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jaa1025
04-28-2009, 11:49 PM
I'm supposed to go to cancun in 3 days....first, it was the drug cartel than had people concerned that we're coming with me and now this. I'm doing my best to explain that while yes, it would suck to get "swine flu" it would not be the end of the world. Considering 36,000 people die in the US EVERY YEAR from REGULAR flu, then 26 CONFIRMED deaths out of 2000 plus reported infected isn't something to worry about. Not to mention the likely thousands that have been infected but not reported because they thought it was a regular flu/cold.

Anyways, I don't understand the big worry...and it irritates me that the media is making this sounds like there are bodies of people lying along the streets of Mexico from this plague like flu.

1) There is a treatment medicine...4 to be exact.

2) Out of 109 Million people in Mexico, 2000+ have been reported. Those are lottery type odds that we won't get it.

3) The people that died, most likely did NOT have health care and it was MEXICO health care at best if they did. The most likely did not have health care opinion was based on an article I read from mexico city that said it attacked the "slums" of mexico the worst because they couldn't afford treatment.

4) I'm just damn trying to go to mexico to find a nice little senorita or two...and it's messing my plans up damnit.


So, should I go or not? Oh...one concern that my friend had is if they "close the borders"...what happens if we are in Mexico and the US decides to halt all travel to and from Mexico? Would they let us return or do we have to wait it out down there?

DaneMcCloud
04-28-2009, 11:51 PM
Natural Selection, Fuqtard.

Natural Selection.

Pants
04-28-2009, 11:59 PM
Antibiotics do nothing against viruses. There's one decent antiviral readily available - Tamiflu and it's so so as far as efficacy goes.

Frazod
04-29-2009, 12:01 AM
Just like everything else, it is overblown by the media. As long as the populace is scared to fucking death, they're watching the news.

Hopefully all the reporters that go to Mexico City will lick the handrails at the airport and drink the water.

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:02 AM
Dont go to Mexico. Now is not a good time. This is serious, and not "overblown" by the media.

L.A. Chieffan
04-29-2009, 12:03 AM
i dont know anybody thats got it, and i knows lots of people man

DaneMcCloud
04-29-2009, 12:05 AM
Just like everything else, it is overblown by the media. As long as the populace is scared to fucking death, they're watching the news.

Hopefully all the reporters that go to Mexico City will lick the handrails at the airport and drink the water.

Dude, we canceled our trip on Friday (were supposed to go Monday-Monday).

I have an infant and there's no way I'm chancing that shit. One of my best friends is a doctor and she offered to load us up on Tamiflu but it's just not worth it.

It's killed 149 peeps in Mexico and they expect that number to rise. That doesn't sound like much but I'll tell you what, Bro:

I don't want my daughter to be 150.

Guru
04-29-2009, 12:06 AM
And JOBU knows!!!!

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:06 AM
i dont know anybody thats got it, and i knows lots of people man

There are only a few confirmed cases in California. New York has it the worst right now. America is fine right now. But when nearly 200 people have died now in Mexico because of this flu its is certainly not overblown.

Pants
04-29-2009, 12:07 AM
Dude, we canceled our trip on Friday (were supposed to go Monday-Monday).

I have an infant and there's no way I'm chancing that shit. One of my best friends is a doctor and she offered to load us up on Tamiflu but it's just not worth it.

It's killed 149 peeps in Mexico and they expect that number to rise. That doesn't sound like much but I'll tell you what, Bro:

I don't want my daughter to be 150.

Yeah, but to be fair, the everyday flu can kill infants as well.

DaneMcCloud
04-29-2009, 12:08 AM
Yeah, but to be fair, the everyday flu can kill infants as well.

While that may be true, I'm not exposing her to a potential pandemic.

Would you expose your child?

Frazod
04-29-2009, 12:08 AM
Dude, we canceled our trip on Friday (were supposed to go Monday-Monday).

I have an infant and there's no way I'm chancing that shit. One of my best friends is a doctor and she offered to load us up on Tamiflu but it's just not worth it.

It's killed 149 peeps in Mexico and they expect that number to rise. That doesn't sound like much but I'll tell you what, Bro:

I don't want my daughter to be 150.

But there are still about 15,000,000 of them alive.

I understand that there's a risk, and if I had kids I probably wouldn't go, either. Hell, I wouldn't go there period.

But I do not buy into all the media-fueled doom and gloom. They overblow everything.

Pants
04-29-2009, 12:09 AM
While that may be true, I'm not exposing her to a potential pandemic.

Would you expose your child?

**** no. You're doing the right thing, not even a question.

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:10 AM
Yeah, but to be fair, the everyday flu can kill infants as well.

Only problem is, this isnt the everyday flu. The everyday flu doesnt kill this many people in such a small area within, what? 2 weeks?

DaneMcCloud
04-29-2009, 12:11 AM
But I do not buy into all the media-fueled doom and gloom. They overblow everything.

I know and I agree. And honestly, it's cost me a couple thousand to NOT go and re-schedule our vacation (we're going to Palm Springs instead).

But if there's a chance that my daughter might catch it and die, I gotta just say Fuck That.

This thing is a mixture of swine, bird and human flu. There's no vaccine and in all honesty, I don't fucking trust the Mexican health system IF my daughter (or wife) were to catch it.

I get sick about every 3 years, tops. I'm not worried about me.

I'm worried about them. It's MY duty to protect them.

Bottom line.

Pants
04-29-2009, 12:15 AM
Only problem is, this isnt the everyday flu. The everyday flu doesnt kill this many people in such a small area within, what? 2 weeks?

Sure it does. If a person has no medication to lower a severe flu-induced fever, they have a very good chance of dying. If those people in the slums had no access to Tylenol, for example, it wouldn't be unfathomable that some of them would succumb to the extremely high fever.

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:20 AM
Sure it does. If a person has no medication to lower a severe flu-induced fever, they have a very good chance of dying. If those people in the slums had no access to Tylenol, for example, it wouldn't be unfathomable that some of them would succumb to the extremely high fever.

I dont remember ever hearing about 200 people dying from the flu within 2 weeks in an area the size of Mexico. Maybe I dont get out enough or something? But I dont think this is a regular flu.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 12:22 AM
The regular flu has already killed 13000 people this year in the US alone which is a higher % than the "swine flu". The death tolls have finally leveled off after it caught people by surprise in mexico. And of the 100+ deaths that are linked to the swine flu...only 26 have been confirmed to be caused by it.

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:26 AM
The regular flu has already killed 13000 people this year in the US alone which is a higher % than the "swine flu". The death tolls have finally leveled off after it caught people by surprise in mexico. And of the 100+ deaths that are linked to the swine flu...only 26 have been confirmed to be caused by it.

What do I know about this? This is why I try to stay out of the DC forums. Ill stick to Chiefs :)

Pants
04-29-2009, 12:27 AM
I dont remember ever hearing about 200 people dying from the flu within 2 weeks in an area the size of Mexico. Maybe I dont get out enough or something? But I dont think this is a regular flu.

I don't know man...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swine_influenza

Sounds like it's just a regular flu symptom-wise. The problem is that we have trouble fighting it off so it spreads like wildfire, thus the pandemic.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 12:28 AM
Also, of course the death toll will be higher in a place like mexico city. 1/4 of the population doesn't have access to water. The air quality there is the worst in the world or pretty darn close which leads to respiratory diseases. You get any sort of flu there and your chances are worse than anywhere in the US by far, which is why no one else is dying imo.

