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View Full Version : News Anyone else watch 60Minutes about the Conficker Worm?


Kerberos
03-30-2009, 09:18 AM
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/03/27/60minutes/main4897053.shtml

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Don't know about everyone else but to ME this sounds like a HUGE problem waiting to happen.

Otter
03-30-2009, 09:34 AM
I didn't see the 60 Minutes segment but I've read quiet a bit on the worm on how it's evolving. It's both amazing and scary how the writers of this have basically used modern techniques used by Microsoft and every other software developer to allow the code to continue to evolve.

This wasn't written by some 17 year old kid in his basement. These people knew what they were doing x10. Going by the code April 1st is the next day it's due to patch/update itself.

I work as wireless network admin and wear another hat as a system admin for mostly UNIX based apps so there's not much I can do except join the interns during down time to find the non-automated PCs and check for full updates.

Should be interesting. Microsoft has a bounty out for the writers which should motivate some people to help track them them down.

On April 1st, 2009 - Skynet *cough*, excuse me, Conficker became self-aware...:D

Guru
03-30-2009, 09:41 AM
I watched that too. I have to admit, it does concern me.

Gonzo
03-30-2009, 09:42 AM
This is one of the biggest reasons I never do any banking online.

Kerberos
03-30-2009, 09:46 AM
This is one of the biggest reasons I never do any banking online.

The wife closed accounts on Amazon and other places she does ordering from online and from now on we will just fill things out as we need to.

I set both of our computers to delete form data as that is what they are looking for IIRC?

Huge pain in the ass but it beats the alternative.

Buehler445
03-30-2009, 09:57 AM
My dad saw it and gave me the doom and gloom.

I do have a question for you guys though. (Please excuse the following, it came from my dad and he is pretty clueless with computers) but Dad said that the worm is used to look at what you are seeing on your screen (I don't know if that is it, but some sort of data being passed to the creator about your financial data). So then when you complete activities on your screen, they can "see" it and keep your info.

Well, my question is that whatever data they are getting has to be sent somewhere, right? Is there, then, a way to see where the data was sent? That would in turn point at least to a direction of where the culprit is? If it is that big of a deal, I'd anticipate somebody working on figuring out who it is.

:shrug: all that info came from my dad, so it may be way off base.
Posted via Mobile Device

Demonpenz
03-30-2009, 10:02 AM
My dad saw it and gave me the doom and gloom.

I do have a question for you guys though. (Please excuse the following, it came from my dad and he is pretty clueless with computers) but Dad said that the worm is used to look at what you are seeing on your screen (I don't know if that is it, but some sort of data being passed to the creator about your financial data). So then when you complete activities on your screen, they can "see" it and keep your info.

Well, my question is that whatever data they are getting has to be sent somewhere, right? Is there, then, a way to see where the data was sent? That would in turn point at least to a direction of where the culprit is? If it is that big of a deal, I'd anticipate somebody working on figuring out who it is.

:shrug: all that info came from my dad, so it may be way off base.
Posted via Mobile Device


The problem comes in when they have to unlock the encription which can take days. It is 199 over 200 encryption which is nearly impossible to unlock. That is why we are going to get Hugh Jackman with an earing with holly barry's boobies to fix it

phisherman
03-30-2009, 10:05 AM
My dad saw it and gave me the doom and gloom.

I do have a question for you guys though. (Please excuse the following, it came from my dad and he is pretty clueless with computers) but Dad said that the worm is used to look at what you are seeing on your screen (I don't know if that is it, but some sort of data being passed to the creator about your financial data). So then when you complete activities on your screen, they can "see" it and keep your info.

Well, my question is that whatever data they are getting has to be sent somewhere, right? Is there, then, a way to see where the data was sent? That would in turn point at least to a direction of where the culprit is? If it is that big of a deal, I'd anticipate somebody working on figuring out who it is.

:shrug: all that info came from my dad, so it may be way off base.
Posted via Mobile Device

it's got a keystroke logger. this is how they know where you're going.

whatever you type, goes into a text file that they can see.

