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View Full Version : Misc CP Cultural Hour: Shakespeare, Bach, Plato, Emerson, What's on your mind


FAX
05-15-2009, 09:53 PM
Just brewed a cup of Earl Grey tea and added some lemon and honey so if anyone would like to discuss philosophy, poetry, classical music, cultural anthropology, or anything along those lines, please advise. Also typing pretty fast because the tea is strong.

FAX

Disclaimers: Sorry if repost.

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 09:56 PM
I've always found it curious that while Nietzsche read a lot of Emerson and was greatly influenced by him, their approaches to individuality were so divergent. Nietzsche, of course, is all about separating one's self from "the herd." But while Emerson prized individuality (read "Self-Reliance"), individuality for him was ultimately important so that one can better access the universal, or the Over-Soul. Emerson was much more democratic in his thought on individuality, something that Nietzsche left behind.

Ultra Peanut
05-15-2009, 10:01 PM
... I was just thinking about La Parka. Sorry.

Baconeater
05-15-2009, 10:02 PM
I love me some Beethoven.

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keg in kc
05-15-2009, 10:03 PM
I was just listening to krzysztof penderecki's polish requiem and benjamin britten's war requiem and contemplating the differences and similarities in the way that each piece portrays the horrors of war in the twentieth century.

Well, no, not really, I was exploring the mines of moria on my elf hunter, but tomorrow i'll do the dueling requiem things. Promise. Maybe.

cdcox
05-15-2009, 10:05 PM
I'm not sure why science should not be considered high culture. Einstein was smarter than all those folks, relatively speaking.

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 10:06 PM
I'm not sure why science should not be considered high culture. Einstein was smarter than all those folks, relatively speaking.
Shakespeare > Einstein.

luv
05-15-2009, 10:08 PM
Shakespeare > Einstein.

OOOOOOHHHHHH. I knew I liked you.

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 10:09 PM
OOOOOOHHHHHH. I knew I liked you.
I'm a writer and a future English professor, what am I supposed to say? ;)

keg in kc
05-15-2009, 10:10 PM
Einstein > Edward de Vere

Discuss Thrower
05-15-2009, 10:11 PM
This Be the Verse by Philip Larkin

They fuck you up, your mum and dad.
They may not mean to, but they do.
They fill you with the faults they had
And add some extra, just for you.

But they were fucked up in their turn
By fools in old-style hats and coats,
Who half the time were soppy-stern
And half at one another's throats.

Man hands on misery to man.
It deepens like a coastal shelf.
Get out as early as you can,
And don't have any kids yourself.

luv
05-15-2009, 10:12 PM
I'm a writer and a future English professor, what am I supposed to say? ;)

If I could go back to college, I'd major in English with an emphasis on creative writing. Probably a dream that will never come true, but it's a dream of mine nonetheless.

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:12 PM
I've always found it curious that while Nietzsche read a lot of Emerson and was greatly influenced by him, their approaches to individuality were so divergent. Nietzsche, of course, is all about separating one's self from "the herd." But while Emerson prized individuality (read "Self-Reliance"), individuality for him was ultimately important so that one can better access the universal, or the Over-Soul. Emerson was much more democratic in his thought on individuality, something that Nietzsche left behind.

That is interesting, Mr. Reaper16. It's fair to say that each of those men ultimately approached existentialism as vastly different concepts in terms of practicalism. Nietzsche's separation of man from a conceptual God certainly implies, if not outright declares, individualism whereas Emerson, as you say, preferred to think of man as uniquely separate, yet connected to God via ethereal means in a world where man exists to find and explore God whereas Nietzsche's purposes for man were self-exploratory.

FAX

Count Zarth
05-15-2009, 10:13 PM
I like to fuck.

keg in kc
05-15-2009, 10:13 PM
Nietzsche's purposes for man were self-exploratory.

FAXHow ironic, I just finished exploring myself not 15 seconds ago.

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 10:15 PM
That is interesting, Mr. Reaper16. It's fair to say that each of those men ultimately approached existentialism as vastly different concepts in terms of practicalism. Nietzsche's separation of man from a conceptual God certainly implies, if not outright declares, individualism whereas Emerson, as you say, preferred to think of man as uniquely separate, yet connected to God via ethereal means in a world where man exists to find and explore God whereas Nietzsche's purposes for man were self-exploratory.