KCrockaholic
04-29-2009, 12:34 AM
Also, of course the death toll will be higher in a place like mexico city. 1/4 of the population doesn't have access to water. The air quality there is the worst in the world or pretty darn close which leads to respiratory diseases. You get any sort of flu there and your chances are worse than anywhere in the US by far, which is why no one else is dying imo.

I guess we will see how everything looks in a few weeks.

WoodDraw
04-29-2009, 12:37 AM
So far, I think it's overblown as far as we need to be seriously worried.

From all accounts now, this strain of flue has been in Mexico for longer than we've heard about it. Only when the US randomly tested a flu patient did we learn about it. So, a lot of those deaths in Mexico could have come from trying to wait out the flu instead of trying to get help. Since the discovery, very few, if any, deaths have occurred.

If we start to see an escalation of deaths now, after prevention and treatment, I'll get worried. But right now, go on with your life.

Also, AFAIK, you can't be denied at least treatment at the border. If everything goes to hell, the US Embassy, or the US border, will quarantine and contain you. But, they can't just turn you back to Mexico and say good luck.

Dylan
04-29-2009, 12:55 AM
http://tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:vAzBvCyXbcw96M:http://cache.hyves-static.net/images/smilies/default/smiley_whistle.gif

QNS. SCHOOL FEAR
CANCUN TRIP EYED IN SWINE OUTBREAK

By ANGELA MONTEFINISE and MICHAEL BLAUSTEIN
April 26, 2009
Posted: 3:27 am
April 26, 2009

A group of Queens high school students likely brought Mexico's deadly swine flu epidemic to the city after they went on a wild spring-break party to Cancun earlier this month.

Some seniors from St. Francis Prep in Fresh Meadows took the trip over Easter hiatus two weeks ago. Days later, an outbreak of flu-like symptoms erupted at the school, leaving about 200 kids complaining of being ill.

Yesterday, city health officials confirmed that eight students "have probable human swine influenza" after testing positive for Influenza A, which officials say causes the swine strain of disease.

"We're very concerned about what may happen," Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Frieden said yesterday.

The finding prompted city health officials to contact all New York hospitals and put them on alert for the bug.

On Friday, officials tested nine kids at the 2,700-student school after some complained of nausea, dizziness, headache and other symptoms resembling swine flu, which has already killed at least 81 people in Mexico and sickened more than 1,300.

"In every single case, illness was mild," Frieden said of the St. Francis cases, adding that no one was hospitalized.

"Many of the children are feeling better."

The agency took also samples yesterday from a Bronx day-care center where 30 kids were reported sick, and took two calls from concerned parents whose kids were in Mexico and felt sick.

Some Manhattan residents who recently returned from Mexico have also called saying they were ill.

It is unclear if the eight high school students who tested positive were among the group that spent spring break in Cancun.

One of those students, football player Andrew Tagliavia, complained of sore throat and fever two days after returning from Mexico.

His mom, Angela, took him to a doctor, who said he "had a fever and maybe strep throat."

She didn't want to believe that her son may have gotten caught up in what the World Health Organization said may soon be a global pandemic.

"I don't think it's the swine flu from Mexico," Angela said yesterday."I'm not panicking."

The area's last outbreak of swine flu came in 1976, when the disease killed a soldier at Fort Dix, NJ. The bug killed 50 million people worldwide during a pandemic after World War I.

Kathy Troina, a St. Francis volunteer who has two sons at the school who are not sick, said the symptoms spread like wildfire.

"I personally know five or six kids who went on that trip, and they all seem to be sick," she said. "Then kids slap hands and touch things, and it spreads."

Mom Anastasia Vrettos has two sons -- a freshman and senior -- who became ill Thursday. Her oldest, James, still had a nasty cough last night.

"This whole thing is very, very strange," she said, adding that he's been treated with steroids and is being monitored by the family doctor.

The Health Department is sending samples from the school to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more testing.

If the illness is confirmed as swine flu today -- when results are expected -- officials plan to close St. Francis tomorrow, Frieden said.

He wouldn't comment on the Mexico trip, but said, "We are looking at travel histories of the students."

Spring break started April 9, and the students returned April 20.

The school was being sanitized this weekend, but that didn't stop around 400 alumni from turning out for a reunion last night.

"We've been here all afternoon and saw nothing of concern," said one reveler, who declined to give his name.

"The party was great."

But not everyone was so enthused. "I wouldn't have come into work today if I had known," said a bartender for the event.

The rapidly spreading virus has caused Mexico to declare a state of emergency, and caused 11 reported cases of swine flu in the United States, according to the CDC -- seven in California, two in Texas, and Kansas.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/04262009/news/regionalnews/qns__school_fear_166307.htm

kcfanXIII
04-29-2009, 12:58 AM
There are only a few confirmed cases in California. New York has it the worst right now. America is fine right now. But when nearly 200 people have died now in Mexico because of this flu its is certainly not overblown.

dude, something like 30,000 people die in the US from regular flu, EVERY YEAR!! the only way this (the swine flu) is a danger to the majority of citizens, is if its crossed with an air born strand. just media hype to drive up pharmaceutical stocks.

kcfanXIII
04-29-2009, 01:03 AM
http://www.infowars.com/swine-flu-and-martial-law/

http://www.infowars.com/swine-flu-is-deadly-mix-of-never-before-seen-viruses/

DaneMcCloud
04-29-2009, 01:11 AM
dude, something like 30,000 people die in the US from regular flu, EVERY YEAR!! the only way this (the swine flu) is a danger to the majority of citizens, is if its crossed with an air born strand.

Uhhhhhhhhhhh

BWillie
04-29-2009, 01:17 AM
If there is anytime it is good for the media to make something into a bigger issue than it is, it is public safety and health concerns like this. Makes people aware of this and how to prevent others from getting infected.

WoodDraw
04-29-2009, 01:17 AM
Uhhhhhhhhhhh

*puts on gas mask*


Seriously though, this flu is air born and transmitting human to human. The only thing left is to figure out if it's actually dangerous. At this point, no one has a clue. The flu mutates and spreads rapidly.

With the spanish flu, the same thing happened early where a mild flu popped up and then the next flu season everyone started dying. No one has any idea what will happen next. That's why you see so much activity right now.

Dylan
04-29-2009, 01:35 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/04/28/nyregion/28plane.600.jpg

Dominick Caglioti, who works at the Mercantile Exchange in lower Manhattan, thought the planes were headed straight for his window

<object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/RlCiYAMk8Lg&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/RlCiYAMk8Lg&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>


SPURS '9/11' EVAC IN NYC
Jet Flyover Frightens New Yorkers

By A.G. Sulzberger and Matthew L. Wald

APRIL 27, 2009: Witnesses described the engine roar as the planes swooped by office towers close enough to rattle the windows and prompt evacuations at scores of buildings. Some sobbed as they made their way to the street.

“As soon as someone saw how close it got to the buildings, people literally ran out,” said Carlina Rivera, 25, who works at an educational services company on the 22nd floor of 1 Liberty Plaza, adjacent to the site of the Sept. 11, 2001, attack. “Probably about 80 percent of my office left within two minutes of seeing how close it got to our building.”

Under federal regulations, in urban areas, airplanes must fly at least 1,000 feet above obstructions like buildings and bridges, and jetliner flights over Manhattan are typically at 8,000 feet or more. And planes do not typically approach local airports by flying low over the harbor.

As the fright wore off, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and other local leaders questioned why the Federal Aviation Administration had ordered local officials, including the New York Police Department, not to alert the public in advance.

An F.A.A. memo last week said information about the exercise “should only be shared with persons with a need to know” and “shall not be released to the public or the media.”