Fish
03-30-2009, 10:09 AM
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/ms08-067.mspx

ANSWERS TO COMMON QUESTIONS

Q: What will happen on April 1, 2009?
A: Based on our collective technical analysis, we've determined that systems infected with the latest version of Conficker will begin to use a new algorithm to determine what domains to contact. We have not identified any other actions scheduled to take place on April 1, 2009.

Q: Will an updated version of Conficker go out to already-infected systems on April 1, 2009?
A: It is possible that systems with the latest version of Conficker will be updated with a newer version of Conficker on April 1, 2009 by contacting domains on the new domain list. However, these systems could be updated on any date before or after April 1, 2009 as well using the "peer- to-peer" updating channel in the latest version of Conficker.

Q: Should the general public be alarmed? Why or why not?
A: No, the general public should not be alarmed. Most home users have been protected by Microsoft Security Update MS08-067 (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/ms08-067.mspx) being applied automatically.

Q: What should people who are worried about April 1, 2009 and Conficker do?
A: We recommend that home users who have not yet enabled automatic updates do so and ensure their security software is up to date with the latest antivirus signatures for Windows Live OneCare, or the antivirus product they use. We recommend that enterprise customers continue to focus on the guidance from Microsoft and take multiple measures to minimize the risk of getting infected:

• Fully Install MS08-067 (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/ms08-067.mspx) on all Windows computers in your environment. Because 100 percent deployment can be challenging in diverse enterprises, the next defense-in-depth steps can help minimize the risk too.
• Use an antivirus product that has solid detection of Conficker. Such an antivirus program should be able to block the worm from copying itself to other machines. For example, Microsoft Forefront Client Security and Windows Live OneCare can detect and block this worm from the very first day of its discovery.
• Use strong passwords both for any user account and also for any file share in your environment.
• Make sure to use only AutoPlay options that you are familiar with as other options may have been added by malicious software. Some customers may prefer to disable the AutoRun functionality altogether.
• Evaluate additional security best practices in accordance with their organization's policies and procedures.

Otter
03-30-2009, 10:09 AM
The problem comes in when they have to unlock the encription which can take days. It is 199 over 200 encryption which is nearly impossible to unlock. That is why we are going to get Hugh Jackman with an earing with holly barry's boobies to fix it

The reason the people working on this are having such a hard time tracking where the worm is getting it's updates from:

-- it cleverly creates thousands of false domains daily to throw off investigators. On the update day, it selects 500 correct domains out of the 50,000 candidates to download malware and updates from.

Just to relate on why they can't just track down the hosts easily.

Buehler445
03-30-2009, 10:10 AM
it's got a keystroke logger. this is how they know where you're going.

whatever you type, goes into a text file that they can see.

That makes more sense. I didn't figure it was actually viewing what is on your screen. So the text file stays on your computer and they just have access to view it?
Posted via Mobile Device

Molitoth
03-30-2009, 10:10 AM
I watched 60 minutes about it. Pretty scary.

Those bastards also need to stop poisoning African Lions. =/

And Lebron James is a maniac.

Kerberos
03-30-2009, 10:16 AM
And Lebron James is a maniac.

He was amazing in that interview with his full court TOSS that was ALL NET.

And the SOB is only 24? He may be better than MJ by the time he is done?

PastorMikH
03-30-2009, 10:17 AM
So, if the russian kids can get away with hacking our systems, how come we don't have people infecting their systems with stuff that fries their HDs?

Molitoth
03-30-2009, 10:18 AM
He was amazing in that interview with his full court TOSS that was ALL NET.

And the SOB is only 24? He may be better than MJ by the time he is done?

You can be better or worse in many areas, for example:

James better stats then MJ? for sure if he stays healthy.
James better performer in "clutch" situations then MJ? we will have to wait and see. (Kobe is close, imo)

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 10:19 AM
The wife closed accounts on Amazon and other places she does ordering from online and from now on we will just fill things out as we need to.

I set both of our computers to delete form data as that is what they are looking for IIRC?

