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HonestChieffan
03-23-2009, 02:00 PM
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/20/MNMO16JJDF.DTL&tsp=1
Obama plans huge pledge drive for his policies
President Obama's appearance on "The Tonight Show" - the first ever for a sitting chief executive - was only a small part of the president's so-called permanent campaign. A bigger move comes Saturday, when Obama will ask 13 million people on his campaign e-mail list to go door-to-door to raise support for his agenda.

The Pledge Project Canvass is an unprecedented effort by a president to reach beyond Congress and tap grassroots supporters for help. Volunteers recruited online by Obama's Organizing for America, a post-election group, will ask citizens to sign a pledge in support of the president's policies on energy, health care and education.

Those who pledge will be asked for their e-mail addresses so the Obama-ites can keep in touch.

"This is just the beginning for us," said Jeremy Bird, deputy national director of Organizing for America, in an online video to Obama supporters this week. "The establishment in Washington won't welcome this new direction easily. We can't let this plan be debated solely behind closed doors in Washington, D.C."

Analysts marvel
Technology and political analysts marvel at the potential of Obama's attempt to transfer his successful campaign techniques - a melding of street-level community organizing and new media tools - to advance his policy agenda.

"What Obama is doing is a very new approach," said Lawrence Jacobs, director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the University of Minnesota.

That approach began during the campaign, when Obama tapped into an array of social networking tools on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to rally voters and raise funds. This weekend's effort is the next logical step, Bird said in an interview.

"This is taking that online social networking and moving it to offline social networking," he said.

But beneath the excitement over the White House's virtual populism is the question: What effect will it have? What's the difference between Saturday's door-knocking and petition-signing effort, however digitally organized, and Franklin D. Roosevelt's use of radio to rally the country around his New Deal proposals?

Also, the outreach effort could have a boomerang effect. If the same individuals who joined Obama's army of supporters feel he has overly compromised on some issues, such as health care, they could use those same networks to lash back at him.

"It could be like Frankenstein's monster coming back at him," said Mike Franc, a former staff member for Capitol Hill Republicans who is a congressional liaison for the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.

Administration concerns
The most immediate concern for the administration is making sure the outreach doesn't look to Congress like a postcard-writing campaign by "the usual suspects," Franc said. "If it creates a cross-section of support in a district, then a politician will start looking into his political soul and wondering if he should start supporting Obama."

The challenge will be to reignite the passion that propelled Obama's presidential campaign - but on specific issues.

"The idea of volunteering to help pass a health care plan or help pass a budget is something fewer people have had experience with," said Justin Ruben, executive director of the online liberal organizing site MoveOn.org.

Indeed, Saturday will mark "the first big test of Organizing for America and whether the base that they built during the campaign is still there," said Micah Sifry, editor of TechPresident.com, an online hub for the study of how technology affects politics. "I think there are reasons to believe that it's ebbed quite a bit since the election."

For example, Sifry said, house parties organized last month were sparsely attended in some cases. And the YouTube videos announcing this weekend's pledge drive were receiving less traffic than past Obama videos have.

That could be because Obama is not pitching the pledge drive, Sifry said. (Organizing for America's Mitch Stewart and Bird are the video's stars.) Or it's possible that in the months since the election, Obama's social network has been a little turned off by frequent fundraising appeals and a lack of real opportunity to influence Obama's agenda.

3,500 house parties
But where some saw sparseness in last month's events, Bird said he saw an "unbelievably phenomenal" response: about 3,500 house parties across the nation and 80,000 personal stories uploaded by citizens to the Organizing for America site - with no paid staff or organizers.

In the past, Bird said, "nothing like that would ever happen without a massive number of staff, organizers making countless phone calls. Particularly around something that's not necessarily that sexy when you just see it on face value."

David All, who heads a conservative Web 2.0 agency, said it's almost irrelevant whether this weekend's push results in a horde of canvassers and calls to Congress. Obama's team has taken the long view, he said, and is more focused on continuing to build its social network than on scoring splashy successes.

"It's already succeeded," he said. "Even if they had 100 (participants), that is 100 more than what would have happened without it."

It's a lesson, he said, the conservative opposition has yet to fully grasp. Republican National Committee chair Michael Steele now posts to YouTube, and GOP.com is scheduled for an overhaul. But Obama, he said, remains far ahead in his ability to repeatedly tap the grass roots and maintain what Jimmy Carter adviser Patrick Caddell dubbed the permanent campaign.