The breakdown of communication went deeper. Mr. Bloomberg said he first learned of the exercise when his BlackBerry started buzzing with messages from people asking if he knew what was going on.

Continues: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/28/nyregion/28plane.html?scp=2&sq=&st=nyt

Bob Dole
04-29-2009, 01:44 AM
just media hype to drive up pharmaceutical stocks.

And force every company in the country to spend resources preparing/updating their Pandemic Influenza Response Plan.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 02:22 AM
*puts on gas mask*


Seriously though, this flu is air born and transmitting human to human. The only thing left is to figure out if it's actually dangerous. At this point, no one has a clue. The flu mutates and spreads rapidly.

With the spanish flu, the same thing happened early where a mild flu popped up and then the next flu season everyone started dying. No one has any idea what will happen next. That's why you see so much activity right now.


I would agree if this flu is completely new....it's not. There have been cases of Swine Flu in the past and there is medicine to treat it. If it was Sars, plague, leprosy or something vile like that then hell yea, stay away...but it's not. It's the flu...just a different strand that they weren't ready for in Mexico.

DenverChief
04-29-2009, 02:54 AM
1) There is an antibiotic...4 to be exact.



Antibiotics are for bacteria not VIRUS

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 03:58 AM
Antibiotics are for bacteria not VIRUS

Ok, my mistake...Flu is a Virus. BUT there are 4 medicines that treat it like there are medicines that treat any other flu. Different strands of flu react to different forms of medications.


And I fixed it.

Hog Farmer
04-29-2009, 05:13 AM
This is WAAAAY overblown. The media really pisses me off in these kinds of circumstances. This flu will eventually spread across EVERY neighborhood just like any other flu. If you don't go to Cancun now then you can wait till next years flu viris. How many times do you hear that the flu vaccine thatas given out this year isn't the same flu thats going around. Think about it.

Back in 2001 a new flu hit my sow herd which was the H3N2 strain. It went through my herd fast. I had 10% of my sows abort their fetuses (104) to be exact. Some death loss in the Nursery / Finisher phases. After that my herd had established an immunity to the strain and everything was back to normal. It just caught me off guard and by the time I could respond it had done it's damage.

Same thing here. We now know it out ther, we'll all eventually get it. But now we know and can take appropriate action.

KcFanInGA
04-29-2009, 06:13 AM
Some are forgetting that previous flu strains were not this fast by any stretch to go full blown person to person. The avian flu didn't even hit that point. And while some antibiotics have proven effective against the US strain, there is no knowing if it will mutate further. I would take this very seriously, media coverage or no.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 07:02 AM
Some are forgetting that previous flu strains were not this fast by any stretch to go full blown person to person. The avian flu didn't even hit that point. And while some antibiotics have proven effective against the US strain, there is no knowing if it will mutate further. I would take this very seriously, media coverage or no.

Um, anti-biotics aren't EVER effective against ANY strain on influenza.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 07:05 AM
This is WAAAAY overblown. The media really pisses me off in these kinds of circumstances. This flu will eventually spread across EVERY neighborhood just like any other flu. If you don't go to Cancun now then you can wait till next years flu viris. How many times do you hear that the flu vaccine thatas given out this year isn't the same flu thats going around. Think about it.

Back in 2001 a new flu hit my sow herd which was the H3N2 strain. It went through my herd fast. I had 10% of my sows abort their fetuses (104) to be exact. Some death loss in the Nursery / Finisher phases. After that my herd had established an immunity to the strain and everything was back to normal. It just caught me off guard and by the time I could respond it had done it's damage.

Same thing here. We now know it out ther, we'll all eventually get it. But now we know and can take appropriate action.

And just like most influenza strains, lethality comes from the SYMPTOMS - primarily dehydration or secondary infection.

Good hygeine and not waiting until the last possible second to go to the doctor go a LONG WAY towards reducing mortality rates. As always, infants and the elderly are the most at risk.

Pablo
04-29-2009, 07:07 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090429/ap_on_he_me/med_swine_flu

There ya go, I guess this is the first case of a death in the U.S. from the "swine flu". 23 month old toddler in Texas.

Oh, and to answer your question, I'm sure it's fairly overblown..remember when we were all going to die from the "avian flu" and everyone was supposed to run out and buy Michael Jackson masks? If you're going with young children I wouldn't advise doing so.

EyePod
04-29-2009, 07:37 AM
I'd go. Everythings gonna be dead! There's gonna be basically nobody on the beaches, it'll be great! Unless you're single... then that blows ;)

jidar
04-29-2009, 07:38 AM
2 million people a year die of Malaria, but Bacon Aids gets all the press.

Sure-Oz
04-29-2009, 07:38 AM
Young children i say dont go, if its you i think you'll be alright, i think its overblown

jidar
04-29-2009, 07:40 AM
Some are forgetting that previous flu strains were not this fast by any stretch to go full blown person to person. The avian flu didn't even hit that point. And while some antibiotics have proven effective against the US strain, there is no knowing if it will mutate further. I would take this very seriously, media coverage or no.

Anti-biotics do nothing to viruses and that includes all strains of the flu. That's why people getting sick and then begging their dr for antibiotics is retarded. In fact some strains of the flu actually get a stronger grip on you if you take antibiotics.

Otter
04-29-2009, 07:44 AM
Didn't we have a resident micro-biologist on board here?

H1BN or something like that, where's he at with input on this matter?

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Monty
04-29-2009, 07:57 AM
Overblown, yes.

My only comment is that I have a team in Mexico City and they are all working from home this week just to be on the safe side, so use your best judgment. Everything I had to say has already been stated.

Lonewolf Ed
04-29-2009, 08:18 AM
While that may be true, I'm not exposing her to a potential pandemic.

Would you expose your child?

Two or three years from now, the potential pandemic that every news channel will be in a tizzy about will be even worse than the swine flu pandemic that is going to ravage the lands now. Just wait.

Donger
04-29-2009, 08:22 AM
There have been pandemic flu outbreaks before that have killed millions, so it seems logical that people are concerned. This isn't exactly theoretical.

Delano
04-29-2009, 08:34 AM
http://imgur.com/27K39.jpg

ElGringo
04-29-2009, 08:40 AM
I am living in Mexico, and understand the concerns. The entire country has shut down many facilities such as schools. I do not go around wearing the little stupid masks like many here do because of this, and I am not worried. If I do start feeling a little sick, I will immediately go to the doctor just to be safe. I believe it is media hype and not much else, but would recommend if you do go just make sure to stay clean, and possibly bring a little bottle of hand sanitizer to use every time you come in contact with anyone else. Other than that, I would say go for it, have a blast, and do not let the scares worry you.

WilliamTheIrish
04-29-2009, 09:01 AM
Waaaay overblown.

Dane is doing the smart thing as an infant's immune system isn't developed enough to take the chance.

But the majority of all deaths in these cases are the very young and the very old. IOW, those with an inability to fight off a virus because of undeveloped immune system or a suppressed immune system.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 09:14 AM
I am living in Mexico, and understand the concerns. The entire country has shut down many facilities such as schools. I do not go around wearing the little stupid masks like many here do because of this, and I am not worried. If I do start feeling a little sick, I will immediately go to the doctor just to be safe. I believe it is media hype and not much else, but would recommend if you do go just make sure to stay clean, and possibly bring a little bottle of hand sanitizer to use every time you come in contact with anyone else. Other than that, I would say go for it, have a blast, and do not let the scares worry you.

Do you know if Cancun is closed down like mexico city? I don't want to go and see all the shops and streets empty along with the clubs etc. I called the resort and they said everything was operating as usual down there with no changes. He said that no one was sick and everything was fine down there and the "scare" was in Mexico City and no where else. This obviously came from someone with a vested interest for us NOT to cancel...so if you know anything that would be awesome.

