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Direckshun
03-23-2009, 06:28 PM
http://www.democracycorps.com/strategy/2009/03/report-on-the-obama-generation/?section=Analysis

March 23, 2009
Analysis » Report on the Obama Generation

Republicans “on the Precipice of Becoming Irrelevant:” Obama and Republicans Square off Among Younger People

In a recent interview with Rachel Maddow, John McCain’s daughter Meghan McCain warned her party that it was, “on the precipice of becoming irrelevant to young people.” This conclusion comes in the wake of a 66 to 32 percent drubbing by young people in the 2008 elections. Our survey of young people taken three months after the election underscores the alienation of Republicans from the millennial generational. By a 59 to 14 percent margin, young people prefer the Democrats when it comes to “paying attention to issues that affect younger people,” a six point gain since 2007.

Republicans struggle among young people for a very specific reason. At a time when young people are paying close attention to politics and when so many are struggling economically, even more so than older generations, the Republicans simply do not speak to the reality of their lives or to the issues important to them. This perception stands in marked contrast to their reaction to Barack Obama. Nationally, voters’ opinion of the President may have cooled slightly—and inevitably—in recent weeks, but among younger voters, he has never been more popular. They strongly support his economic policy and are confident that he will make a difference in their lives.

Still, progressives have real challenges among young people as well. While young people broadly support Barack Obama, not all of this energy and enthusiasm transfers to Democrats running in 2010. For instance, young people betray symptoms of dropping out of the electorate in the 2010 elections. Only 46 percent of the electorate that gave Barack Obama 66 percent of the vote share five months ago strongly commit to turning out in 2010. In coming months, Democracy Corps will launch several studies looking at the problem of 2010 drop-off voters and younger people will figure largely in this conversation.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image001.gif

Republicans on the Brink

In young people’s eyes, the Republican Party has little to offer them. Favorability ratings for the Republicans have improved slightly as election passions cooled, but a shockingly small number of young people describe the Republicans as “tolerant,” “on their side,” “representing change” or “having real plans for the country.” Young people give the Democrats a 32-point advantage on their most important issue, “the economy” (up 8 points from 2007) and a 45-point advantage on “paying attention to issues that affect young people” (up 6 points from 2007).

What seems to be driving young people further away from the Republican Party since the election is not Republican obstruction in Congress or even the kind of extremism that provoked Meghan McCain to take on Ann Coulter. Rather, it is failure to speak to their lives in a fashion that is meaningful to them.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image002.gif

Focus on Obama

Young people are paying attention to Washington. Nearly half (45 percent) of young people watched the President’s prime time address on February 24th and 75 percent describe themselves as following the Obama administration closely. Even among young people who are not registered to vote, a 60 percent majority say they have watched the Administration carefully.

What they have seen is a President addressing their primary issue concern boldly and who seems to speak to the reality of their lives. As a result, their support for this President improved markedly since the election. Obama’s favorability stands at 65 percent positive and 21 percent negative, up from 58 percent positive, 31 percent negative in October, 2008. His job approval scores stand at a monumental 74 percent approval, with just 17 percent disapproving. These advances take place throughout the entire generation, but particularly among those groups who proved more resistant through the campaign, such as “older” (age 24-29) white men, whites in the South, white blue collar, as well as white independents. Among liberal-moderate Republicans, 67 percent approve of the job performance of this Democratic president so far.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image003.gif

Young people support the stimulus package convincingly (68 percent favor, 20 percent oppose) and in much higher numbers than older Americans.[1] Young people doing well financially are only marginally less likely to support the plan (65 percent favor) than young people overall and even among Republicans, only 47 percent oppose.

Young people believe the stimulus plan will work, not only in improving the economy overall, but also in improving their own lives in particular. A 71 percent majority describe themselves as confident the stimulus plan will work overall, 68 percent are confident it will improve their own situation, including 68 percent of those who describe their personal economic situation as just fair or poor. At the same time, this confidence is somewhat measured and realistic – just 19 percent describe themselves as “very confident” the stimulus plan will work for them.

The deficit is a significant issue among young people, one that could grow over time, but for now young people believe economic recovery over the long term is more dependent on making investments than controlling the deficit.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image004.gif

When asked what particularly about the stimulus plan has the most promise for their own lives, the interest this cohort always shows in college affordability makes itself plain (42 percent). But the second leading response is the $400 tax break for individuals and $800 tax break for families. At minimum, this may be the most tactile aspect of the stimulus program; moreover, $400 is not an insignificant sum of money for those just entering the job market.