"Republicans are still sitting around saying, 'What happened?' " Steele said. "If I were a 2012 candidate, you'd better believe I'd be out there today working against this thing."


Other presidents with direct appeals
Previous U.S. presidents who sought citizen support for domestic agendas:

Franklin D. Roosevelt: Shortly after taking office in 1933, Roosevelt began to broadcast a series of "fireside chats" to rally Americans about his New Deal package of legislation. Congress passed 15 of Roosevelt's major bills in his first 100 days in office.

Ronald Reagan: The former actor was comfortable on camera and used television addresses in his first months in office to connect with viewers - most successfully when he asked voters to write their legislators and urge them to repeal taxes. Measures to do that were passed.

Bill Clinton: Clinton traveled the country in 1993 to push for health care reform. But he, Hillary Rodham Clinton and their surrogates often were met by well-organized opponents. Their package never got a congressional floor vote. Wrote Hillary Clinton in her 2003 memoir: "We soon learned that nothing was off limits in this war and that the other side was far better armed with the tools of political battle: money, media and organization."

George W. Bush: In early 2005, Bush used the "political capital" he asserted he had received from his 2004 re-election to promote a revamping of the Social Security system. He crisscrossed the country to drum up support for his proposal, but after GOP defections, it never even got a vote in Congress.

jjjayb
03-23-2009, 03:59 PM
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/20/MNMO16JJDF.DTL&tsp=1
Obama plans huge pledge drive for his policies
President Obama's appearance on "The Tonight Show" - the first ever for a sitting chief executive - was only a small part of the president's so-called permanent campaign. A bigger move comes Saturday, when Obama will ask 13 million people on his campaign e-mail list to go door-to-door to raise support for his agenda.

The Pledge Project Canvass is an unprecedented effort by a president to reach beyond Congress and tap grassroots supporters for help. Volunteers recruited online by Obama's Organizing for America, a post-election group, will ask citizens to sign a pledge in support of the president's policies on energy, health care and education.

Those who pledge will be asked for their e-mail addresses so the Obama-ites can keep in touch.

"This is just the beginning for us," said Jeremy Bird, deputy national director of Organizing for America, in an online video to Obama supporters this week. "The establishment in Washington won't welcome this new direction easily. We can't let this plan be debated solely behind closed doors in Washington, D.C."

Analysts marvel
Technology and political analysts marvel at the potential of Obama's attempt to transfer his successful campaign techniques - a melding of street-level community organizing and new media tools - to advance his policy agenda.

"What Obama is doing is a very new approach," said Lawrence Jacobs, director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the University of Minnesota.

That approach began during the campaign, when Obama tapped into an array of social networking tools on sites such as Facebook and Twitter to rally voters and raise funds. This weekend's effort is the next logical step, Bird said in an interview.

"This is taking that online social networking and moving it to offline social networking," he said.

But beneath the excitement over the White House's virtual populism is the question: What effect will it have? What's the difference between Saturday's door-knocking and petition-signing effort, however digitally organized, and Franklin D. Roosevelt's use of radio to rally the country around his New Deal proposals?

Also, the outreach effort could have a boomerang effect. If the same individuals who joined Obama's army of supporters feel he has overly compromised on some issues, such as health care, they could use those same networks to lash back at him.

"It could be like Frankenstein's monster coming back at him," said Mike Franc, a former staff member for Capitol Hill Republicans who is a congressional liaison for the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.

Administration concerns
The most immediate concern for the administration is making sure the outreach doesn't look to Congress like a postcard-writing campaign by "the usual suspects," Franc said. "If it creates a cross-section of support in a district, then a politician will start looking into his political soul and wondering if he should start supporting Obama."

The challenge will be to reignite the passion that propelled Obama's presidential campaign - but on specific issues.

"The idea of volunteering to help pass a health care plan or help pass a budget is something fewer people have had experience with," said Justin Ruben, executive director of the online liberal organizing site MoveOn.org.

Indeed, Saturday will mark "the first big test of Organizing for America and whether the base that they built during the campaign is still there," said Micah Sifry, editor of TechPresident.com, an online hub for the study of how technology affects politics. "I think there are reasons to believe that it's ebbed quite a bit since the election."

For example, Sifry said, house parties organized last month were sparsely attended in some cases. And the YouTube videos announcing this weekend's pledge drive were receiving less traffic than past Obama videos have.