RINGLEADER
04-29-2009, 09:16 AM
Seems to be spreading -- now in people who have never been to Mexico. How far it goes depends on whether or not it burns itself out like the SARS virus did. SARS seemed to grow less virulent with each new person it infected. Probably won't be that lucky this time but it doesn't seem to have an extraordinary kill rate yet.

Read an interesting report yesterday that was done by a bunch of researchers examining the 1918-1919 H1N1 pandemic and they found that it hit in three waves -- a mild Spring outbreak, followed by a very harsh winter outbreak, and then ending with a mild Spring outbreak the following year. The vast majority of the deaths came from the winter outbreak and what the researchers discovered was that those who had contracted the earlier, milder version in the spring had some resistance to the later outbreak.

So if history is any indicator you should go out and catch the flu now -- before it's too late!

penguinz
04-29-2009, 09:18 AM
Probably already said but this is just this years version of the bird flu as far as media hype.

Lzen
04-29-2009, 09:49 AM
Jason Eberhart-Phillips, MD, MPH

Kansas State Health Officer
By now you are probably aware that an outbreak of swine flu has occurred in Mexico, with a few
cases now being reported in the United States. You may be alarmed by what you have heard, or
you may be wondering why public health authorities are so concerned.
Many of you are asking good questions about swine flu. At this early stage in the outbreak, some
questions don’t yet have reliable answers. As each day passes we are learning more, and we are
becoming more certain about the advice we give.
As of today, here is what we know:

1. This is a new virus, never before recognized in the United States or anywhere in the
world. The new virus contains genetic pieces from flu viruses that infect pigs, birds and
humans. It appears able to spread among humans like the familiar human flu viruses that
circulate in our communities every winter. Because this virus is new, we believe that no
one has natural immunity against it. Immunization with the seasonal flu vaccine is not
likely to offer protection.

2. Disease caused by the swine flu virus appears to be mild so far. Among the confirmed
cases in the United States, only one has required hospitalization. All have recovered, or
are now showing signs of recovery. The ability of the virus to cause serious disease may
change over time, or it may infect people who are less able to resist it effectively. There
are reports of deaths associated with swine flu infections in Mexico.

3. The disease is present in Kansas. As of today, we are aware of two cases of swine flu in
our state. One case followed a trip to Mexico. The other resulted from household contact
with the returning traveler. State and local public health staff are currently working hard
to identify additional cases and provide supporting laboratory work to characterize the
extent of the outbreak in Kansas.

4. Swine flu is treatable. While the new virus is resistant to certain anti-viral medications,
at the moment it remains sensitive to others. To be maximally effective in shortening the
length and severity of illness, these medications should be prescribed by a physician early
in the course of infection. As always, rest at home and drinking ample fluids is also
essential for a complete recovery.

5. Swine flu is preventable. While there is no vaccine that specifically protects against the
new virus, everyday steps that prevent the spread of germs are very effective in reducing
the risk of catching this disease. These include washing your hands thoroughly and often
with soap and warm water or alcohol-based hand sanitizers, staying at least six feet away
from people who are coughing and sneezing, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle with a
balanced diet and plenty of rest and exercise. Those who develop flu symptoms must stay
home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible for a period of seven days
from the onset of illness.

6. We can beat this. Your state and local public health professionals, together with Kansas
health care providers, have been preparing and training for the arrival of a new flu virus
in our communities for years. Working with colleagues at the federal Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, we will monitor the activity of this new infectious agent and take
all the necessary steps to curtail its spread. Your role in this is critical: to remain
informed, to consult your health care provider if you become ill, and to follow the advice
you receive on ways to protect your community. We will continue to update the KDHE
web site (www.kdheks.gov) and encourage you to use it as a resource for swine flu
information. Thank you all for your interest and support.

Dr. Eberhart-Phillips is the Kansas State Health Officer and the Director of Division of Health
in the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.
# # #
As the state’s environmental protection and public health agency, KDHE promotes responsible
choices to protect the health and environment for all Kansans.
Through education, direct services and the assessment of data and trends, coupled with policy
development and enforcement, KDHE will improve health and quality of life. We prevent illness,
injuries and foster a safe and sustainable environment for the people of Kansas.

Frazod
04-29-2009, 09:57 AM
I think we should nuke Kansas from orbit.

It's the only way to be sure.

:)

Sure-Oz
04-29-2009, 10:36 AM
we have the news on here at work all day and ive heard the word swine flu about 430,000 times now, man if i had a .25 for everytime....

yes it's way the fuck overblown!

wild1
04-29-2009, 10:39 AM
The toddler who died in Texas came into the United States from Mexico for treatment, and already had a litany of preexisting health problems.

Iowanian
04-29-2009, 10:43 AM
I would agree if this flu is completely new....it's not. There have been cases of Swine Flu in the past and there is medicine to treat it. If it was Sars, plague, leprosy or something vile like that then hell yea, stay away...but it's not. It's the flu...just a different strand that they weren't ready for in Mexico.


I know you....you're the guy in Vegas that was going to screw the hooker with the yellow eyes and the cough, because its probably just strep throat and you can get a pill.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 10:46 AM
Um, anti-biotics aren't EVER effective against ANY strain on influenza.

exactment. and, as always, the confusion of this leads to a further risk, antibiotic resistant forms of bacteria (MRSA is famous, but others have made the jump). I did a presentation a while back on how our culture's dependence on 'antibiotic' everything (soap, purell, etc) has really weakened us and opened us up to a LOT of new maladies... I won't pull out the boring evidence, but there's a lot of cases of harmless bacteria in our bodies that harbor antibiotic resistence to antibiotics they've never come in contact with due to extracellular dna strands as well as stomach bacteria that are resistant to an amazing plethora of antibiotics that they haven't come in contact with.

scary stuff--a lot of european countries have pulled the antibiotic soap/hand sanitizers off the shelf, as they really do nothing but give the illusion of 'safety,' while doing more harm than good.

Fish
04-29-2009, 10:47 AM
http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/8189/posterp.jpg

Pants
04-29-2009, 10:51 AM
exactment. and, as always, the confusion of this leads to a further risk, antibiotic resistant forms of bacteria (MRSA is famous, but others have made the jump). I did a presentation a while back on how our culture's dependence on 'antibiotic' everything (soap, purell, etc) has really weakened us and opened us up to a LOT of new maladies... I won't pull out the boring evidence, but there's a lot of cases of harmless bacteria in our bodies that harbor antibiotic resistence to antibiotics they've never come in contact with due to extracellular dna strands as well as stomach bacteria that are resistant to an amazing plethora of antibiotics that they haven't come in contact with.

scary stuff--a lot of european countries have pulled the antibiotic soap/hand sanitizers off the shelf, as they really do nothing but give the illusion of 'safety,' while doing more harm than good.

I ****ing hate doctors who prescribe Z-Paks, et al like it's ****ing candy. And I hate people that go see the doctor for dumbest ****ing reasons. Nobody can take being sickish for more than a day anymore.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 10:55 AM
I fucking hate doctors who prescribe Z-Packs, et al like it's fucking candy. And I hate people that go see the doctor for dumbest fucking reasons. Nobody can take being sickish for more than a day anymore.

it really is sad, and we're alarmingly ignorant when it comes to the consequences of this sort of behavior. hell, a lot of times when people are sick, the doctor will say 'it's probably some sort of virus... lemme prescribe you an antibiotic!' it's really pathetic.

even worse is our vaccinations/feeding of antibiotics en masse to livestock--there's a ton of evidence that there are massive hot zones of antibiotic resistance in and for miles around livestock water basins, both in the water and soil.

if we're looking at a major issue in the future, this may be a possibility.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 10:57 AM
There have been pandemic flu outbreaks before that have killed millions, so it seems logical that people are concerned. This isn't exactly theoretical.