This overwhelming support for Obama’s economic plan reflects not just partisanship, but the economic reality of young people’s lives. As we have reported before, this economic crisis has hit young people particularly hard. A 61 percent majority of young people describe their own economic situation as “only fair” or “poor.” Less educated young people, not surprisingly, seem to be having a harder time of it and unmarried women (72 percent “only fair” or “poor”) are among the most economically marginalized groups in this cohort. As telling, nearly one in five (19 percent) young people in this survey describe themselves as unemployed/looking for work, 31 percent among high school educated women.[2]

A 52 percent majority agree, “I am one pay check away from having to borrow money from my parents or credit carts,” just 38 percent say “I have enough savings to fall back on if something minor goes wrong with my finances.” The margin between the first statement and the second statement grew by 7 points in last four months.[3]

Potentially Serious Turnout Issues Could Face Democrats in 2010

The stakes in 2010 could scarcely be higher. With redistricting looming, a majority (38) of the nation’s governors will be decided, including 18 open-seats. No less than 56 Democratic freshmen and sophomores will be defending their seats and of the 28 congressional elections identified to by Charlie Cook as competitive, 21 are held by Democrats. The immediate problem progressives’ face is that too few base groups commit to vote in the 2010 election. The problem is not any disappointment or let down with Obama, but the gap between enthusiasm for Obama and enthusiasm for Democrats. This also reflects, of course, the natural drop in voting we see in off-year elections, a trend that has been historically higher among young people.

Less than half (47 percent) of young people who voted in 2008 strongly commit to voting in 2010.[4] Among all youth, just 34 percent strongly commit to turning out next year. In contrast, among all 2008 voters, a 68 percent majority commit to voting.[5] The problem grows steadily worse among more Democratic oriented voters relative to more conservative younger voters. Among 2008 Obama voters, 46 percent commit to voting, compared to 54 percent among McCain voters. There are other examples as well.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image005.gif

In a generic trial heat, “the Democratic Candidate” enjoys a 23-point margin over an unnamed Republican (53 to 31 percent). However, this Democratic margin closes to just 9 points among core voters[6] and 12 points among those most likely to vote. Among potential drop-off voters, Democrats enjoy a 31-point generic advantage.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image006.gif

There is no evidence, looking at drop-off voters, that their unconvincing commitment to voting in 2010 reflects disappointment with Obama; in fact, potential drop-off voters consistently show higher number for the President and his program than other voters.

In fact, it is the separation of Obama from his party that is cause for concern. In favorability scores, numbers rose slightly for Democrats since the election, but dramatically for Obama; Obama’s mean favorability rating improved by 7 points, reflecting a 17-point gain in his positive-to-negative favorability ratings. His party only manages a 2-point improvement on the mean score and a 5-point improvement on its positive-to-negative rating.

http://www.democracycorps.com/wp-content/uploads/image/dcyp032309m1_files/image007.gif

Conclusion

In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan captured the youth vote and even today, Generation X voters are among the most conservative in the electorate. However, Democrats in the 1980’s were much better positioned among young people than the Republicans are in this current period. With only 14 percent preferring the Republicans as the party that best pays attention to their issues, it is hard to describe this party as particularly relevant to young people.

The Republican road back is a long and hard one and it may be too late for this generation. It is not just the many short-comings young people see in this party—and they are legion—that haunts them, but the studied contrast between what they are offering today’s youth and what young people see coming out of the Administration.

Of course, Obama is unlikely to sustain this level of enthusiasm for four years, even among young people, but the immediate problem progressives face for this generation is the separation we see between Obama and Democrats, a separation that carries a serious political consequence for 2010.

stevieray
03-23-2009, 06:31 PM
you go girl...

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 06:37 PM
I wouldn't trust that source...it's the GOP's rivals. It's what they want to happen.
The young are being attracted to libertarianism or small govt.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 06:42 PM
I wouldn't trust that source...it's the GOP's rivals. It's what they want to happen.
The young are being attracted to libertarianism or small govt.

D Corps is a Democratic polling service, sure, but that doesn't account for 30+ points in pro-Democrat polling. D Corps NEVER slants that much during election seasons.

I await your polling data on your final point. I think you're just one of those people that makes up statistics, such as your laughable claim that ChiefsPlanet is representative of America at large.

Fat Elvis
03-23-2009, 06:43 PM
Apparently they are targeting the one armed midget demographic.....



But, he (Michael Steele) elaborated with a laugh, “we need to uptick our image with everyone, including one-armed midgets.”

http://media.washingtontimes.com/media/img/photos/2009/02/19/20090218-230402-pic-211220841_r350x200.jpg?0babd24c675f3097b9d1ff106ec8653055db7939

wild1
03-23-2009, 06:44 PM
you ought to have to be 25 years old to vote, and you should have to prove you worked full time for at least 75% of the past year.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 06:46 PM
you ought to have to be 25 years old to vote, and you should have to prove you worked full time for at least 75% of the past year.

hahahahahaha

Thaaaaaaaaaaaaaat oughtta win the youth vote.

wild1
03-23-2009, 06:49 PM
hahahahahaha

Thaaaaaaaaaaaaaat oughtta win the youth vote.