That could be because Obama is not pitching the pledge drive, Sifry said. (Organizing for America's Mitch Stewart and Bird are the video's stars.) Or it's possible that in the months since the election, Obama's social network has been a little turned off by frequent fundraising appeals and a lack of real opportunity to influence Obama's agenda.

3,500 house parties
But where some saw sparseness in last month's events, Bird said he saw an "unbelievably phenomenal" response: about 3,500 house parties across the nation and 80,000 personal stories uploaded by citizens to the Organizing for America site - with no paid staff or organizers.

In the past, Bird said, "nothing like that would ever happen without a massive number of staff, organizers making countless phone calls. Particularly around something that's not necessarily that sexy when you just see it on face value."

David All, who heads a conservative Web 2.0 agency, said it's almost irrelevant whether this weekend's push results in a horde of canvassers and calls to Congress. Obama's team has taken the long view, he said, and is more focused on continuing to build its social network than on scoring splashy successes.

"It's already succeeded," he said. "Even if they had 100 (participants), that is 100 more than what would have happened without it."

It's a lesson, he said, the conservative opposition has yet to fully grasp. Republican National Committee chair Michael Steele now posts to YouTube, and GOP.com is scheduled for an overhaul. But Obama, he said, remains far ahead in his ability to repeatedly tap the grass roots and maintain what Jimmy Carter adviser Patrick Caddell dubbed the permanent campaign.

"Republicans are still sitting around saying, 'What happened?' " Steele said. "If I were a 2012 candidate, you'd better believe I'd be out there today working against this thing."


Other presidents with direct appeals
Previous U.S. presidents who sought citizen support for domestic agendas:

Franklin D. Roosevelt: Shortly after taking office in 1933, Roosevelt began to broadcast a series of "fireside chats" to rally Americans about his New Deal package of legislation. Congress passed 15 of Roosevelt's major bills in his first 100 days in office.

Ronald Reagan: The former actor was comfortable on camera and used television addresses in his first months in office to connect with viewers - most successfully when he asked voters to write their legislators and urge them to repeal taxes. Measures to do that were passed.

Bill Clinton: Clinton traveled the country in 1993 to push for health care reform. But he, Hillary Rodham Clinton and their surrogates often were met by well-organized opponents. Their package never got a congressional floor vote. Wrote Hillary Clinton in her 2003 memoir: "We soon learned that nothing was off limits in this war and that the other side was far better armed with the tools of political battle: money, media and organization."

George W. Bush: In early 2005, Bush used the "political capital" he asserted he had received from his 2004 re-election to promote a revamping of the Social Security system. He crisscrossed the country to drum up support for his proposal, but after GOP defections, it never even got a vote in Congress.

I can't wait to get one of these idiots at my door.

HonestChieffan
03-23-2009, 04:15 PM
I can't wait to get one of these idiots at my door.

You could host a party!

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 04:20 PM
I'll have you know us Obots have been moving constantly up to and ever since the election for a vast array of his policies.

Amnorix
03-23-2009, 04:23 PM
Sadly, this is the directon of politics in America. We've already moved a long way from the "rocking chair campaigns" of the 1800s, and now we're going to a whole new level. It's a product of our never stop moving society in the new millenium.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 04:25 PM
I actually don't see what's wrong with increased activism in American politics, Amnorix.

Duck Dog
03-23-2009, 04:30 PM
Obots; the Jahovah Witness of politics.

Amnorix
03-23-2009, 04:35 PM
I actually don't see what's wrong with increased activism in American politics, Amnorix.

Campaigning isn't governance. The time spent by politicians on fund raising and organizing and all that business is NOT time spent on the actual jobs to which they were appointed.

Activisim in American politics is fine, but not at the cost of having our elected leaders not doing their jobs for an even longer period of time. The Presidential election cycle is already about two years -- half of the President's term.

jAZ
03-23-2009, 04:57 PM
Sadly, this is the directon of politics in America. We've already moved a long way from the "rocking chair campaigns" of the 1800s, and now we're going to a whole new level. It's a product of our never stop moving society in the new millenium.

What about this is sad? It's an engaged and empowered population. That's one of the greatest things about the Obama campaign. It effectively disempowers the media while engaging the voters directly.

Hell, it's what the Christians have been doing for 20 years now. Obama has just figured out how to get the less homogenous left to act in concert like the right has for years.