FAX
Its a fascinating distinction between the two, given the similarity on-the-face of it. Yeah, I wrote a 20 page paper about it. :D

luv
05-15-2009, 10:15 PM
I like to fuck.

How do you know?

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 10:15 PM
How ironic, I just finished exploring myself not 15 seconds ago.
You're such an ubermensch.

Count Zarth
05-15-2009, 10:15 PM
I like to fuck my hand.

Just Passin' By
05-15-2009, 10:15 PM
Just brewed a cup of Earl Grey tea and added some lemon and honey so if anyone would like to discuss philosophy, poetry, classical music, cultural anthropology, or anything along those lines, please advise. Also typing pretty fast because the tea is strong.

FAX

Disclaimers: Sorry if repost.

Speaking of Earl Grey, have you ever tried Teavana teas? They have a large selection of teas, including Earl Grey, and they've got one called "Mrs. Earl Grey" and an Earl Grey Creme Flavored as well:

http://www.teavana.com/The-Teas/Flavored-Scented-Black-Teas/Mrs-Earl-Grey-Flavored-Black-Tea.axd

keg in kc
05-15-2009, 10:16 PM
You're such an ubermensch.You have no idea.

I did it while whistling Wagner.

Reaper16
05-15-2009, 10:19 PM
You have no idea.

I did it while whistling Wagner.
Such is the Birth of Tragedy.

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:19 PM
I love me some Beethoven.

Beethoven was a true genius, Mr. Bugeater, but ultimately a traditionalist, don't you think? Not, perhaps, as courageous as others of his contemporaries such as Mozart or even Haydn who, although also considered formal in their approach, explored highly non-contemporary compositional expression.

FAX

cdcox
05-15-2009, 10:22 PM
Beethoven was a true genius, Mr. Bugeater, but ultimately a traditionalist, don't you think? Not, perhaps, as courageous as others of his contemporaries such as Mozart or even Haydn who, although also considered formal in their approach, explored highly non-contemporary compositional expression.

FAX

Cutting the legs off your your piano had to be pretty non-contemporary in Beetoven's day, wouldn't you think?

Just Passin' By
05-15-2009, 10:24 PM
If I could go back to college, I'd major in English with an emphasis on creative writing. Probably a dream that will never come true, but it's a dream of mine nonetheless.

Don't wait for a dream that might not come true. Get yourself a copy of the Riverside Shakespeare (it's got all his works) and start with the very best. There are older versions (probably used) still available on Amazon for just over 20 bucks.

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:28 PM
Cutting the legs off your your piano had to be pretty non-contemporary in Beetoven's day, wouldn't you think?

I suppose one could make that argument, Mr. cdcox. However, compositions for prepared piano were not uncommon in Beethoven's time which implies that significant modifications to musical instruments were acceptable and considered by many to be, if not tralatitious, certainly somewhat conventional.

FAX

DaneMcCloud
05-15-2009, 10:31 PM
If I could go back to college, I'd major in English with an emphasis on creative writing. Probably a dream that will never come true, but it's a dream of mine nonetheless.

My brother did just that.

Unfortunately, he ended up as a technical writer (wrote most of the Window 98 Operating manual) and another tech book.

Things don't always turn out how you'd like...

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:34 PM
Don't wait for a dream that might not come true. Get yourself a copy of the Riverside Shakespeare (it's got all his works) and start with the very best. There are older versions (probably used) still available on Amazon for just over 20 bucks.

I might take this a step further and suggest that it is also quite possible to make your dream a reality, Ms. luv.

If returning to college and pursuing a degree in creative writing is your dream, why not do it? One can choose to continue one's education at any age - why not now? The sooner the better, in fact, and, perhaps, you will realize a more fulfilling and enjoyable life as a result? We have dreams for a reason, after all. We stumble when we don't chase them ... not when we do.

FAX

DaneMcCloud
05-15-2009, 10:34 PM
I suppose one could make that argument, Mr. cdcox. However, compositions for prepared piano were not uncommon in Beethoven's time which implies that significant modifications to musical instruments were acceptable and considered by many to be, if not tralatitious, certainly somewhat conventional.

FAX

You gotta do what you gotta do when it comes to creating music.