Eh.

I don't want people running the country who have never provided for themselves or otherwise lived in the real world.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 06:53 PM
Eh.

I don't want people running the country who have never provided for themselves or otherwise lived in the real world.

So your answer to this question is:

Not only should the GOP NOT reach out to young voters, but they should actively work to block them out from the political process altogether.

Crazy thing is, I am 100% certain there's a good number of conservatives here who'll agree with you. I'm certain there'll be no more than a couple conservatives the DISagree with you.

And that's why you guys lost in November.

wild1
03-23-2009, 06:55 PM
So your answer to this question is:

Not only should the GOP NOT reach out to young voters, but they should actively work to block them out from the political process altogether.

Crazy thing is, I am 100% certain there's a good number of conservatives here who'll agree with you. I'm certain there'll be no more than a couple conservatives the DISagree with you.

And that's why you guys lost in November.

No... the Republican ticket lost because they didn't put a Republican on it.

mlyonsd
03-23-2009, 06:55 PM
What is the Republican Party doing to reach out to young voters?

Since 'sit back while someone else bails everyone else out' is already taken I'm not sure the best way to approach kids of today.

I'm pretty sure get your ass out there and make your own way isn't going to work.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 06:59 PM
D Corps is a Democratic polling service, sure, but that doesn't account for 30+ points in pro-Democrat polling. D Corps NEVER slants that much during election seasons.

Those polls change depending on results in the country. The Rs had a run for awhile too. Nothing stays the same forever.
I await your polling data on your final point. I think you're just one of those people that makes up statistics, such as your laughable claim that ChiefsPlanet is representative of America at large.
That's funny I didn't see that I put up any statistics. I said CP was like a microcosm of America. There's moderates, libertarians, conservative and progressives and anarcho-socialists here. It has a better mix than some football boards dominated by Rs only.

Other than that, I have no polling data, except that the young don't want our debt. and the debt that's coming. And that debt is coming big time. Other than that I have anecdotal which is that the L party grew during the last election cycle and was mostly with young people. And if you look at the R primary vote numbers where Paul got votes, they were the young people in the R party. Mac got the older folks. So there are trends with youth. Afterall, it's more their future that's at stake today. Just wait when the economy doesn't recover quickly enough and more liberties are lost. It just may be that both parties will be on the ropes.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:02 PM
Of fucking course they don't want debt.

Who the fuck wants debt?

That doesn't mean you can't support the stimulus package, which by the way, they do. In droves.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:03 PM
No... the Republican ticket lost because they didn't put a Republican on it.

And they legislated like liberal democrats—spend, spend, spend.

I mean really who was gnashing their teeth about the bailout being crony capitalism and about Rs being in bed with corps. Now the Ds are doing it. It amazes me that anyone sees a real difference. That's the blind leading the blind.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:04 PM
Of ****ing course they don't want debt.

Who the **** wants debt?

That doesn't mean you can't support the stimulus package, which by the way, they do. In droves.

So now, where are your statistics that the young support the stimulus in droves? Pot meet kettle.

Even if they do, they're too young to know or have experienced where this leads. They'll change their minds. Except the hard-core activists....and even some of those will. They will if they're young. That's part of youth. Youthful indiscretion.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:11 PM
So now, where are your statistics that the young support the stimulus in droves? Pot meet kettle.

According to D Corps, which I JUST POSTED TO START THIS THREAD, they support the stimulus package by a 48-point margin.

Care to explain that one away? Think D Corps is slanting poll results 50 points per issue?

This ain't pot/kettle. It's pot/dragon.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:12 PM
And that's why you guys lost in November.

Don't forget that the D congresses poll numbers were lower than Bush's.
Maybe, the people thought putting more Ds in would stop the madness. But it's not stopping it, just like they wouldn't stop the funding of troops in Iraq to bring them home. As far as spending goes, 83% in a Gallup Poll say they disapprove of redistribution to handle what we're in. That poll was about 2 weeks ago.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:14 PM
According to D Corps, which I JUST POSTED TO START THIS THREAD, they support the stimulus package by a 48-point margin.

Care to explain that one away? Think D Corps is slanting poll results 50 points per issue?

This ain't pot/kettle. It's pot/dragon.

I was talking about D polls. Oh, I'm getting level-headed Direckshun angry.
I don't trust a self-serving poll. Like I said originally.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:14 PM
Don't forget that the D congresses poll numbers were lower than Bush's.
Maybe, the people thought putting more Ds in would stop the madness. But it's not stopping it, just like they wouldn't stop the funding of troops in Iraq to bring them home. As far as spending goes, 83% in a Gallup Poll say they disapprove of redistribution to handle what we're in. That poll was about 2 weeks ago.