Over 90% of those "millions" died in under-developed countries or in sanitary conditions that weren't up to par with modern 1st-world nations.

Dying from the flu is generally a product of poverty, stupidity, or both.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 10:59 AM
exactment. and, as always, the confusion of this leads to a further risk, antibiotic resistant forms of bacteria (MRSA is famous, but others have made the jump). I did a presentation a while back on how our culture's dependence on 'antibiotic' everything (soap, purell, etc) has really weakened us and opened us up to a LOT of new maladies... I won't pull out the boring evidence, but there's a lot of cases of harmless bacteria in our bodies that harbor antibiotic resistence to antibiotics they've never come in contact with due to extracellular dna strands as well as stomach bacteria that are resistant to an amazing plethora of antibiotics that they haven't come in contact with.

scary stuff--a lot of european countries have pulled the antibiotic soap/hand sanitizers off the shelf, as they really do nothing but give the illusion of 'safety,' while doing more harm than good.

Exactly. Not only are these crazies NOT doing anything to help themselves prevent or treat the flu, they're helping the rest of us by creating antibiotic resistant super-bacteria.

Assholes.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 11:00 AM
we have the news on here at work all day and ive heard the word swine flu about 430,000 times now, man if i had a .25 for everytime....

yes it's way the **** overblown!

Well, the good news is that even though I've heard "swine flu" 40 million times in the last 2 days, I haven't heard the word "Twitter" ONCE. ROFL

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:09 AM
Over 90% of those "millions" died in under-developed countries or in sanitary conditions that weren't up to par with modern 1st-world nations.

Dying from the flu is generally a product of poverty, stupidity, or both.

I can kind of get behind this, but not 100%. in a true pandemic setting, a certain fear takes over. the sad truth of the matter is that I've talked to several people in the public health field (that I'm going into after I'm done with school) that have confirmed what many of us already know--we're completely unprepared for any sort of pandemic--if a lot of people get sick concurrently, we have neither the resources, nurses, doctors or hospital beds to properly contain an epidemic of any great size. the barrier techniques fall apart when supplies are short, and we don't have the carrying capacity in our hospitals to really contain anything of any major size.

so are we more prepared than we were in 1918? yeah. of course. but when it really comes down to it, you can never be 100% prepared for this sort of thing.

MOhillbilly
04-29-2009, 11:10 AM
Exactly. Not only are these crazies NOT doing anything to help themselves prevent or treat the flu, they're helping the rest of us by creating antibiotic resistant super-bacteria.

Assholes.

i counter this by lettin the dog lick my plate before i put it back in the clean pile.

jAZ
04-29-2009, 11:12 AM
Canceled our planned trip with the wife, kid and friends to the beach in Mexico.

Threat of violence was not a concern, and where we are going isn't experiencing a cluster, but it's just stupid for me to put my son at risk. Others might have a different situation.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:12 AM
i counter this by lettin the dog lick my plate before i put it back in the clean pile.

heh, sad fact number 8943: a dog's mouth contains less bacteria than the average person's mouth.

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:13 AM
Over 90% of those "millions" died in under-developed countries or in sanitary conditions that weren't up to par with modern 1st-world nations.

Dying from the flu is generally a product of poverty, stupidity, or both.

I could be wrong, but I seem to recall that the 1918 pandemic killed almost one million in the States.

The evil part of me hopes it hits, so I can sell these masks.

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:15 AM
heh, sad fact number 8943: a dog's mouth contains less bacteria than the average person's mouth.

Yeah, but I'm pretty sure mine doesn't contain feces and urine, either. Well, most of the time.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:17 AM
I could be wrong, but I seem to recall that the 1918 pandemic killed almost one million in the States.

The evil part of me hopes it hits, so I can sell these masks.

let's be honest though--the US in 1918 is a far cry from the US in 2009. we're MUCH more prepared for an epidemic than we were back then. however, as previously stated, you're never 100% prepared.

and fun fact: there's some evidence that the 1918 flu pandemic (which was likely of avian origin rather than 'swine' origin) actually started in the cantonments in the US in 1917 that woodrow wilson established to prepare us for WWI. they were overcrowded and the flu variant festered, grew in virulence, and went with us over to europe (or so some very convincing evidence states)

MOhillbilly
04-29-2009, 11:17 AM
I could be wrong, but I seem to recall that the 1918 pandemic killed almost one million in the States.

The evil part of me hopes it hits, so I can sell these masks.

disaster profiteer.

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:19 AM
let's be honest though--the US in 1918 is a far cry from the US in 2009. we're MUCH more prepared for an epidemic than we were back then. however, as previously stated, you're never 100% prepared.

and fun fact: there's some evidence that the 1918 flu pandemic (which was likely of avian origin rather than 'swine' origin) actually started in the cantonments in the US in 1917 that woodrow wilson established to prepare us for WWI. they were overcrowded and the flu variant festered, grew in virulence, and went with us over to europe (or so some very convincing evidence states)

How are we more prepared? Could you cite some examples? Not being argumentative, mind you, I'd just like some of the less obvious examples.

Does population density come into the mix?

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:27 AM
How are we more prepared? Could you cite some examples? Not being argumentative, mind you, I'd just like some of the less obvious examples.

Does population density come into the mix?

we're more prepared in the following ways (just off the top of my head--there are likely more that will come to my mind as I'm driving to class here in ten minutes, and I'll post those later)

1) we have a better understand of the human immune system and how it works--this comes in handy when you try to make a vaccine (obviously)

2) as a whole, doctors are better trained at dealing with pathogens than they were in 1918... when we barely had any idea what a pathogen really was

3) we have better equipment for synthesizing vaccines in great numbers (rather than using livestock like pigs and horses like they did in 1918)

4) as short as we are on hospital beds if an epidemic were to start, we have much more than we did in 1918. I've read that a lot of cities have stockpiled supplies necessary in a pandemic, which we obviously didn't have in 1918.


I know there are many more than that, but I've got class here in 30 minutes and have to drive there. on the whole, though, I'd chalk it up to our modern health care system... we have a much greater understanding/appreciation of how things work than we did in 1918. the biggest fear I have is that viruses/bacteria are easier to spread than they've ever been with our modern transportation system.

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:29 AM
we're more prepared in the following ways (just off the top of my head--there are likely more that will come to my mind as I'm driving to class here in ten minutes, and I'll post those later)

1) we have a better understand of the human immune system and how it works--this comes in handy when you try to make a vaccine (obviously)

2) as a whole, doctors are better trained at dealing with pathogens than they were in 1918... when we barely had any idea what a pathogen really was

3) we have better equipment for synthesizing vaccines in great numbers (rather than using livestock like pigs and horses like they did in 1918)

4) as short as we are on hospital beds if an epidemic were to start, we have much more than we did in 1918. I've read that a lot of cities have stockpiled supplies necessary in a pandemic, which we obviously didn't have in 1918.


I know there are many more than that, but I've got class here in 30 minutes and have to drive there. on the whole, though, I'd chalk it up to our modern health care system... we have a much greater understanding/appreciation of how things work than we did in 1918. the biggest fear I have is that viruses/bacteria are easier to spread than they've ever been with our modern transportation system.

Interesting. Thank you. How long does it take from initial infection to that person being contagious?