Eddie Van Halen not only created the first Strat with a humbucker, he cut the lower horn off of an SG before cutting the slide guitar track on Fair Warning's "Dirty Movies" so he could access notes over the neck humbucker.

Andy Johns accidentally created the flanging effect during a Led Zeppelin session by simply setting his vodka drink on the tape machine's flange.

I could go on and on and on but musical history is filled with such "blunders and compromises".

cdcox
05-15-2009, 10:38 PM
I suppose one could make that argument, Mr. cdcox. However, compositions for prepared piano were not uncommon in Beethoven's time which implies that significant modifications to musical instruments were acceptable and considered by many to be, if not tralatitious, certainly somewhat conventional.

FAX

Surely you are not overlooking Beethoven as the archetype of the mutilation school, adapted much later by Hendix and Townshend?

DaneMcCloud
05-15-2009, 10:39 PM
Surely you are not overlooking Beethoven as the archetype of the mutilation school, adapted much later by Hendix and Townshend?

Hey now.

Pete only mutilated his first Moog.

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:39 PM
We are in complete agreement, Mr. DaneMcCloud.

I, myself, once drilled a hole in the neck of a Les Paul for the purpose of holding a cigarette while performing.

FAX

DaneMcCloud
05-15-2009, 10:42 PM
We are in complete agreement, Mr. DaneMcCloud.

I, myself, once drilled a hole in the neck of a Les Paul for the purpose of holding a cigarette while performing.

FAX

I sure as hell hope it wasn't a 54-59!

Anything from 1972 to 1988 is acceptable for mutilation.

Waterlogged pieces of shit.

:D

DeezNutz
05-15-2009, 10:43 PM
Don't wait for a dream that might not come true. Get yourself a copy of the Riverside Shakespeare (it's got all his works) and start with the very best. There are older versions (probably used) still available on Amazon for just over 20 bucks.

I'd recommend the Norton Shakespeare, if one were inclined to spend the money.

But I really don't know who this Shakespeare cat is.

FAX
05-15-2009, 10:44 PM
Surely you are not overlooking Beethoven as the archetype of the mutilation school, adapted much later by Hendix and Townshend?

Your point is well made, Mr. cdcox. I concede it to you. As you mention it, it becomes clear that Beethoven did, indeed, provide a template for future generations of musicians with a desire to explore the various means whereby instrumentation could be modified in pursuit of creative ends.

We would be remiss, however, to leave Dr. Albert Hofmann's contributions out of the discussion.

FAX

Buehler445
05-15-2009, 11:01 PM
Anybody ever read Bartleby the Scrivener?

It was horribly boring, but rather profound.

SNR
05-15-2009, 11:10 PM
Beethoven was a true genius, Mr. Bugeater, but ultimately a traditionalist, don't you think? Not, perhaps, as courageous as others of his contemporaries such as Mozart or even Haydn who, although also considered formal in their approach, explored highly non-contemporary compositional expression.

FAXOur dear late (but never forgotten) friend Mr. Glenn Gould would argue differently

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Cases can be made for all three (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven) advancing compositional expression. Particularly with Haydn, since both Mozart AND Beethoven were pupils of his. What they did, however, was moreso advance the Italian school of Baroque expression established by characters such as Monteverdi in the 16th century and inject it into the large symphonic forms. Additionally, both figures played a large part in cementing those as the firm forms. Sonata-allegro 1st movements, if not previously firmly established, were certainly done with Haydn (104 symphonies will tend to influence music that way). Also, Haydn is considered by most musicologists to be the father of the string quartet in the way they were composed. Mozart and Beethoven had to be deeply inspired in their quartet compositions, especially Beethoven, who took Haydn's work and added one more step.

However, it's what Gould talks about in that video that seperates Beethoven from the lot. As he lost his hearing, he appears to also have lost his patience for established sonata-allegro forms. Beginning with middle piano sonatas in 1810, he worked in the 2-movement form, and as this Op. 109 shows (from his last 5 piano sonatas) he was nearly CONSTRICTED by what was expected from good music those days. Because he was the first composer to really be a private journeyman, and not compose under the patronage system, he was allowed to create these incredibly complex works after he had established himself in Vienna, the music capital of the world. And he appears to have done marvelously for himself.

Here are the first two movements of the Op. 109 sonata Glenn Gould discusses. You'll see it's very unconventional. Serkin's a master at his age, at any rate.