Congress' numbers have actually climbed since Bush left office.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:15 PM
I was talking about D polls.

...what?

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:16 PM
Congress' numbers have actually climbed since Bush left office.
By how much? Gallup's numbers still show that most don't support redistribution.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:17 PM
I don't trust a self-serving poll. Like I said originally.

You keep adding stuff to your posts after the fact so forgive me if I keep missing out some of the stuff you're adding.

So according to this newly-minted quote of yours, you're willing to dismiss a 48-point favorability difference? You honestly think D Corps is slanting their numbers 50 points across the issues?

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:18 PM
By how much? Gallup's numbers still show that most don't support redistribution.

Last I read, they've shot up from a subterranean 10% to a merely dispicable 30%.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:18 PM
...what?

Your D corps is what I meant. I checked it out. It's a partisan site. I mean Carville? How partisan can you get.

Direckshun
03-23-2009, 07:20 PM
Your D corps is what I meant. I checked it out. It's a partisan site.

Forget the fact that it posted far fewer outliers in the last couple elections than most nonpartisan sites, right?

And even if it is partisan, that accounts for a 48-point favorability rating?

I HAVE YET to see you respond to this, and I think we know why.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:27 PM
Forget the fact that it posted far fewer outliers in the last couple elections than most nonpartisan sites, right?

And even if it is partisan, that accounts for a 48-point favorability rating?

I HAVE YET to see you respond to this, and I think we know why.

Per Gallup congress's rating is up to 39% as of 3/5th. So yes it is up. It's up much higher among Democrats though. Somewhat higher among Is. When there is a new govt, the polls are usually higher in the beginning.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/116530/Approval-Congress-Hits-Four-Year-High-Fueled-Dems.aspx

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:30 PM
Forget the fact that it posted far fewer outliers in the last couple elections than most nonpartisan sites, right?

And even if it is partisan, that accounts for a 48-point favorability rating?

I HAVE YET to see you respond to this, and I think we know why.
I said I don't trust their polling is all. I don't care what it did before either.

Jenson71
03-23-2009, 07:33 PM
Eh.

I don't want people running the country who have never provided for themselves or otherwise lived in the real world.

I'm sort of in agreement, but most of the 18-29 population that votes probably do provide for themselves in some way, a good deal of them have families, wife, kids, and almost all have taken some class on government and American history, and about 1/3 have either gone through college or are experiencing it now.

It's only a good idea to allow kids to get interested in politics, history, civics early on. The kids who follow that stuff and are more knowledgeable about it will take part in it. The kids who don't care: their views won't really matter anyway, since they won't vote, won't join organizations, won't talk about to others.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:34 PM
Rasmussen Reports


Most Americans Say Let AIG Go Out of Business, Political Class Disagrees
Saturday, March 21, 2009


Fifty-nine percent (59%) of American adults say it’s better for the economy to let American International Group (AIG) go out of business rather than providing federal subsidies to keep the insurance giant afloat.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that only 18% think it’s better to provide the subsidies while 24% are not sure.

But those who align with America’s Political Class have a fundamentally different view. By a 70% to 11% margin, the Political Class believes it is better to keep AIG in business through subsidies.

At the other extreme, 73% of Populists say it’s better to let AIG go out of business. Populists represent a majority of the country and it’s reasonable to consider their views as the views of Mainstream America.

Those who find themselves in the middle, between the Political Class and Mainstream America, say it’s better to let AIG go by a 44% to 22% margin.

Jenson71
03-23-2009, 07:34 PM
Per Gallup congress's rating is up to 39% as of 3/5th. So yes it is up. It's up much higher among Democrats though. Somewhat higher among Is. When there is a new govt, the polls are usually higher in the beginning.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/116530/Approval-Congress-Hits-Four-Year-High-Fueled-Dems.aspx

I don't trust that. I think it's more like 95% approval.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:38 PM
Rasmussen Update Poll as of last week March 17

Generic Congressional Ballot
Republicans Take Small Lead on Generic Congressional Ballot

Support for the Democratic Congressional candidates fell to a new low over the past week, allowing the GOP to move slightly head for the first time in recent years in the Generic Congressional Ballot.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that 41% said they would vote for their district’s Republican candidate while 39% would choose the Democrat.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that 41% said they would vote for their district’s Republican candidate while 39% would choose the Democrat.

Democrats began the year holding a six or seven point lead over the GOP for the first several weeks of 2009. Over the past month, the gap has been smaller, with Democrats holding a two-to-four point lead. It remains to be seen whether the current results reflect lasting change or statistical noise.