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:32 AM
Interesting. Thank you. How long does it take from initial infection to that person being contagious?

depends on the virus, obviously. in this case, I'm not 100% up on this variant of influenza. in general, it's a few weeks (though it can be much shorter in some cases).

Otter
04-29-2009, 11:33 AM
depends on the virus, obviously. in this case, I'm not 100% up on this variant of influenza. in general, it's a few weeks (though it can be much shorter in some cases).

So the virus sits dormant for a few weeks? If I'm understanding that correctly, scary.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:34 AM
oh, and to your previous question, population density has a LOT to do with how epidemics start and spread. there was a paper I read a long while back in which a guy laid out how he's using computer simulation along with real-life feedback from various people as to how many person-to-person interactions occur on a daily basis. with his software (which is actually used by several cities in the US, IIRC) we can track epidemics in way we've never been able to before.

anyway. off to class.

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:34 AM
depends on the virus, obviously. in this case, I'm not 100% up on this variant of influenza. in general, it's a few weeks (though it can be much shorter in some cases).

Isn't the present virus one that has not been seen before? A variant of H1N1, but still never seen before?

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 11:35 AM
I could be wrong, but I seem to recall that the 1918 pandemic killed almost one million in the States.

The evil part of me hopes it hits, so I can sell these masks.

Sanitary and hygienic conditions, as well as general education about viral infections, were vastly inferior in 1918.

This is a giant generalization, but often times THE key to surviving influenza is just drinking more water.

Ebolapox
04-29-2009, 11:37 AM
So the virus sits dormant for a few weeks? If I'm understanding that correctly, scary.

not really 'dormant,' per se. when it enters the host (us), it takes a few weeks for it to really begin to effect us--it's in the 'lytic' cycle (entering cells, reproducing, making more copies of itself, etc). after a while (depending on the incubation period), it enters the lysogenic cycle (where it bursts from cells and when you generally get the classic body's response to invasion)

Donger
04-29-2009, 11:37 AM
not really 'dormant,' per se. when it enters the host (us), it takes a few weeks for it to really begin to effect us--it's in the 'lytic' cycle (entering cells, reproducing, making more copies of itself, etc). after a while (depending on the incubation period), it enters the lysogenic cycle (where it bursts from cells and when you generally get the classic body's response to invasion)

Off to class, young Dustin Hoffman! Save us all!!!

KingPriest2
04-29-2009, 11:44 AM
Only problem is, this isnt the everyday flu. The everyday flu doesnt kill this many people in such a small area within, what? 2 weeks?

No it just kills 1000 a week
Posted via Mobile Device

Otter
04-29-2009, 11:50 AM
not really 'dormant,' per se. when it enters the host (us), it takes a few weeks for it to really begin to effect us--it's in the 'lytic' cycle (entering cells, reproducing, making more copies of itself, etc). after a while (depending on the incubation period), it enters the lysogenic cycle (where it bursts from cells and when you generally get the classic body's response to invasion)

I had no idea the time from infection to effects were that long. That puts a huge hole in my pandemic reaction plan.

Who will be left to fight the zombies?

I must fall back and regroup.

jiveturkey
04-29-2009, 11:58 AM
Has anyone heard from Hog Farmer? I'm guessing that he's built up a tolerance and will rule us all with his army of seamen producing hogs.

Dylan
04-29-2009, 12:02 PM
The World Health Organization, the Center for Disease Control and The U.S. Dept of Human Services declared an Epidemic and Pandemic Alert, not the Media. Just saying...


Swine Flu: Information
The United States Department of Health and Human Services has declared an emergency regarding an outbreak of swine flu. Employees are encouraged to stay at home and seek medical advice, if they are experiencing any flu-like symptoms. Also, employees who are returning from travel from a target area (in this case, Mexico) should stay at home until a reasonable incubation period has passed.

As with any infectious respiratory disease, the following precautionary measures are recommended:

Cover your nose & mouth with disposable tissues when sneezing, coughing, wiping and blowing your nose.

Dispose of used tissues in the nearest waste bin.

Wash your hands often with soap and water, and especially after coughing and sneezing. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.

Clean hard surfaces (e.g., door handles) frequently using a normal cleaning product.
Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

If you are sick with flu, stay at home to avoid spreading infection to others. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.


You can keep up-to-date on developments via:

The Center for Disease Control’s Web site, dedicated to swine flu information.
http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/

NYTimes.com’s Times Topic: Swine Flu
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/influenza/swine_influenza/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier


In addition you can download any of the following materials:

Swine Flu Frequently Asked Questions
http://web.nytimes.com/xpedio/groups/public/@corp/@econnect/documents/document/229298.pdf

Good Health Habits to Preventing Seasonal Flu
http://web.nytimes.com/xpedio/groups/public/@corp/@econnect/documents/document/229299.pdf

Center for Disease Control Information Fact Sheet: Swine Influenza
http://web.nytimes.com/xpedio/groups/public/@corp/@econnect/documents/document/229300.pdf


There... Now, you're all setup and taken care of. :D

sedated
04-29-2009, 12:05 PM
"That's no tragedy. How many people do you lose on a normal cruise? 30?"
<img src="http://www.fact-archive.com/encyclopedia/upload/thumb/1/16/200px-George_Costanza.JPG">

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 12:11 PM
The World Health Organization, the Center for Disease Control and The U.S. Dept of Human Services declared an Epidemic and Pandemic Alert, not the Media. Just saying...

You act like those organizations don't have a vested interest in swaying the minds of millions of hapless sheeple...

Otter
04-29-2009, 12:28 PM
You act like those organizations don't have a vested interest in swaying the minds of millions of hapless sheeple...

Can you imagine what this is doing for next years budget allocation from the feds?

Everyone (you, me, obama, cdc, weezie from the jeffersons) is pretty clueless giving the incubation period. In two weeks we'll have a clue but until then I encourage everyone to take to the streets and panic.

luv
04-29-2009, 12:47 PM
My throat is getting sore. Am I going to die?

Otter
04-29-2009, 12:52 PM
My throat is getting sore. Am I going to die?

Yes, but you'll come back to "life" as a brain hungry zombie roaming the earth aimlessly for survivors.

Dylan
04-29-2009, 01:28 PM
You act like those organizations don't have a vested interest in swaying the minds of millions of hapless sheeple...

Fair point. Now, let's do a flyover and buzz the city. :D

ElGringo
04-29-2009, 01:29 PM
Damn, this swine flu thing is starting to suck. I would try to find someone without a vested interested in you going to Mexico and near cancun to try to figure out what all is still available. My wife just went out to try to unload our change on the local bar, and apparently all the bars are closed due to this stuff. Now, I live no where near Cancun, or Mexico City, and I really have not heard of anyone near where I live having the flu, but they are closing everything to be on the cautious side (thankfully my internet cafe is still open with the kids out of school, it is doing great). I do not believe they will be closing things in tourist towns the way they are here, but I do not know. My wife just told me she believes they are closing, or will be closing most things in Cancun as well, but I would not take either of our words for it.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 01:34 PM
Damn, this swine flu thing is starting to suck. I would try to find someone without a vested interested in you going to Mexico and near cancun to try to figure out what all is still available. My wife just went out to try to unload our change on the local bar, and apparently all the bars are closed due to this stuff. Now, I live no where near Cancun, or Mexico City, and I really have not heard of anyone near where I live having the flu, but they are closing everything to be on the cautious side (thankfully my internet cafe is still open with the kids out of school, it is doing great). I do not believe they will be closing things in tourist towns the way they are here, but I do not know. My wife just told me she believes they are closing, or will be closing most things in Cancun as well, but I would not take either of our words for it.