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SNR
05-15-2009, 11:16 PM
By the way, I can't thank you enough for creating this thread, FAX. I've tried starting other threads like this that have gone over like the Dresden premiere of Schumann's 2nd symphony. May this one last longer.

FAX
05-15-2009, 11:35 PM
By the way, I can't thank you enough for creating this thread, FAX. I've tried starting other threads like this that have gone over like the Dresden premiere of Schumann's 2nd symphony. May this one last longer.

You are more than welcome, Mr. SNR. Also, I look forward to reading your prior post, although it will have to be in the morning as the hour is late and there is much to be done this weekend ... or so the beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX informs me.

As for our mutual desire that this thread be successful, I think the best thing to do is to occasionally post a riddle. After all, the riddle has a distinguished literary history dating back to antiquity and, through the means of allegory or metaphor, has challenged the wit of great men from time immemorial. With that in mind, I offer ...

It's true I bring serenity,
And hang around the stars,
But yet I live in misery,
You'll find me behind bars.
With thieves and villains I consort,
In prison I'll be found,
But I would never go to court,
Unless there's more than one.

FAX

Ari Chi3fs
05-16-2009, 02:40 AM
You know how I know you guys are gay?

FAX
05-16-2009, 05:41 AM
You know how I know you guys are gay?

You need some damn culture, dude.

FAX

Baby Lee
05-16-2009, 06:28 AM
It's early, and 80% of my synapses are still asleep, but I'll throw out for dissection the structural similarities between;

The 1812 Overture,
Stairway to Heaven,
Sweet Child 'O Mine, and

Coitus.

Baby Lee
05-16-2009, 06:35 AM
It's true I bring serenity,
And hang around the stars,
But yet I live in misery,
You'll find me behind bars.
With thieves and villains I consort,
In prison I'll be found,
But I would never go to court,
Unless there's more than one.

FAX

ROFL - how weird, but if I were to guess the answer could not be found in google, . . . but with google search, it'd be right there front and center.

FAX
05-16-2009, 07:13 AM
Well, as we all know, Mr. Baby Lee, googling riddle answers ain't none too cultured.

FAX

Katipan
05-16-2009, 07:20 AM
Last night on Home Improvement Wilson told Tim Aristotle's quote about Plato being dear to him but truth being dear still.

Right after that I watched an hour long infomercial about Flirty Girl Fitness.

THAT is culture.

chief husker
05-16-2009, 07:36 AM
Siddhartha by Herman Hesse. Life changing.

Skip Towne
05-16-2009, 07:44 AM
We don't need no stinking culture.

Count Zarth
05-16-2009, 08:06 AM
Right after that I watched an hour long infomercial about Flirty Girl Fitness.

THAT is culture.

Flirty Girl Fitness sounds like an awesome place to get a blowjob.

Baby Lee
05-16-2009, 08:38 AM
Well, as we all know, Mr. Baby Lee, googling riddle answers ain't none too cultured.

FAX

FTR, and in the interest of extinguishing rumors of my cultural ignominity, I did not goggle a riddle answer, I answered the riddle through the witty implementation of a google reference.

Pablo
05-16-2009, 08:41 AM
You know how I know you guys are gay?Because they use twitter?

OnTheWarpath58
05-16-2009, 09:07 AM
That's not Mozart. It's Beethoven.

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SNR
05-16-2009, 10:31 AM
You know how I know you guys are gay?We're not uncultured cretins?

RJ
05-16-2009, 10:57 AM
If you want to get extra cultured, read Kahlil Gibran's The Prophet. You can get through the book in just a couple of hours........and yet you will be absorbing it for years. Heavy, huh?

http://books.google.com/books?id=n5BlBsFbGOQC&dq=the+prophet+kahlil+gibran&printsec=frontcover&source=bn&hl=en&ei=bu8OSu3FJKfmtgOx-6D3Ag&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4#PPP1,M1

milkman
05-16-2009, 11:49 AM
Where do Dr. Zuess and Captain Kangaroo fit into this conversation?

Jenson71
05-16-2009, 11:58 AM
I stood on Allan Ginsberg's stoop. I'm not a fan or anything, but I think it fits in here, somewhat. Moreso than a Royals thread, which I was thinking about posting it in.