BTW Direckshun, I voted D in 2006.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:40 PM
I don't trust that. I think it's more like 95% approval.

Well, I did just put some additional non-partisan ( not a Democrat polling center claiming to be independent) polling numbers up.

Things do not stay the same. They change subject to what is going on in DC.

wild1
03-23-2009, 07:40 PM
I'm sort of in agreement, but most of the 18-29 population that votes probably do provide for themselves in some way, a good deal of them have families, wife, kids, and almost all have taken some class on government and American history, and about 1/3 have either gone through college or are experiencing it now.

It's only a good idea to allow kids to get interested in politics, history, civics early on. The kids who follow that stuff and are more knowledgeable about it will take part in it. The kids who don't care: their views won't really matter anyway, since they won't vote, won't join organizations, won't talk about to others.

I want people voting who work for a living and provide for themselves.

I want people who look at a pay stub and notice the difference between gross and net.

I want people who do taxes and see how much money the federal government takes from them in a given year, and not just how much their refund is.

Most of all, I want people who are productive members of society running this country - producers, not consumers.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 07:43 PM
Democrats began the year holding a six or seven point lead over the GOP for the first several weeks of 2009. Over the past month, the gap has been smaller, with Democrats holding a two-to-four point lead. It remains to be seen whether the current results reflect lasting change or statistical noise.

Separate Rasmussen polling released last week found that ratings for Congressional leaders of both parties have changed little over the past month and remain largely unfavorable.

Just 19% believe Congress has passed legislation to improve life in America over the past year.


http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/mood_of_america/congressional_ballot/generic_congressional_ballot


Keep it up boys!

Jenson71
03-23-2009, 07:48 PM
I want people voting who work for a living and provide for themselves.

I want people who look at a pay stub and notice the difference between gross and net.

I want people who do taxes and see how much money the federal government takes from them in a given year, and not just how much their refund is.

Most of all, I want people who are productive members of society running this country - producers, not consumers.

Most of the voters are like that. Most voters are normal people, not mythical welfare queens or high school drop out stoners.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:30 PM
I think Direckshun ran away from me. He got owned. :D

Nightfyre
03-23-2009, 08:38 PM
So now, where are your statistics that the young support the stimulus in droves? Pot meet kettle.

Even if they do, they're too young to know or have experienced where this leads. They'll change their minds. Except the hard-core activists....and even some of those will. They will if they're young. That's part of youth. Youthful indiscretion.

I feel so mischaracterized.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:40 PM
I feel so mischaracterized.

There's always an exception that proves the rule. You are blessed with insight at an early age.
Of course it's your line of work too. That helps.

Nightfyre
03-23-2009, 08:40 PM
There's always an exception that proves the rule. You are blessed with insight at an early age.

lol. I was just razzin' anyway.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:42 PM
lol. I was just razzin' anyway.

Oh I know. Just wanted to continue it. But I do think that if ya' wanna know.
Direckshun could use some direction.

Nightfyre
03-23-2009, 08:44 PM
Maybe if the republicans got back to their roots, they would be more popular :shrug: I use the term roots loosely of course as the roots to which I refer are decades gone.

BucEyedPea
03-23-2009, 08:46 PM
Maybe if the republicans got back to their roots, they would be more popular :shrug: I use the term roots loosely of course as the roots to which I refer are decades gone.

I'd say nearly a century plus. We live in a Hamiltonian America.
You have to read Hamilton's Curse by deLorenzo NF. It's right up your ally. Seriously. It's not a tome either. A short book.

Nightfyre
03-23-2009, 08:56 PM
I'll look it up when I find time to read what Ive already got on my plate. lol Keeping up with the industry today is tough.

Simplex3
03-23-2009, 09:04 PM
Of fucking course they don't want debt.

Who the fuck wants debt?

That doesn't mean you can't support the stimulus package, which by the way, they do. In droves.

Young people are, by definition, young, inexperience, and lack the perspective to know what is in their best interest. Especially those who have never supported themselves.

Rigodan
03-24-2009, 12:07 AM
Young people are, by definition, young, inexperience, and lack the perspective to know what is in their best interest. Especially those who have never supported themselves.

I agree. I myself am a young person and we are a bunch of dumbasses.

SNR
03-24-2009, 12:37 AM
...but a shockingly small number of young people describe the Republicans as “tolerant,” “on their side,” “representing change” or “having real plans for the country.” Young people give the Democrats a 32-point advantage on their most important issue, “the economy” (up 8 points from 2007) and a 45-point advantage on “paying attention to issues that affect young people” (up 6 points from 2007)That's hilarious. Is that actually how they worded questions?

What the hell does any of that mean? "On their side." What does that mean? What do young people fucking want so you get on their side? I think most young people are level-headed enough to not blindly say, "fuck rich people. I need help paying off my student loans." but that's not quite what the Democrats are doing. If it's all about tax help, I have several students who didn't receive jack shit help from the federal government after doing their taxes.