Huge pain in the ass but it beats the alternative.

Just get LifeLock or something similar.

Closing accounts is awfully extreme.

Molitoth
03-30-2009, 10:19 AM
Ya that 14 year old Russian freak named Tempest is a smart little shit.

InChiefsHell
03-30-2009, 10:19 AM
Geez. These people (hackers) suck...get a friggin' life!

Lzen
03-30-2009, 10:22 AM
I tend to wonder what that woman had on her computers? Was she using a quality AV and spyware detection software? Or was it junk? Little scary, but that is the way of the world nowadays.

Molitoth
03-30-2009, 10:25 AM
Geez. These people (hackers) suck...get a friggin' life!

Anyone think these companies pay these little shits to implement these viruses so that the corporations can make a shit ton of money off of "fixes?"

Fish
03-30-2009, 10:26 AM
My dad saw it and gave me the doom and gloom.

I do have a question for you guys though. (Please excuse the following, it came from my dad and he is pretty clueless with computers) but Dad said that the worm is used to look at what you are seeing on your screen (I don't know if that is it, but some sort of data being passed to the creator about your financial data). So then when you complete activities on your screen, they can "see" it and keep your info.

Well, my question is that whatever data they are getting has to be sent somewhere, right? Is there, then, a way to see where the data was sent? That would in turn point at least to a direction of where the culprit is? If it is that big of a deal, I'd anticipate somebody working on figuring out who it is.

:shrug: all that info came from my dad, so it may be way off base.
Posted via Mobile Device

The worm has a keylogger. Which means it records everything that is typed and saves that info and tries to send that info back to the hacker. That doesn't always happen for a number of reasons. The odds of a keylogger actually logging any info, and successfully sending that info to someone for use in identity theft is very very low.

The media is of course doing a little fear mongering with this. The threat is real, but people shouldn't feel the need to turn their machines off, or change their computer behaviors. Just make sure Automatic updates is working and that Windows is all up-to-date. http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/ Make sure you have a decent virus scanner and that it's working and updating. If you notice that Windows Update won't run or update, or your virus scanner won't run or won't update, then you might have problems.

The thing about this worm, is that it hasn't done anything yet. It's just sitting there on lots of machines waiting. And it's likely that it will be completely isolated before it has a chance to do anything harmful.

And no, it's not quite as easy as just looking to see where the data is being sent. It doesn't quite work like that.

Lzen
03-30-2009, 10:27 AM
Anyone think these companies pay these little shits to implement these viruses so that the corporations can make a shit ton of money off of "fixes?"

I have always considered that collusion could be a possibility. Just something to think about. Of course, there is no proof of that. So who knows for sure?

dirk digler
03-30-2009, 10:28 AM
The worm has a keylogger. Which means it records everything that is typed and saves that info and tries to send that info back to the hacker. That doesn't always happen for a number of reasons. The odds of a keylogger actually logging any info, and successfully sending that info to someone for use in identity theft is very very low.

The media is of course doing a little fear mongering with this. The threat is real, but people shouldn't feel the need to turn their machines off, or change their computer behaviors. Just make sure Automatic updates is working and that Windows is all up-to-date. http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/ Make sure you have a decent virus scanner and that it's working and updating. If you notice that Windows Update won't run or update, or your virus scanner won't run or won't update, then you might have problems.

The thing about this worm, is that it hasn't done anything yet. It's just sitting there on lots of machines waiting. And it's likely that it will be completely isolated before it has a chance to do anything harmful.

And no, it's not quite as easy as just looking to see where the data is being sent. It doesn't quite work like that.

Good advice KC Fish.

Also here is the direct link to patch your system if you need a quick fix

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/Bulletin/MS08-067.mspx

phisherman
03-30-2009, 10:28 AM
That makes more sense. I didn't figure it was actually viewing what is on your screen. So the text file stays on your computer and they just have access to view it?
Posted via Mobile Device

the keystroke logger is probably uploading your keystrokes to a text file on the hacker's machine.

i'm not too sure, my exposure to using a keystroke logger in this way is pretty limited, though this is how they typically work, at least the ones that i've been exposed to.