HonestChieffan
03-23-2009, 04:58 PM
With the way he is fixing things and implementing change his supporters will have plenty of time to devote to volunteering since the job market is so robust.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 05:30 PM
Campaigning isn't governance. The time spent by politicians on fund raising and organizing and all that business is NOT time spent on the actual jobs to which they were appointed.

Activisim in American politics is fine, but not at the cost of having our elected leaders not doing their jobs for an even longer period of time. The Presidential election cycle is already about two years -- half of the President's term.

I think that's a fair point of view -- I just completely disagree.

Saul Good
03-23-2009, 07:26 PM
Campaigning isn't governance. It's all he knows.

wild1
03-23-2009, 07:41 PM
if an Obama missionary comes to my door i'll tell him to give me his address, and when my Obama check comes in the mail I'll donate

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:24 PM
I live in a deed restricted community with no soliciting allowed. I'm gonna call the cops and have 'em arrested.
Let 'em have their Tupperware party elsewhere. Same goes for any Rs.

Jenson71
03-23-2009, 08:27 PM
I usually like getting into theological discussions with door knockers. But I like the Obots. :(

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:31 PM
I usually like getting into theological discussions with door knockers. But I like the Obots. :(

I tell the JW's that I'm a Hindu. One wanted to know all about it sincerely, once, and I didn't know what to say.

Jenson71
03-23-2009, 08:36 PM
Can you imagine the battle that would go down between the Obot and the Witness who enter the same lawn at the same time glaring at the long front porch, slowing turning towards each other, then back to the porch, calculating their stride length and the distance to the door?

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:39 PM
Can you imagine the battle that would go down between the Obot and the Witness who enter the same lawn at the same time glaring at the long front porch, slowing turning towards each other, then back to the porch, calculating their stride length and the distance to the door?

Armageddon? Or separation of church and state? aka one at a time single file neither on the property at the same time.

alanm
03-23-2009, 09:44 PM
A bigger move comes Saturday, when Obama will ask 13 million people on his campaign e-mail list to go door-to-door to raise support for his agenda.

How many will come back unscathed? :D

Velvet_Jones
03-24-2009, 12:01 AM
I'll have you know us Obots have been moving constantly up to and ever since the election for a vast array of his policies.

Man - you are the equivalent of Hitlers youth. Why don't you do something constructive like creating something rather than try to attack success. You and your ilk are a bunch of ignorant - yet scary people. You are not only UnAmerican - you are a stupid person that is UnAmerican.

I can't wait until you have a little responsibility, then when you have to start paying for this crap - you will start shitting you pants. You are a stupid - stupid person.

What did your parent do to? What did your grand parents do? You obviously do not understand how this country was built.

I have no way of relating to someone that is as stupid as you.

Velvet_Jones
03-24-2009, 12:07 AM
What about this is sad? It's an engaged and empowered population. That's one of the greatest things about the Obama campaign. It effectively disempowers the media while engaging the voters directly.

Hell, it's what the Christians have been doing for 20 years now. Obama has just figured out how to get the less homogenous left to act in concert like the right has for years.

jAZ - there are two misspelled words in this comment. You are a stupid fucking idiot. Chickens come home to roost. You can thank yourself and Banyon for that. He a big pussy, just like you.

memyselfI
03-24-2009, 11:56 AM
I live in a deed restricted community with no soliciting allowed. I'm gonna call the cops and have 'em arrested.
Let 'em have their Tupperware party elsewhere. Same goes for any Rs.

ROFL:clap:

I signed up for fake email address incase they come to my door. No way in hell I'd give them my real address and I don't want them putting me on a hatah's list.

Fish
03-24-2009, 01:32 PM
Man - you are the equivalent of Hitlers youth. Why don't you do something constructive like creating something rather than try to attack success. You and your ilk are a bunch of ignorant - yet scary people. You are not only UnAmerican - you are a stupid person that is UnAmerican.

I can't wait until you have a little responsibility, then when you have to start paying for this crap - you will start shitting you pants. You are a stupid - stupid person.

What did your parent do to? What did your grand parents do? You obviously do not understand how this country was built.

I have no way of relating to someone that is as stupid as you.

http://media.gamespy.com/columns/image/article/550/550110/the-top-10-unannounced-star-wars-games-and-guides--20040921033110332.jpg

Yes.... yes...... let the HATE flow through you......

alpha_omega
03-24-2009, 01:40 PM
Ok...this is a serious question...when they come to the door, what are they going to say?