I'm 28 so I guess I fall into this category, but I've been employed by a university as a music professor since earning my masters at age 23, and apart from finishing up my doctoral studies coming up here and receiving a pay raise, I've pretty much reached where I want to go as far as a career is concerned. Yet I'm being looped in with a high schooler who still hasn't finished puberty yet and is mostly a reactionary voter to the past 8 years, because that's all he/she has ever known. A full time job isn't even the at the forefront of his/her mind.

Reaper16
03-24-2009, 09:28 AM
I think that a lot of young people are more concerned with social issues than economic issues. I hardly ever see even a college student who is up in arms about an economic issue, but the passion surrounding issues of LGBT rights or stem-cell research, etc(from both left and right minded young people) can be overwhelming. For an ever-increasing majority of young people, the Republican party takes stances on most social issues that alienate those young people.

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 09:30 AM
The republican party doesn't have to reach out for young voters. What will happen is young voters will get jobs and start paying taxes and realize that money is liberally getting stolen from them. Then their attitude will change.

jAZ
03-24-2009, 09:44 AM
D Corps is a Democratic polling service, sure, but that doesn't account for 30+ points in pro-Democrat polling. D Corps NEVER slants that much during election seasons.

I await your polling data on your final point. I think you're just one of those people that makes up statistics, such as your laughable claim that ChiefsPlanet is representative of America at large.
Even partisan polling data is almost always (and possibly completely) well done and unbias. The games played isn't in the data itself... Dems want polling data to be accurate, no matter the numbers and Reps do too.

The trick is when they selectively release information (release favorable data and hold back unfavorable data) or skew the wording of the questions to elicit a desired response.

Didn't look at this poll, but it's pretty safe to say that the stats itself is reasonable, and if the questions are fairly worded then any bias is simply that they wouldn't release the numbers if they weren't favorable. That's more a factor of how they use the information, not a reflection of the quality of the information.

jAZ
03-24-2009, 09:47 AM
No... the Republican ticket lost because they didn't put a Republican on it.

What Repubilcan would have won the 2008 election? Looking back, I don't think anyone beats Obama in that election. But being hyper-partisan would make it worse, not better for the Republicans. Rudy, Mitt and McCain were your best shot.

jAZ
03-24-2009, 09:50 AM
Democrats began the year holding a six or seven point lead over the GOP for the first several weeks of 2009. Over the past month, the gap has been smaller, with Democrats holding a two-to-four point lead. It remains to be seen whether the current results reflect lasting change or statistical noise.

Separate Rasmussen polling released last week found that ratings for Congressional leaders of both parties have changed little over the past month and remain largely unfavorable.

Just 19% believe Congress has passed legislation to improve life in America over the past year.


http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/mood_of_america/congressional_ballot/generic_congressional_ballot


Keep it up boys!

This is where Rasmussen makes his money between elections. His process is sound. But he works the questions in such a way as to elicit the Con/Rep desired response. So his election polling is sound, but he's not a reliable source of issue polling between elections. And I'm not sure who (if anyone) is, to be honest.

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 09:53 AM
What Repubilcan would have won the 2008 election? Looking back, I don't think anyone beats Obama in that election. But being hyper-partisan would make it worse, not better for the Republicans. Rudy, Mitt and McCain were your best shot.

I think Ron Paul, had he had his party's support, would have wiped the floor with Obama.

HonestChieffan
03-24-2009, 10:26 AM
The republican party doesn't have to reach out for young voters. What will happen is young voters will get jobs and start paying taxes and realize that money is liberally getting stolen from them. Then their attitude will change.

There is some truth to that but....

The party, be it R or D, will always tend to move and flow from point to point on the scale of left to right. I believe there is a big gap currently between people who hold strongly to labels that they feel is really important to them and they try ever so hard to fit the party to their own brand of politics. So called conservatives have a hell of a time dealing with republicans who dont fit in their definition of conservative. And in the democratic party the same thing will occur over time.

In the case of the republicans, the party has been in the grips of the people who currently call themselves "conservative" and who apply their brand of conservatism to the label. Thats not to clear...basically conservative that we knew 20 yeras ago no longer exists and that group has moved far to the right...leaving a lot of people behind. In the democratic party the opposite is underway with a major move far to the left. Its like tides....as the republican party control by the new far right begins to subside, the democrats seem to be lurching rapidly to the left...in the process they will accomplish the samee result, that being to leave the more moderate centrist and conservative democrats behind. And as this occurs we will see the republican moderates regain some footing and give a place for the disaffected democrats to land.