Lzen
03-30-2009, 10:30 AM
The worm has a keylogger. Which means it records everything that is typed and saves that info and tries to send that info back to the hacker. That doesn't always happen for a number of reasons. The odds of a keylogger actually logging any info, and successfully sending that info to someone for use in identity theft is very very low.

The media is of course doing a little fear mongering with this. The threat is real, but people shouldn't feel the need to turn their machines off, or change their computer behaviors. Just make sure Automatic updates is working and that Windows is all up-to-date. http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/ Make sure you have a decent virus scanner and that it's working and updating. If you notice that Windows Update won't run or update, or your virus scanner won't run or won't update, then you might have problems.

The thing about this worm, is that it hasn't done anything yet. It's just sitting there on lots of machines waiting. And it's likely that it will be completely isolated before it has a chance to do anything harmful.

And no, it's not quite as easy as just looking to see where the data is being sent. It doesn't quite work like that.

Fear mongering is kinda what I told the wife when this piece first came on last night. Then I changed the channel. :)

BTW, what virus scanner would you recommend?

Buck
03-30-2009, 10:30 AM
Wait, so do I need to not do any online banking or ordering from amazon in the next few days?

bowener
03-30-2009, 10:31 AM
I watched it. Seems like this could be a problem, or hopefully a big April fool's spam joke. Probably going to be something really bad though....

Mr. Krab
03-30-2009, 10:33 AM
On April 1st, 2009 - Skynet *cough*, excuse me, Conficker became self-aware...:D
That's not funny. Ok, so it's a little bit funny, but also pretty scary. :(

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 10:37 AM
I watched it. Seems like this could be a problem, or hopefully a big April fool's spam joke. Probably going to be something really bad though....

Most of these things end up being far more hyped than damaging.

Buehler445
03-30-2009, 10:37 AM
The worm has a keylogger. Which means it records everything that is typed and saves that info and tries to send that info back to the hacker. That doesn't always happen for a number of reasons. The odds of a keylogger actually logging any info, and successfully sending that info to someone for use in identity theft is very very low.

The media is of course doing a little fear mongering with this. The threat is real, but people shouldn't feel the need to turn their machines off, or change their computer behaviors. Just make sure Automatic updates is working and that Windows is all up-to-date. http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/ Make sure you have a decent virus scanner and that it's working and updating. If you notice that Windows Update won't run or update, or your virus scanner won't run or won't update, then you might have problems.

The thing about this worm, is that it hasn't done anything yet. It's just sitting there on lots of machines waiting. And it's likely that it will be completely isolated before it has a chance to do anything harmful.

And no, it's not quite as easy as just looking to see where the data is being sent. It doesn't quite work like that.

I figured that was the case. Like I said, that info came from my dad.

Thx.
Posted via Mobile Device

Fish
03-30-2009, 10:37 AM
the keystroke logger is probably uploading your keystrokes to a text file on the hacker's machine.

i'm not too sure, my exposure to using a keystroke logger in this way is pretty limited, though this is how they typically work, at least the ones that i've been exposed to.

Keystroke loggers normally log keystrokes and save them them to a file on the infected user's local computer. It will normally log keys for a set time period, and then after that time period is up, it will try to send the log file to a different location on the internet that is accessible to the "hacker". Generally it doesn't go directly to the hacker's machine.

But keyloggers very rarely work. Normally a machine would have to have it's AV and/or spyware or malware protection completely disabled or spoofed in order to run a keylogger. Your machine would have to already be seriously compromised to get a keylogger successfully working on it. If your computer is susceptable to a keylogger program, you're already way screwed....

Frazod
03-30-2009, 10:40 AM
I saw the story last night. Scary stuff. And it enfuriates me that those little bastards are so brazen about it and no one does anything to stop them. You'd think one of these companies could hire some ex-KGB goon to blow up a nearly car the next time they pose for a group picture in the middle of the street.