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 01:56 PM
Ok...this is a serious question...when they come to the door, what are they going to say?

Stay home and find out. Or call them ahead of time.

trndobrd
03-24-2009, 02:27 PM
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/251/story/64644.html

Congress isn't feeling much heat from Obama's 'army'

WASHINGTON President Barack Obama's army of canvassers fanned out across the nation over the weekend to drum up support for his $3.55 trillion budget, but they had no noticeable impact on members of Congress, who on Monday said they were largely unaware of the effort.

"News to me," said Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, a House Budget Committee member, of the canvassing. Later, his staff said that his office had heard from about 100 voters.

The president's lieutenants tried to open a new front in the "Obama revolution," the grassroots mobilization that propelled the once little-known Illinois senator to the White House last year. David Plouffe, who ran Obama's campaign, now runs "Organizing for America" out of the Democratic National Committee. It uses the same Web-based tactics that won the presidency to mobilize public opinion behind Obama's initiatives in a bid to redefine "business as usual" in Washington.

"The budget that passes Congress has the potential to take our country in a truly new direction the kind of change we all worked so hard for," Plouffe said in an e-mail alert to Obama followers last week. He asked them to rally people in their hometowns behind Obama's budget.

Over the weekend, Obama supporters knocked on an estimated 1 million doors in all 50 states. Canvassers asked people to sign a two-point pledge saying that they support Obama's "bold approach for renewing America's economy," and that they'll ask family, friends and neighbors to back it.

"How many of these folks have read the budget?" wondered Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., a House Financial Services Committee member.

Congressional committees will start rewriting Obama's budget this week. Obama's biggest Capitol Hill problem appears to be conservative and moderate Democrats, who are challenging his fiscal 2010 budget blueprint.

Some lawmakers saw value in the canvassing.

"Anything that raises the profile of the challenges we face is very important," said Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., a Budget Committee member.

Trying to mobilize voters to rally behind a complex, multi-trillion dollar budget that Congress will take months to enact is a different task from winning votes for a presidential candidate.

"You live in Terre Haute, Indiana, or suburban Denver, and someone you don't know knocks on the door and talks politics the election is over," said Peter Brown, the assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute in Connecticut. "I'm not sure if it will make a big difference."

Still, Brown concedes that it's early enough in Obama's presidency and he's still popular enough that some people will listen and give Obama "the benefit of the doubt" on his agenda.

"They're scared about their income future," Brown said.

The group Obama most needs to lobby this week are the approximately 51 conservative-to-moderate Democrats in the House of Representatives and the 16 in the Senate. Their numbers are big enough in both chambers to deny the president the majorities he needs to win budget approval, assuming near-unanimous Republican opposition as well.

Centrist Democrats disagree with Obama's plan to increase spending on most domestic programs by about 9 percent next year. They want no spending increase.

Congress has to "develop a realistic plan for putting our country back on a path to fiscal responsibility," said Rep. Charlie Melancon, D-La., a leader of the moderate Democratic Blue Dog Coalition. "It is vital that we begin working to bring our books back to balance, using tools such as (mandatory) pay-as-you-go budgeting."

Blue Dogs were careful not to criticize Obama, but said they've felt little pressure from the canvassing.

Rep. Melissa Bean, D-Ill., once a coalition member but now vice-chair of the New Democrat Coalition, said she wasn't aware of the effort and has heard no response to it from her district.

Meanwhile, established liberal groups are gearing up to stop the Blue Dogs in more traditional ways. The Campaign for America's Future and other groups have scheduled a joint news conference for Tuesday to announce what they term a "new campaign to dog the Blue Dogs."

In a statement, they said that "President Obama is back in campaign mode as he pushes for a budget proposal that has faced opposition from a group of Democratic senators led by Sen. Evan Bayh," a moderate from Indiana.

In addition, Obama is expected to tout his budget on Tuesday night in a prime-time news conference.

Chief Faithful
03-24-2009, 02:41 PM
What about this is sad? It's an engaged and empowered population. That's one of the greatest things about the Obama campaign. It effectively disempowers the media while engaging the voters directly.

Hell, it's what the Christians have been doing for 20 years now. Obama has just figured out how to get the less homogenous left to act in concert like the right has for years.

"Everyone imposes his own system as far as his army can reach." Joseph Stalin

Obots! March!