Baby Lee
05-16-2009, 12:48 PM
Where do Dr. Zuess and Captain Kangaroo fit into this conversation?
??????????????

http://tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:P3OrO5yV-X7woM:http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Zeus--greek-mythology-687267_1024_768.jpg

http://markmaynard.com/media/dr-zaius2a.jpg

http://www.circusmcgurkuscasting.com/img/picture_dr_seuss.jpg

Nightfyre
05-16-2009, 02:39 PM
Mr. Fax: Tchaikovsky is always on my mind. And not his ballet/opera shit (although he wrote several long-standing ballet pieces.) 1812 Overture, March Slave, Piano Concerto #1.... ALL of these, to me, are the pinnacle of music.

Fire Me Boy!
05-16-2009, 03:07 PM
I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to Land of Confusion. In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. In Too Deep is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like In the Air Tonight and Against All Odds. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist.

Kyle DeLexus
05-16-2009, 03:10 PM
Last night on Home Improvement Wilson told Tim Aristotle's quote about Plato being dear to him but truth being dear still.

Right after that I watched an hour long infomercial about Flirty Girl Fitness.

THAT is culture.

I've often thought of putting a pole up in my apartment for when I have parties, but then I watched the King of Queens episode where Carrie is horrible at pole dancing.

Are you going to partake in said Flirty Girl Fitness?

SNR
05-16-2009, 03:45 PM
Mr. Fax: Tchaikovsky is always on my mind. And not his ballet/opera shit (although he wrote several long-standing ballet pieces.) 1812 Overture, March Slave, Piano Concerto #1.... ALL of these, to me, are the pinnacle of music.Tchaikovsky's way too weepy and emo. If you want stuff like that, listen to Rachmaninoff. It's just as good and doesn't sound make you want to kill yourself afterward.

Just my two cents, anyway. Plus, Russians really don't know anything about opera.

Reaper16
05-16-2009, 04:15 PM
Tchaikovsky's way too weepy and emo. If you want stuff like that, listen to Rachmaninoff. It's just as good and doesn't sound make you want to kill yourself afterward.

Just my two cents, anyway. Plus, Russians really don't know anything about opera.
Hey, Mr. Music Teacher. You of all people should know that Tchaikovsky has nothing to do with a subgenre of hardcore punk.

milkman
05-16-2009, 04:57 PM
??????????????

http://tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:P3OrO5yV-X7woM:http://images.fanpop.com/images/image_uploads/Zeus--greek-mythology-687267_1024_768.jpg

http://markmaynard.com/media/dr-zaius2a.jpg

http://www.circusmcgurkuscasting.com/img/picture_dr_seuss.jpg

I fucked that Seuss spelling up good, didn't I?

bdeg
05-16-2009, 05:46 PM
You are more than welcome, Mr. SNR. Also, I look forward to reading your prior post, although it will have to be in the morning as the hour is late and there is much to be done this weekend ... or so the beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX informs me.

As for our mutual desire that this thread be successful, I think the best thing to do is to occasionally post a riddle. After all, the riddle has a distinguished literary history dating back to antiquity and, through the means of allegory or metaphor, has challenged the wit of great men from time immemorial. With that in mind, I offer ...

It's true I bring serenity,
And hang around the stars,
But yet I live in misery,
You'll find me behind bars.
With thieves and villains I consort,
In prison I'll be found,
But I would never go to court,
Unless there's more than one.

FAX

the letter s

it was SO frustrating taking my laptop to work this morning to read this and then be unable to reply all day(they cut our net, so i often open a bunch of threads to have some reading material).

bdeg
05-16-2009, 05:47 PM
Hey, Mr. Music Teacher. You of all people should know that Tchaikovsky has nothing to do with a subgenre of hardcore punk.

emo is a versatile term, it can also describeanything or anyone overly emotional

SNR
05-16-2009, 05:52 PM
emo is a versatile term, it can also describeanything or anyone overly emotionalThis.

JOhn
05-16-2009, 05:57 PM
Flirty Girl Fitness sounds like an awesome place to get a blowjob.

:shake:

The virgin offering insights into sex :shake:

EyePod
05-16-2009, 07:20 PM
This is what's on my mind:

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Nightfyre
05-16-2009, 07:21 PM
Tchaikovsky's way too weepy and emo. If you want stuff like that, listen to Rachmaninoff. It's just as good and doesn't sound make you want to kill yourself afterward.