Fish
03-30-2009, 10:40 AM
Fear mongering is kinda what I told the wife when this piece first came on last night. Then I changed the channel. :)

BTW, what virus scanner would you recommend?

I would recommend Avast for the general home user. Microsoft Forefront in a corporate environment.

dirk digler
03-30-2009, 10:42 AM
What I found most funny about the 60 minutes piece was they actually used Symantec as some kind of legitimate anti-virus product. LMAO

Anyone who uses them deserves what they get.

Otter
03-30-2009, 10:44 AM
I would recommend Avast for the general home user. Microsoft Forefront in a corporate environment.

I second this statement...Avast is great for single home user.

Saulbadguy
03-30-2009, 10:46 AM
This is one of the biggest reasons I never do any banking online.

ROFL

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 10:47 AM
I've mentioned this before, but Avast has gotten awards from a couple of CSO-oriented magazines, meaning that it's GOOD ENOUGH to win awards as a corporate product, but is completely free for home users. The only way I'd ever use something else is if they stopped updating it.

BigRedChief
03-30-2009, 10:47 AM
the aveage home user with a firewall and a good anti-virus suite should be fine. These scripts and russian gang attacks are a common place occurance they just don't usually make 60 mintues.

Saulbadguy
03-30-2009, 10:49 AM
What angers me most about this is our users watching 60 minutes and then coming in to spam my inbox asking me if we are protected.

Mr. Plow
03-30-2009, 10:49 AM
Man - that video caused a little concern in me.

Mr. Plow
03-30-2009, 10:50 AM
Closing accounts is awfully extreme.


That is what I thought.

BigMeatballDave
03-30-2009, 10:50 AM
I second this statement...Avast is great for single home user.Good, this is what I use.

Fish
03-30-2009, 10:51 AM
What angers me most about this is our users watching 60 minutes and then coming in to spam my inbox asking me if we are protected.

:thumb:

Been dealing with this as well.... A few crazy users are scared shitless Y2K style....

BigMeatballDave
03-30-2009, 10:55 AM
This is one of the biggest reasons I never do any banking online.Chicken little?

Demonpenz
03-30-2009, 10:56 AM
just got this in my hotmail

FAQ

Will this Virus effect my nacho eating?
No with a solid AntiVirus and being smart about what attatchments you open, you should be fine eating all the nacho's you want

what if I have a background of chad Krogger of nickleback?
You will be beaten with a wiffle ball bat if I see the background, if not then you should be fine.
What about the porn man...the PORN
All porn should be just fine, your cincinatti bowties, doggy style cleveland steamers, dairy creamers, Thigpen Inny, Grbac outtie, reverse cowgirl Maslowski Snatch, Helser Jason belser reverse crab, all this types of porn positions should be fine

Pants
03-30-2009, 11:02 AM
i r login ur strok3z now

Kerberos
03-30-2009, 11:39 AM
Just get LifeLock or something similar.

Closing accounts is awfully extreme.

EXTREME? Yes

But didn't they say that this thing was targeting mostly corporations and big business?

I don't need my information and credit cards out there for these ****ers to get a hold of because someone at a place I order from online underestimates things.

IMO better safe than sorry.

Stanley Nickels
03-30-2009, 12:02 PM
Not to be "that guy", but Mac's aren't affected by this virus.
Or most malware, spyware or adware.
Or viruses (except Trojans)
Nor can they get infected with Windows Vista.

Frazod
03-30-2009, 12:04 PM
I've been thinking about getting Life Lock. I hate to add another monthly bill, but Christ, seems like there's some dirtbag waiting to ruin your shit around every corner or website, and I know from experience the cops don't give a shit about catching the people who do it, assuming they're even in this country.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 12:10 PM
EXTREME? Yes

But didn't they say that this thing was targeting mostly corporations and big business?

I don't need my information and credit cards out there for these ****ers to get a hold of because someone at a place I order from online underestimates things.

IMO better safe than sorry.