DaKCMan AP
03-24-2009, 10:36 AM
you ought to have to be 25 years old to vote, and you should have to prove you worked full time for at least 75% of the past year.

Eh.

I don't want people running the country who have never provided for themselves or otherwise lived in the real world.

I want people voting who work for a living and provide for themselves.

I want people who look at a pay stub and notice the difference between gross and net.

I want people who do taxes and see how much money the federal government takes from them in a given year, and not just how much their refund is.

Most of all, I want people who are productive members of society running this country - producers, not consumers.


I've been working full-time, living on my own and 100% supporting myself since I was 21. But since I'm not 25 I shouldn't be able to vote? Well, then I shouldn't have to pay taxes or register for the selective service. The minimum age to serve in the military should be increased to 25 as well, then, yes?

jAZ
03-24-2009, 10:56 AM
I think Ron Paul, had he had his party's support, would have wiped the floor with Obama.

You live in a world where stay at home mom's don't deserve the right to vote because they don't pay income taxes. Your judgement is already in question.

Ron Paul was destroyed just within the Repubilcan party alone. Think about that. He couldn't muster a blip among Repubilcans.

Ron Paul supporters confuse the depth of their support for him with a breadth of support for him.

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 10:59 AM
There is some truth to that but....

The party, be it R or D, will always tend to move and flow from point to point on the scale of left to right. I believe there is a big gap currently between people who hold strongly to labels that they feel is really important to them and they try ever so hard to fit the party to their own brand of politics. So called conservatives have a hell of a time dealing with republicans who dont fit in their definition of conservative. And in the democratic party the same thing will occur over time.

In the case of the republicans, the party has been in the grips of the people who currently call themselves "conservative" and who apply their brand of conservatism to the label. Thats not to clear...basically conservative that we knew 20 yeras ago no longer exists and that group has moved far to the right...leaving a lot of people behind. In the democratic party the opposite is underway with a major move far to the left. Its like tides....as the republican party control by the new far right begins to subside, the democrats seem to be lurching rapidly to the left...in the process they will accomplish the samee result, that being to leave the more moderate centrist and conservative democrats behind. And as this occurs we will see the republican moderates regain some footing and give a place for the disaffected democrats to land.

A very good description of the political pendulum

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 11:03 AM
You live in a world where stay at home mom's don't deserve the right to vote because they don't pay income taxes. Your judgement is already in question.


Except stay at home moms do file income tax returns jointly. But you should keep that topic on the other thread.


In an honest economic debate Obama can't hang with Ron Paul, or most for that matter. And that's exactly what it would have come down to had he been able to get on the ticket in every state.

Ultra Peanut
03-24-2009, 11:17 AM
CONFIDENTIAL! FOR YOUR EYES!!!!! ONLY!!!!!!!!!!

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BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 02:00 PM
I think Ron Paul, had he had his party's support, would have wiped the floor with Obama.

Well, I definitely think he had a chance. His battle was tougher in the primary than in the general imo. See, so the Rs are to blame for all that's happening right now.

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 04:04 PM
I think it's telling that there hasn't been a single suggestion for what the Republican Party has done to reach out to young voters.

Very, very telling.

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 04:07 PM
Well, I definitely think he had a chance. His battle was tougher in the primary than in the general imo. See, so the Rs are to blame for all that's happening right now.

No doubt about that just about any which way you slice it.

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 04:08 PM
I think it's telling that there hasn't been a single suggestion for what the Republican Party has done to reach out to young voters.

Very, very telling.

Why should they change their platform or something just because it was ignored?

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 04:12 PM
Why should they change their platform or something just because it was ignored?

You think that's what Republicans have to do to reach out to young voters? Change their platform?

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 04:18 PM
You think that's what Republicans have to do to reach out to young voters? Change their platform?

No I don't think that. My point was they didn't govern as Republicans...and so they lost people, especially the young.

No one wants more socialism/communism....if that's what change meant by Obama. Apparently it is.

Garcia Bronco
03-24-2009, 04:27 PM
I didn't vote republican in the Federal elections last time because they didn't act like republicans and the VP candidate was off her rocker.

talastan
03-24-2009, 04:30 PM
Better question Direckshun, how does this type of post reflect your messiah's message of post-partisanship? If we say that we really want the BS from both parties to stop, studies and posts like these are completely stupid and reflect hypocrisy IMO. I'm okay for debate on issues like anyone else, but ending this type of pissing contest is the change that you and the other Obots supposedly voted for. Now some almost three months into it, you are back to the Dems are better or more relevant than Reps :BS: This hypocritic retoric is why third party memberships are going to start skyrocketing very soon.

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 04:32 PM
I didn't vote republican in the Federal elections last time because they didn't act like republicans and the VP candidate was off her rocker.
I didn't either.

