily spot the mother of a Downs child from your booth at Chuck E Cheese.


eat at Joe's.
I said I dont say it if there's a person with Downs nearby, and of course I wouldnt say it to a person with Downs. But if you want me to feel bad for saying it when there might happen to be a person nearby thats related to someone with Downs (and that person with Downs isnt actually there), sorry its not going to happen. They should mind their own business and ignore me if it bothers them.

My 10 year old son is overweight. He's not huge, but he is overweight. Do you think I get offended if we're out and hear somebody call their buddy a fat slob? If they said it to my kid they would be missing some teeth but Im not going to get mad at somebody elses conversation that I shouldnt be listening to anyway.

Demonpenz
03-23-2009, 11:25 AM
the thing is autism is a 24 hour a day affliction, where as being fat only effects a person half the time

Mr. Krab
03-23-2009, 11:26 AM
It's pretty much like every other slang negative word. It's ok to call someone the word as long as they aren't.

retard,bitch etc

Sully
03-23-2009, 11:29 AM
I think it's funny that people find out a word is offensive to some, and act as if they are being asked to carry a 2-ton stone to not say that word.

Is it overly-sensitive people some of the time? Absolutely.
But who cares. No one is asking you to change your lifestyle...just to be a little more polite in the world.

DeezNutz
03-23-2009, 11:32 AM
I think it's funny that people find out a word is offensive to some, and act as if they are being asked to carry a 2-ton stone to not say that word.

Is it overly-sensitive people some of the time? Absolutely.
But who cares. No one is asking you to change your lifestyle...just to be a little more polite in the world.

Dude, your sig is one of the great hatchet jobs of the English language. Obama would not approve if he'd see his words in print. Subject-verb agreement. Ambiguous antecedents. Just fucking ugly.

Sully
03-23-2009, 11:33 AM
Dude, your sig is one of the great hatchet jobs of the English language. Obama would not approve if he'd see his words in print. Subject-verb agreement. Ambiguous antecedents. Just fucking ugly.

But the spirit of it is still decipherable.

DeezNutz
03-23-2009, 11:34 AM
But the spirit of it is still decipherable.

Agree to disagree because I see a lot of possible interpretations, and I'm not sure which was his prime mover.

Sully
03-23-2009, 11:35 AM
Agree to disagree because I see a lot of possible interpretations, and I'm not sure which was his prime mover.

When in Rome!

jwazzie
03-23-2009, 01:21 PM
As I have said before, don't say it to me if you know that my son has it or to my son. If you are having a conversation with somebody else, that is your own thing. I hate it but that doesn't mean anything to alot of people and it shouldn't.

Mosbonian
03-23-2009, 07:46 PM
Well hopefully they are not passing him to get him gone....

No they are not...we hold them, and him, to standards that will allow him to function beyond his HS years.

mmaddog
*******

Mecca
03-23-2009, 07:48 PM
I can think of alot worse things I've said.

Mosbonian
03-23-2009, 07:49 PM
I have no problem discouraging the use of the word to poke fun at special needs children if it's actually harmful. I do have a problem where we have to pretend that those people are just like everybody else. First we dropped the "handicapped" moniker because it was somehow offensive. Now we're dropping "retarded". I've looked into my magic 8 ball and I see that somebody asking us to stop saying "special needs" is imminent.

It's a word. If it's used mean then it sounds mean. If it's used appropriately then it's perfectly acceptable. We need to stop banishing words and start banishing oversensitive people.

Would it make you happy if I don't bring this up again Phil?

mmaddog
*******

Mecca
03-23-2009, 07:51 PM
Changing the name of the condition doesn't change the condition...

This PC stuff is out of hand.

Mosbonian
03-23-2009, 07:53 PM
Im sick of political correctness and whiny over-sensitive pussies complaining about anything and everything that offends them. Grow some thicker skin and mind your own business. Like I said, its one thing to call a kid with DS a retard, or to call a homo-sexual a pillowbiter, but if I want to call my buddies that in jest I will. I was talking to a guy at my work the other day and used the word "****ing" as some bitch was walking by and she felt the need to stop, turn to me and tell me how she hates that word. I told her to give me a ****ing break.

You know...I had the same kind of attitude before I was blessed with children. I hope that you never have to learn this lesson the way that I have.

mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
03-23-2009, 07:58 PM
I try my best not to use that word if there is a person with Downs nearby, and I also try to refrain from using the words f*g and queer if there is a gay person nearby. But if you dont have Downs and you are straight I dont want to hear your lectures or whining if you hear me say it.