The thing is, if you USE a credit card online you can be potentially compromised at the time of the transaction. Having accounts sitting out there on Amazon, etc. doesn't create that much more exposure.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 12:11 PM
I've been thinking about getting Life Lock. I hate to add another monthly bill, but Christ, seems like there's some dirtbag waiting to ruin your shit around every corner or website, and I know from experience the cops don't give a shit about catching the people who do it, assuming they're even in this country.

The FBI actually does give a shit about catching the people that do it, but because so many of them are outside of the US, they're largely helpless to deal with it. It's nearly impossible to get some of these guys because a large percentage of them are in the former Soviet Union.

88TG88
03-30-2009, 12:18 PM
Not to be "that guy", but Mac's aren't affected by this virus.
Or most malware, spyware or adware.
Or viruses (except Trojans)
Nor can they get infected with Windows Vista.

I don't miss my PC at all.

Fish
03-30-2009, 12:21 PM
EXTREME? Yes

But didn't they say that this thing was targeting mostly corporations and big business?

I don't need my information and credit cards out there for these ****ers to get a hold of because someone at a place I order from online underestimates things.

IMO better safe than sorry.

I know they said this is targeting corporations and businesses, but in no way should that cause you not to trust corporations and businesses you normally deal with. That simply means that Joe Blow from Insignificant Corp. Inc. down the street is probably typing on a machine that isn't updated and patched as consistently as most users' home machines.

Saying that worms "target" certain machines is poor wording. Worms will find machines with poor security infrastructures. The worms don't care, they'll install themselves on any machine it can. Corporations and big businesses just happen to fit that description in most cases. But the corporations and businesses they're talking about aren't the ones you're conducting secure online transactions with. I wouldn't worry about a corporation you might be ordering from simply because they are a corporation. Any worthy business that conducts routine online transactions is going to be patched already.

Kerberos
03-30-2009, 12:23 PM
The FBI actually does give a shit about catching the people that do it, but because so many of them are outside of the US, they're largely helpless to deal with it. It's nearly impossible to get some of these guys because a large percentage of them are in the former Soviet Union.

And from watching 60 minutes those same people (KIDS) are being applauded and given notoriety, (for being hackers that take money from stupid westerners), by law enforcement in that former Soviet Union.

suds79
03-30-2009, 12:24 PM
Okay did anybody find it kinda funny how the 60 minutes reporter was totally clueless? lol.

Was this the 1st time she was on a PC?

"What? You mean with this virus they can track what I do?"... This just in. Virus are dangerous and you need to protect your identity.

Welcome to the past :thumb:

Kerberos
03-30-2009, 12:26 PM
Okay did anybody find it kinda funny how the 60 minutes reporter was totally clueless? lol.

Was this the 1st time she was on a PC?

"What? You mean with this virus they can track what I do?"... This just in. Virus are dangerous and you need to protect your identity.

Welcome to the past :thumb:

I found it disturbing that CBS found the conficker worm in thier own network and they don't know if they have it completely secure.

vailpass
03-30-2009, 12:34 PM
Not to be "that guy", but Mac's aren't affected by this virus.
Or most malware, spyware or adware.
Or viruses (except Trojans)
Nor can they get infected with Windows Vista.

Not applicable to the business world. But if I ever want to draw a picture or play a song on an overpriced hippie box I'll keep this in mind.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 12:35 PM
And from watching 60 minutes those same people (KIDS) are being applauded and given notoriety, (for being hackers that take money from stupid westerners), by law enforcement in that former Soviet Union.

Not only are they being applauded, in some cases they're being EMPLOYED, by corrupt governments...

Fish
03-30-2009, 12:35 PM
And from watching 60 minutes those same people (KIDS) are being applauded and given notoriety, (for being hackers that take money from stupid westerners), by law enforcement in that former Soviet Union.

I understand the frustration with hackers. But at the same time, they do serve a purpose. Some of the most important security flaws are discovered and patched in this way. Hackers, in effect, keep the security firms on top of new technology. It's hard to justify sometimes. But usually a hacker motivated by mischief is more successful at exposing security risks than a security corp motivated by money. It's a necessary evil....