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 04:40 PM
Better question Direckshun, how does this type of post reflect your messiah's message of post-partisanship? If we say that we really want the BS from both parties to stop, studies and posts like these are completely stupid and reflect hypocrisy IMO. I'm okay for debate on issues like anyone else, but ending this type of pissing contest is the change that you and the other Obots supposedly voted for. Now some almost three months into it, you are back to the Dems are better or more relevant than Reps :BS: This hypocritic retoric is why third party memberships are going to start skyrocketing very soon.

First thing's first, my Messiah roamed this earth two thousand years ago. He wasn't a government figure, and He had nothing to do with this.

But I continue to think it's hysterical you think this question, a valid question that has not received a single answer in this thread, is a mere pissing contest.

Everything else is off topic. I'll leave you to it.

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 04:41 PM
Hey, I just believe in laissez-faire is all. Be who are and act like it. Their ideas are good enough for all, if they don't abandon them.

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 04:43 PM
Hey, I just believe in laissez-faire is all. Be who are and act like it. Their ideas are good enough for all, if they don't abandon them.

I don't know how this answers the OP.

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 04:46 PM
I don't know how this answers the OP.

Did you ever think that it's the type of information that's just not readily available. No one knows. Or thinks it's important enough to know. The party is in a civil war right now for it's heart and soul. One thing at a time. Jeezaz!

SNR
03-24-2009, 05:12 PM
I don't know how this answers the OP.The OP got me confused. I still don't know WTF young people want. Funny how that works in politics.

If you ask a majority of Americans the question, "Do you wish the economy were better regulated" they would probably say "yes." Because you just used empty terms. WTF DOES THAT MEAN?

"Do you believe the Republicans care about your interests, young person?" Considering the party lost a major election recently, if I were that young person, I would probably say, uh, well.... "NO!"

You don't know. I don't know. And the polling didn't specify, so IT doesn't know either. So go ahead and act like your views are groovy and jivey and are the way to go. I never thought the way the Republicans were going since 2001 was any good, but I especially don't believe that now. But I sure as hell don't think the Democrats have a young person's interest at heart, either, and your little poll doesn't tell jack shit one way or the other.

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 06:46 PM
The OP got me confused. I still don't know WTF young people want. Funny how that works in politics.

If you ask a majority of Americans the question, "Do you wish the economy were better regulated" they would probably say "yes." Because you just used empty terms. WTF DOES THAT MEAN?

"Do you believe the Republicans care about your interests, young person?" Considering the party lost a major election recently, if I were that young person, I would probably say, uh, well.... "NO!"

You don't know. I don't know. And the polling didn't specify, so IT doesn't know either. So go ahead and act like your views are groovy and jivey and are the way to go. I never thought the way the Republicans were going since 2001 was any good, but I especially don't believe that now. But I sure as hell don't think the Democrats have a young person's interest at heart, either, and your little poll doesn't tell jack shit one way or the other.
What is the Republican Party doing to reach out to young voters?

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 06:54 PM
What is the Republican Party doing to reach out to young voters?

Shouldn't you be calling the official head of the GOP to ask?
It's called asking the wrong source.

Direckshun
03-24-2009, 06:54 PM
Shouldn't you be calling the official head of the GOP to ask?
It's called asking the wrong source.

ROFL

BucEyedPea
03-24-2009, 06:56 PM
ROFL

So you laugh at logic too? Says all. You got nuthin'.
That's where you'll probably get an answer if you really want to know.
You don't really want to know. You wanted to post how the GOP is irrelevant. The same way the Rs said of the Ds in the 90's.

SNR
03-25-2009, 01:02 AM
What is the Republican Party doing to reach out to young voters?They're giving them free candy and banning parents from groundings as punishment.

What are the Democrats doing?

SNR
03-25-2009, 01:13 AM
Here Direckshun. Check out the website. It looks pretty hip and funk and young and stupid and whack and fresh, yo.

http://www.gop.com/

Go find your answer.

Have fun.

DeezNutz
03-25-2009, 01:16 AM
Buying time slots on MSNBC to get a foot in the door amongst the hard-hitting analysis? Wooooooorrrrsssttt persssooooon in the wooooooorrrrld.

Funky fresh.

SNR
03-25-2009, 01:24 AM
Nothing says "young" and "cool" like a cigar

http://www.georgewbushstore.com/home.htm

Velvet_Jones
03-25-2009, 01:34 AM
Get off my ****ing lawn Direckshun. You are overstating your importance. You own nothing - but maybe a student loan - and the inability to shut the **** up.

I can almost guarantee that you have not paid any taxes in your limited adult life. Me on the other hand have paid a minimum of 27k for the last ten years. This year is a record - 36k to fund your right to be stupid.

Oh - and get off my lawn you stupid dick-head. Or did I say that earlier.