Really? I spoke with the manager of our resort today and the travel agent and they said that everything was still open in cancun/playa del carmen etc. There are also NO reported cases from cancun from what the WHO says. As of today, only 26 with 7 deaths confirmed cases of actual Swine Flu have been proven...the other numbers are regular flu/pneumonia etc. They also said that there are 91 confirmed cases here. That tells me that I have a slightly higher chance of contracting it here than in Mexico

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 01:35 PM
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_04_29/en/index.html

Swine influenza - update 5

29 April 2009 -- The situation continues to evolve rapidly. As of 18:00 GMT, 29 April 2009, nine countries have officially reported 148 cases of swine influenza A/H1N1 infection. The United States Government has reported 91 laboratory confirmed human cases, with one death. Mexico has reported 26 confirmed human cases of infection including seven deaths.

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (13), Germany (3), Israel (2), New Zealand (3), Spain (4) and the United Kingdom (5).

Further information on the situation will be available on the WHO website on a regular basis.

WHO advises no restriction of regular travel or closure of borders. It is considered prudent for people who are ill to delay international travel and for people developing symptoms following international travel to seek medical attention, in line with guidance from national authorities.

There is also no risk of infection from this virus from consumption of well-cooked pork and pork products. Individuals are advised to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water on a regular basis and should seek medical attention if they develop any symptoms of influenza-like illness.

jaa1025
04-29-2009, 01:35 PM
http://www.smh.com.au/world/only-7-swine-flu-deaths-not-152-says-who-20090429-aml1.html

Only 7 swine flu deaths, not 152, says WHO

* April 29, 2009 - 4:34PM

A street performer wears a mask painted silver in Mexico City.

A street performer wears a mask painted silver in Mexico City.

A member of the World Health Organisation (WHO) has dismissed claims that more than 150 people have died from swine flu, saying it has officially recorded only seven deaths around the world.

Vivienne Allan, from WHO's patient safety program, said the body had confirmed that worldwide there had been just seven deaths - all in Mexico - and 79 confirmed cases of the disease.
Sydney's swine scared arrivals

Face masks are worn by some at Sydney Airport, but many say strict new swine flu precautions are in reality 'low key'.

"Unfortunately that [150-plus deaths] is incorrect information and it does happen, but that's not information that's come from the World Health Organisation," Ms Allan told ABC Radio today.

"That figure is not a figure that's come from the World Health Organisation and, I repeat, the death toll is seven and they are all from Mexico."

Ms Allan said WHO had confirmed 40 cases of swine flu in the Americas, 26 in Mexico, six in Canada, two in Spain, two in Britain and three in New Zealand.

Ms Allan said it was difficult to measure how fast the virus was spreading.

She said a real concern would be if the flu virus manifested in a country where a person had had no contact with Mexico, and authorities were watching all countries for signs of that.

"There is no pattern that has emerged at this stage to be able to say that it is spreading in a particular way or it is spreading into a particular country ... the situation is continuing to evolve," she said.

She said the WHO was not recommending against overseas travel, but urged those who felt sick to stay home and others to ensure they kept their hands clean.

No decision had yet been made about vaccinations.

"This virus is not airborne, it's caused by droplets ... so it's not a time for worry. It's a time to be prepared," Ms Allan said.

Fish
04-29-2009, 01:54 PM
Really? I spoke with the manager of our resort today and the travel agent and they said that everything was still open in cancun/playa del carmen etc. There are also NO reported cases from cancun from what the WHO says. As of today, only 26 with 7 deaths confirmed cases of actual Swine Flu have been proven...the other numbers are regular flu/pneumonia etc. They also said that there are 91 confirmed cases here. That tells me that I have a slightly higher chance of contracting it here than in Mexico

Do you believe they would be honest in light of the fact that telling people otherwise would ruin business?

Personally, I wouldn't be worried. But I'd question whether a resort manager or travel agent would truly have your best interest in mind.

luv
04-29-2009, 01:58 PM
Yes, but you'll come back to "life" as a brain hungry zombie roaming the earth aimlessly for survivors.

Cool!

ElGringo
04-29-2009, 02:06 PM
If it were me, I would go without a doubt. Assuming you are not taking any children or elderly people, everything should be fine. The upside of all this is many people are not going, there should be more señoritas per gringo, and not a huge crowd (I personally do not like crowds)

RJ
04-29-2009, 02:22 PM
The toddler who died in Texas came into the United States from Mexico for treatment, and already had a litany of preexisting health problems.


I read he was in Brownsville visiting relatives when he became sick.

RJ
04-29-2009, 02:25 PM
Over 90% of those "millions" died in under-developed countries or in sanitary conditions that weren't up to par with modern 1st-world nations.

Dying from the flu is generally a product of poverty, stupidity, or both.



In the fall of 1918 the Great War in Europe was winding down and peace was on the horizon. The Americans had joined in the fight, bringing the Allies closer to victory against the Germans. Deep within the trenches these men lived through some of the most brutal conditions of life, which it seemed could not be any worse. Then, in pockets across the globe, something erupted that seemed as benign as the common cold. The influenza of that season, however, was far more than a cold. In the two years that this scourge ravaged the earth, a fifth of the world's population was infected. The flu was most deadly for people ages 20 to 40. This pattern of morbidity was unusual for influenza which is usually a killer of the elderly and young children. It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice). An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influenza during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the U.S. soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not to the enemy (Deseret News). An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby). 1918 would go down as unforgettable year of suffering and death and yet of peace. As noted in the Journal of the American Medical Association final edition of 1918:


http://virus.stanford.edu/uda/

RJ
04-29-2009, 02:29 PM
Well, the good news is that even though I've heard "swine flu" 40 million times in the last 2 days, I haven't heard the word "Twitter" ONCE. ROFL


That's certainly a plus.

RJ
04-29-2009, 02:40 PM
Really? I spoke with the manager of our resort today and the travel agent and they said that everything was still open in cancun/playa del carmen etc. There are also NO reported cases from cancun from what the WHO says. As of today, only 26 with 7 deaths confirmed cases of actual Swine Flu have been proven...the other numbers are regular flu/pneumonia etc. They also said that there are 91 confirmed cases here. That tells me that I have a slightly higher chance of contracting it here than in Mexico


You seem like your mind was made up before you started the thread.

Like Hog Farmer pointed out in another thread.....the problem for people here isn't the going, it's the coming back. Don't get anything on you that you can't wash off.

As an aside, it seems like this wouldn't be the best time to "find a nice little senorita or two". Right now, I'd have to pass on swapping spit with some Mexican girl I'd just met. But hey, that's just me. Perhaps I'm overly cautious.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 08:56 PM
In the fall of 1918 the Great War in Europe was winding down and peace was on the horizon. The Americans had joined in the fight, bringing the Allies closer to victory against the Germans. Deep within the trenches these men lived through some of the most brutal conditions of life, which it seemed could not be any worse. Then, in pockets across the globe, something erupted that seemed as benign as the common cold. The influenza of that season, however, was far more than a cold. In the two years that this scourge ravaged the earth, a fifth of the world's population was infected. The flu was most deadly for people ages 20 to 40. This pattern of morbidity was unusual for influenza which is usually a killer of the elderly and young children. It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice). An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influenza during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the U.S. soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not to the enemy (Deseret News). An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby). 1918 would go down as unforgettable year of suffering and death and yet of peace. As noted in the Journal of the American Medical Association final edition of 1918:


http://virus.stanford.edu/uda/

It was NINETEEN FREAKING EIGHTEEN.

Furthermore, we were talking also about 2 other pandemics that have happened more recently than the 1918 incident.