Stanley Nickels
03-30-2009, 12:48 PM
Not applicable to the business world. But if I ever want to draw a picture or play a song on an overpriced hippie box I'll keep this in mind.


Mac's OS market share has risen 50% in two years.
It's units are the highest selling brand of PCs in the world.
It's the only computer manufacturer to post profits each of the last 8 quarters
Its business share has doubled in the past three years.
It's SMALL business share has quadrupled in the past five.

But keep that nonchalant, ignorant mentality. It's what got Mac to where it is now.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 12:56 PM
Mac's OS market share has risen 50% in two years.
It's units are the highest selling brand of PCs in the world.
It's the only computer manufacturer to post profits each of the last 8 quarters
Its business share has doubled in the past three years.
It's SMALL business share has quadrupled in the past five.

But keep that nonchalant, ignorant mentality. It's what got Mac to where it is now.

Just where is Mac now? They still operate a closed OS only now they do it on a cheaper and inferior hardware platform. Or maybe you're talking about the Mac that makes over-hyped, over-priced, poorly-made consumer electronics.

It's pretty simple - Mac got to where they are today by sacrificing some of their core strengths.

KCtotheSB
03-30-2009, 01:05 PM
I absolutely HATE hackers and the individuals who make these goddamn things. I always imagine these losers as the kids in high school who got their asses kicked for being book smart and this is their way of taking revenge on society. Or lowlife douchebags with no jobs who think it's cool to swipe other peoples information and brag about it.

I dunno, it just pisses me off and I wish there was someone/something I could punch. Guess my wife will do for now.....

vailpass
03-30-2009, 01:06 PM
Mac's OS market share has risen 50% in two years.
It's units are the highest selling brand of PCs in the world.
It's the only computer manufacturer to post profits each of the last 8 quarters
Its business share has doubled in the past three years.
It's SMALL business share has quadrupled in the past five.

But keep that nonchalant, ignorant mentality. It's what got Mac to where it is now.

Risen 50%? What is 50% of nothing?
And there are still ZERO entities with whom I do business that use macs or whose secured networks support macs.
But keep on drawing your pictures and listening to your music on that overpriced closed-system box of yours.
:Peace:

Frazod
03-30-2009, 01:07 PM
The FBI actually does give a shit about catching the people that do it, but because so many of them are outside of the US, they're largely helpless to deal with it. It's nearly impossible to get some of these guys because a large percentage of them are in the former Soviet Union.

That certainly wasn't my experience. Of course, I wasn't dealing with the FBI, just my police department and the police department in the city where the thief was. Both told me to call the other one and neither one did a goddamn thing.

And the guy wasn't in bum fuck Siberia, either - he was in central Florida.

Guru
03-30-2009, 01:24 PM
What I found most funny about the 60 minutes piece was they actually used Symantec as some kind of legitimate anti-virus product. LMAO

Anyone who uses them deserves what they get.I found that part of the interview hilarious. Symantec isn't worth shit!!! It used to be a great product until about 2000 then it just went to crap.

Stanley Nickels
03-30-2009, 01:33 PM
Risen 50%? What is 50% of nothing?
And there are still ZERO entities with whom I do business that use macs or whose secured networks support macs.
But keep on drawing your pictures and listening to your music on that overpriced closed-system box of yours.
:Peace:

If by "drawing [my] pictures and listening to [my] music" you mean programming and coding, I'll go back to that.

If, however, you mean to insinuate that I'm a hippy who bought an overly priced computer (which are sorta two antithetical ideas if you think about it), I think you've got another thing coming.

And to htismaque, just what do you think they've sacrificed? Please enlighten me. Because I think that even now you can compare the shelf lives of Macs and PCs and come up with evidence that supports my claim.
It's called the Total Life Cycle Cost. Give it a look.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 02:04 PM
I absolutely HATE hackers and the individuals who make these goddamn things. I always imagine these losers as the kids in high school who got their asses kicked for being book smart and this is their way of taking revenge on society. Or lowlife douchebags with no jobs who think it's cool to swipe other peoples information and brag about it.