So what you are saying is if you can identify the Special Needs Child near to you then you won't say anything? I can tell you without reservation you could be standing next to my son and you'd never know his disability.

You're a class piece of work...you probably don't know how many people you have hurt or offended.

mmaddog
*******

Mecca
03-23-2009, 07:59 PM
Is there a reason why people are so easily offended?

Mosbonian
03-23-2009, 08:01 PM
I said I dont say it if there's a person with Downs nearby, and of course I wouldnt say it to a person with Downs. But if you want me to feel bad for saying it when there might happen to be a person nearby thats related to someone with Downs (and that person with Downs isnt actually there), sorry its not going to happen. They should mind their own business and ignore me if it bothers them.

My 10 year old son is overweight. He's not huge, but he is overweight. Do you think I get offended if we're out and hear somebody call their buddy a fat slob? If they said it to my kid they would be missing some teeth but Im not going to get mad at somebody elses conversation that I shouldnt be listening to anyway.

What a pointless attempt at trying to make a comparison....

mmaddog
*******

L.A. Chieffan
03-23-2009, 08:03 PM
if your kid aint retarded than why get mad?

its like my buddy chris rock says, "I love black people but i hate niggers."

chris said that, not me

Mecca
03-23-2009, 08:04 PM
LOL, personally I don't see why people get so offended by what someone they don't know says...if you don't know that person who gives a shit. People care far to much about shit that isn't important.

Now if someone you actually know says that, it may be a different story.

L.A. Chieffan
03-23-2009, 08:06 PM
LOL, personally I don't see why people get so offended by what someone they don't know says...if you don't know that person who gives a shit. People care far to much about shit that isn't important.

Now if someone you actually know says that, it may be a different story.

sc blows and so do all their queer longhaired yuppiescum fans.

the chicks that go there are kinda hot tho

Mecca
03-23-2009, 08:07 PM
sc blows and so do all their queer longhaired yuppiescum fans.

the chicks that go there are kinda hot tho

what kind of word is yuppiescum?

Are you a retard?

luv
03-23-2009, 08:10 PM
LOL, personally I don't see why people get so offended by what someone they don't know says...if you don't know that person who gives a shit. People care far to much about shit that isn't important.

Now if someone you actually know says that, it may be a different story.

You have a son that has a disease that makes him slower than most people. This disease will never go away. Your child gets called names, and he doesn't have the capability of understanding why. You have to deal with trying to explain things to him every time it happens. While I don't think trying to change everyone else is the answer, you can't see why it bothers him? Even a little?

L.A. Chieffan
03-23-2009, 08:10 PM
what kind of word is yuppiescum?

Are you a retard?

iam offended sir. please edjamacate yoself on the correct terminology. fuctional dumbass is the preferred nomenclature.

L.A. Chieffan
03-23-2009, 08:14 PM
they named groat's syndrome after the pittsburgh pirates SS dick groat

Baconeater
03-23-2009, 08:21 PM
Is there a reason why people are so easily offended?
I think it's human nature to be offended by derogatory terms directed at you or the ones you love.

Katipan
03-23-2009, 08:22 PM
what kind of word is yuppiescum?

Are you a retard?

It's an L.A. thing.

Which is in no way exclusive of the other thing.

Phobia
03-23-2009, 08:30 PM
Would it make you happy if I don't bring this up again Phil?

mmaddog
*******


Who cares what I think, Mark? I respect you and your opinion. I just disagree. I don't have to live it every day like you do but I'm a lot closer to it than most, having had a DS stillbirth last Sept. The word doesn't offend me unless it's intended to be offensive.

stevieray
03-23-2009, 08:41 PM
LOL, personally I don't see why people get so offended by what someone they don't know says...if you don't know that person who gives a shit. People care far to much about shit that isn't important.

Hey Buddha...people care far too much...

JASONSAUTO
03-23-2009, 09:38 PM
I will plead guilty to being "overly sensitive"...but I am the one having to deal day-in and day-out with my kid being teased in school about being a "retard" by other kids. Even better is sitting in the office and hearing the parent of the other child ask the school what a "retard" is doing in his kids mainstream class.
It's easy to act complacent when you aren't directly affected.

mmaddog
*******


i'll tell you one thing jasonsauto doesnt have the capability to sit there and listen to ANYONE say something like that. the cops would probably be involved before all was said and done especially if my special needs daughter was also in the room. i can see a child not knowing better but a parent??? time to learn a lesson. sorry.