RJ
04-29-2009, 09:03 PM
It was NINETEEN FREAKING EIGHTEEN.

Furthermore, we were talking also about 2 other pandemics that have happened more recently than the 1918 incident.


I'm not saying we're facing a crisis. I seriously doubt we are. On the other hand, I wouldn't personally be hopping on a plane to Mexico tomorrow hoping to pick up some strange pussy.

Wouldn't be prudent.

wild1
04-29-2009, 09:05 PM
It was NINETEEN FREAKING EIGHTEEN.

Furthermore, we were talking also about 2 other pandemics that have happened more recently than the 1918 incident.

No kidding. I bet that a lot of people died of random illnesses back in the days where they'd saw your leg off because of a bullet wound or treat infections with leeches.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 09:06 PM
I'm not saying we're facing a crisis. I seriously doubt we are. On the other hand, I wouldn't personally be hopping on a plane to Mexico tomorrow hoping to pick up some strange pussy.

Wouldn't be prudent.

ROFL

I wouldn't do something like that even without the swine flu.

htismaqe
04-29-2009, 09:07 PM
No kidding. I bet that a lot of people died of random illnesses back in the days where they'd saw your leg off because of a bullet wound or treat infections with leeches.

I know of a guy that died from a toothache. He had an abcess in his tooth and figured he'd "tough it out". It spread from his tooth to the side of his face and then into his brain.

RJ
04-29-2009, 09:07 PM
ROFL

I wouldn't do something like that even without the swine flu.



True, but I'm guessing you're a bit older and wiser than the thread starter.

:)

Pioli Zombie
04-29-2009, 09:51 PM
I'm sure this won't set off every person in America with OCD. Not at all.
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Pioli Zombie
04-29-2009, 09:56 PM
I'm not saying we're facing a crisis. I seriously doubt we are. On the other hand, I wouldn't personally be hopping on a plane to Mexico tomorrow hoping to pick up some strange pussy.

Wouldn't be prudent.

Still safer than sleeping with Courtney Love.
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kcfanXIII
04-29-2009, 10:57 PM
Seems to be spreading -- now in people who have never been to Mexico. How far it goes depends on whether or not it burns itself out like the SARS virus did. SARS seemed to grow less virulent with each new person it infected. Probably won't be that lucky this time but it doesn't seem to have an extraordinary kill rate yet.

Read an interesting report yesterday that was done by a bunch of researchers examining the 1918-1919 H1N1 pandemic and they found that it hit in three waves -- a mild Spring outbreak, followed by a very harsh winter outbreak, and then ending with a mild Spring outbreak the following year. The vast majority of the deaths came from the winter outbreak and what the researchers discovered was that those who had contracted the earlier, milder version in the spring had some resistance to the later outbreak.

So if history is any indicator you should go out and catch the flu now -- before it's too late!


thats interesting, do you have a link?

Red Beans
04-30-2009, 06:25 AM
I'm going out on a limb and saying it's not that serious. I'm pretty sure I've got the swine flu right now. You see, I've been squealing quite a bit lately, my neighbors hate me right now. I've also been rooting through the garbage more than usual, eating the food scraps and well, anything else remotely tasty in there. Also, whenever I'm outside I find myself eating acorns...go figure

MahiMike
04-30-2009, 06:27 AM
It's a scam.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/04/29/Swine-Flu.aspx

Dartgod
04-30-2009, 07:22 AM
I hate big flu.

Sure-Oz
04-30-2009, 07:25 AM
1st case in parkville missouri now, omg run away kcmizzou!

kcfanXIII
04-30-2009, 07:43 AM
I had no idea the time from infection to effects were that long. That puts a huge hole in my pandemic reaction plan.

Who will be left to fight the zombies?

I must fall back and regroup.

meet me in 28 days... later.... from now....

Otter
04-30-2009, 08:09 AM
.

kcfanXIII
04-30-2009, 08:26 AM
http://www.wallpapergate.com/data/media/242/28_days_later_001.jpg

luv
04-30-2009, 08:29 AM
1st case in parkville missouri now, omg run away kcmizzou!

The man has kids in school. Worst place for germs. Was it a child?

I heard there was a case in KC.

KcFanInGA
04-30-2009, 09:16 AM
We do not have 4 vaccines that work, we have a few that work SOMETIMES. Also, I am concerned by the whole zero immunity thing. Guess we will just have to see. But this cant be good for the economy.

Sure-Oz
04-30-2009, 09:20 AM
The man has kids in school. Worst place for germs. Was it a child?

I heard there was a case in KC.

I think it was some old guy

Sure-Oz
04-30-2009, 09:22 AM
I know of a guy that died from a toothache. He had an abcess in his tooth and figured he'd "tough it out". It spread from his tooth to the side of his face and then into his brain.

I had that happen, except i got it treated within 4 or 5 days with antibiotics...the pain was too much to 'tough' it out...and the swelling in my jaw and face sucked too...after the antibiotics worked i got it removed, it was a wisdom tooth, got them all out then too!

Scary business

whoman69
04-30-2009, 10:05 AM
While I believe the fear is overblown just as it was for avian flu, it doesn't make sense to take a risk.

kcfanXIII
04-30-2009, 10:26 AM
you know what we have zero immunity to, and zero vaccines for?




































zombies

Joe Seahawk
04-30-2009, 01:27 PM
Seattle's Madrona middle school posted this sign..

2 Questions..
1. Do you really need to close the school for 7 days?
2. What kind of embicile made this sign. Glad to see our educators are literate..:rolleyes:

http://media.bonnint.net/seattle/2/202/20287.jpg

catfish307
04-30-2009, 01:56 PM
Welcom to Cancun! If drinkin the water or the cartels don't kill you, the flu will. Enjoy your stay!

MOhillbilly
04-30-2009, 02:14 PM
Its made another species jump.

Iowanian
04-30-2009, 02:52 PM
I'm pretty sure this is the prequel to "I am Legend".

J Diddy
04-30-2009, 02:59 PM
I'm pretty sure this is the prequel to "I am Legend".


It's all good, will smith is still with us. Ain't no virus got nothing on the Fresh Prince.

Donger
04-30-2009, 03:02 PM
And the three top sellers on Amazon?

Masks!

ROFL

jaa1025
04-30-2009, 06:28 PM
Whew...didn't think it was going to happen but I talked my friend from backing out this Saturday. Of course, I'll feel like crap if she gets it, spreads it to all her kids at school (teacher) and everyone dies....but at least we'll have fun.


I wonder how much money this "swine flu pandemic" is making the news networks, pharmacies, drug companies and the government. What better to kick start the economy than a "pandemic"? Which is the opposite effect that fear normally has on the market, but it shifts peoples fears from the stock market to this laughable "threat".

luv
05-04-2009, 10:10 AM
I keep a bottle of hand sanitizer on my desk at work. I noticed I was getting low last week, so I went to look for some more. I went to Walmart on my lunch break, and they only had two bottles left. Out of every size and brand...two bottles. I was at a different Walmart (they're everywhere around here) over the weekend looking for something else. I was in that isle, and as aI walked by, I noticed they were COMPLETELY out of hand sanitizer.

No big deal. I mean, I don't know if they usually run low. Just wondered how many people are so freaked out about the swine flu.

Germ-X is definitely making a killing.

doomy3
05-04-2009, 11:11 AM
Another confirmed case in Kansas City today...I think they said Wyandotte County, but I am not sure

Pioli Zombie
05-04-2009, 12:19 PM
All I can think of is the townspeople of Bikini Bottom running away from Wormy*

*spongebob reference.
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