I dunno, it just pisses me off and I wish there was someone/something I could punch. Guess my wife will do for now.....

You're talking about script kiddies, which account for about 80% of all problems on the Internet. They're also virtually HARMLESS.

Real hackers are usual hardened criminals, highly-skilled and highly-paid.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 02:06 PM
And to htismaque, just what do you think they've sacrificed? Please enlighten me. Because I think that even now you can compare the shelf lives of Macs and PCs and come up with evidence that supports my claim.
It's called the Total Life Cycle Cost. Give it a look.

They "acquired" most of the issues with hardware and driver compatibility the minute they started using PC processors. They sacrificed a high-quality closed computing environment in an attempt to bring down prices and appeal to the masses. To their credit, it's working. But in the process, they eliminated the reason why *I* would look at buying a Mac. I can get PC hardware and run Linux on it for a fraction of the cost of a Mac.

Motorola >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Intel

Fish
03-30-2009, 03:45 PM
They "acquired" most of the issues with hardware and driver compatibility the minute they started using PC processors. They sacrificed a high-quality closed computing environment in an attempt to bring down prices and appeal to the masses. To their credit, it's working. But in the process, they eliminated the reason why *I* would look at buying a Mac. I can get PC hardware and run Linux on it for a fraction of the cost of a Mac.

Motorola >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Intel

I wouldn't exactly say their current hardware is of lesser quality than when they were using PowerPC chips. And they're still using the same fabrication processes other than the chipset. Being an Apple Authorized Service Provider, I haven't noticed any increase in hardware failures since Apple went Intel. Actually it's been the opposite so far in my experience. The new logic boards and typical components have lower fail rates so far. They aren't without criticism, but Apple's quality control remains very high. And you can't underestimate what they did in switching to Intel. A change that dramatic isn't easy to pull off. Their conversion had higher than expected results. And the only thing they really sacrificed is PowerPC only Classic compatibility. Which needed to die anyway. They removed the Firewire 400 ports on their newest lines, which was a huge mistake IMO, but they have removed little else across the board.

And they still retain a high quality closed computing environment. They've just added the optional alternative as well. Of course you can get PC hardware and run Linux for much cheaper if that's all you need. But Macs can provide much more than just that functionality. Some of which is well worth the price to many people.

vailpass
03-30-2009, 05:51 PM
If by "drawing [my] pictures and listening to [my] music" you mean programming and coding, I'll go back to that.

If, however, you mean to insinuate that I'm a hippy who bought an overly priced computer (which are sorta two antithetical ideas if you think about it), I think you've got another thing coming.

And to htismaque, just what do you think they've sacrificed? Please enlighten me. Because I think that even now you can compare the shelf lives of Macs and PCs and come up with evidence that supports my claim.
It's called the Total Life Cycle Cost. Give it a look.

LOL at Passionate Apple Guy

Stanley Nickels
03-30-2009, 05:58 PM
LOL at Passionate Apple Guy

I'm LOLing at how much business has come my way in the past three years while people like you LOL at passionate Apple guys.

You're nothing but a troll on this subject at this point, so I'm really not going to respond to anything else you write.

htismaqe
03-30-2009, 06:06 PM
And they still retain a high quality closed computing environment. They've just added the optional alternative as well. Of course you can get PC hardware and run Linux for much cheaper if that's all you need. But Macs can provide much more than just that functionality. Some of which is well worth the price to many people.

Macs actually used to be a viable mid-range alternative to full-blown UNIX boxes. I used to run Network Monitoring on a PowerPC. They're now just another consumer PC, IMO.

Psyko Tek
03-30-2009, 06:41 PM
never bought a consumer PC
always built my own

alanm
03-30-2009, 07:33 PM
I watched it. Seems like this could be a problem, or hopefully a big April fool's spam joke. Probably going to be something really bad though....Probably more in line with the Millennium scare.