Rain Man
03-23-2009, 11:07 PM
what kind of word is yuppiescum?




I think it's Latin.

MTG#10
03-24-2009, 09:23 AM
you probably don't know how many people you have hurt or offended.

mmaddog
*******

If there's a lot of retarded kids hanging out in bars and pool halls around the Springfield, MO area probably quite a few. Thats the only places me and my friends really hang out. Its not like I go around using words like retard on family night out with the kids. Get a fucking grip.

chiefzilla1501
03-24-2009, 03:41 PM
Changing the name of the condition doesn't change the condition...

This PC stuff is out of hand.

I have a problem with people who get so hung up on PC stuff that they'll find any way to accuse anyone of being insensitive. I love South Park and Family Guy and laugh hysterically at completely offensive jokes. But I disagree that that means that we can say whatever the hell we want wherever the hell we want. There's always a line. Let me provide a context. I was in a Fraternity years ago where people make fun of people for anything and everything. I saw a guy get put in his place big time for making a holocaust joke. That really put things in perspective for me--there's certain things that shouldn't be joked about.

So I can understand the sensitivity to this issue. Walk into public and you tell me which parents have a kid with Downs. It's almost impossible. Point being, you have no idea who you're offending. If I walked up to you and told your 5-year old kid he's a complete, drooling idiot, you deserve to punch me in the face and I hope there are 5 people who do too. I don't think there's any difference here. I call friends retarded too for being really stupid, and if a parent of a special needs child heard me, I hope he/she would punch me in the face.

I think that's the only fair way to do this. People should stop being offended by people making dumb remarks, but they should be allowed to punch you in the face if you do.

chiefzilla1501
03-24-2009, 03:44 PM
If there's a lot of retarded kids hanging out in bars and pool halls around the Springfield, MO area probably quite a few. Thats the only places me and my friends really hang out. Its not like I go around using words like retard on family night out with the kids. Get a ****ing grip.

I think the point is that you have no idea if a parent in that bar has a kid with special needs. In most scenes I've been in, people who make stupid remarks to the wrong people tend to get their ass kicked. So things sometimes work themselves out.

Katipan
03-24-2009, 03:49 PM
I think that's the only fair way to do this. People should stop being offended by people making dumb remarks, but they should be allowed to punch you in the face if you do.

Heh. I like this.

MTG#10
03-24-2009, 04:49 PM
I think the point is that you have no idea if a parent in that bar has a kid with special needs. In most scenes I've been in, people who make stupid remarks to the wrong people tend to get their ass kicked. So things sometimes work themselves out.

I dont care if someone doesnt like the words I use when Im talking to my friends. As long as I dont say it to your kid, or around your kid mind your own ****ing business.

FAX
03-24-2009, 05:19 PM
This country was founded on demeaning, derogatory terms and you'll have to pry the "R-word" out of my cold, dead mouth.

But, while you're in there, if you wouldn't mind brushing the teeth in my cold, dead mouth, that would be great. I want to look my best at the funeral.

FAX

Demonpenz
03-24-2009, 05:30 PM
I saw a guy get put in his place big time for making a holocaust joke.
.

an ashtray?

Over-Head
03-24-2009, 06:47 PM
This country was founded on demeaning, derogatory terms and you'll have to pry the "R-word" out of my cold, dead mouth.

But, while you're in there, if you wouldn't mind brushing the teeth in my cold, dead mouth, that would be great. I want to look my best at the funeral.

FAX

You been out to the shed?

jidar
03-24-2009, 07:00 PM
If I stop calling them retards will they stop acting retarded?
If not then I really don't see the point.

Mosbonian
03-24-2009, 08:24 PM
To everyone..once again thank you for your valued input. I know there are a lot of differences of opinion, and I can appreciate that.

One other good thing....it helped me note a couple of people who need to go to my ignore list.

mmaddog
*******

Saulbadguy
03-25-2009, 07:25 PM
http://special-olympics.ytmnd.com/

EyePod
03-30-2009, 12:24 PM
I get called retarded twice a day.

Wait, you're not retarded?

EyePod
03-30-2009, 12:28 PM
I wonder if "retard" is going to be the next "coon" or something like that. I know that whenever my grandparents say it, I'm disgusted. Maybe my future grand kids will be embarrassed if I say retarded.

Demonpenz
03-30-2009, 12:35 PM
old people love cacoon