Just my two cents, anyway. Plus, Russians really don't know anything about opera.

I like Rachmaninoff and Stravinsky as well. However, the specific pieces I mentioned are not among the emo pieces. I do know that Tchaikovsky was one weepy motherfucker though. Ironically, I like 1812 the best, and he wrote it to be sarcastic.

bdeg
05-16-2009, 07:33 PM
As for our mutual desire that this thread be successful, I think the best thing to do is to occasionally post a riddle. After all, the riddle has a distinguished literary history dating back to antiquity and, through the means of allegory or metaphor, has challenged the wit of great men from time immemorial.

Indeed, Mr. Fax. let's keep this rollin

'Mystery Race'
Dwarves and giants among us
Our numbers yet untold
Though we exist in the day
At night are we most bold
You may reach for us
Yet not a one can you hold
Name to you our closest member
And you shall take the gold

Silock
05-16-2009, 07:59 PM
I've had this piece stuck in my head for weeks.

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Probably my favorite classical piece of all-time, but only when Yo-Yo Ma plays it. Everyone else plays it too quickly. They don't give you enough time to savor the melody.

Baby Lee
05-17-2009, 09:17 AM
I've had this piece stuck in my head for weeks.

Probably my favorite classical piece of all-time, but only when Yo-Yo Ma plays it. Everyone else plays it too quickly. They don't give you enough time to savor the melody.

That's a good one, but I don't think any single definable aria, solo, or set piece, can match up against Bach's Air on a G String.

It's like Johann figured out the mathematical progression to unlock the emotional centers of the brain. You find yourself powerless in it's grasp.

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Comanche
05-17-2009, 09:42 AM
Just brewed a cup of Earl Grey tea and added some lemon and honey so if anyone would like to discuss philosophy, poetry, classical music, cultural anthropology, or anything along those lines, please advise. Also typing pretty fast because the tea is strong.

FAX

Disclaimers: Sorry if repost.

The Village Blacksmith

Under a spreading chestnut-tree
The village smithy stands;
The smith, a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands.

His hair is crisp, and black, and long;
His face is like the tan;
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
He earns whate’er he can,
And looks the whole world in the face,
For he owes not any man.

Week in, week out, from morn till night,
You can hear his bellows blow;
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge,
With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell,
When the evening sun is low.

And children coming home from school
Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows roar,
And catch the burning sparks that fly
Like chaff from a threshing-floor.

He goes on Sunday to the church,
And sits among his boys;
He hears the parson pray and preach,
He hears his daughter’s voice
Singing in the village choir,
And it makes his heart rejoice.

It sounds to him like her mother’s voice
Singing in Paradise!
He needs must think of her once more,
How in the grave she lies;
And with his hard, rough hand he wipes
A tear out of his eyes.

Toiling,—rejoicing,—sorrowing,
Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
Each evening sees it close;
Something attempted, something done,
Has earned a night’s repose.

Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend.
For the lesson thou hast taught!
Thus at the flaming forge of life
Our fortunes must be wrought;
Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
Each burning deed and thought.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

Baby Lee
05-17-2009, 10:44 AM
the letter s
.
ROFL - how weird, but if I were to guess the answer could not be found in google, . . . but with google search, it'd be right there front and center.

pikesome
05-17-2009, 10:56 AM
If Plato is the topic I must confess that every time I start reading The Republic (it's not an easy book to read straight through) two things cross my mind:

1. It's hard not to agree with everything Plato writes.

2. Some of his points would make even a Fascist dictator seem liberal.

I've never finished it because it either wears me out or I start to think about how he's wrong (or right) so much that I get sidetracked.

I would run from anyone who quotes from The Republic as a concrete guide to governance but there is far too much good stuff to dismiss.

It also goes a long way to showing that many of the problems we have today have been around a long time and no one has come up with the "right" answer.

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 12:58 PM
emo is a versatile term, it can also describeanything or anyone overly emotional
Only after the commercial and mainstream viability of emo music.

But good for you picking apart a throwaway joke and looking like a jackass on two levels.

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 01:00 PM
1. It's hard not to agree with everything Plato writes.

Are you speaking solely of Plato's writings in The Republic?

pikesome
05-17-2009, 01:17 PM
Are you speaking solely of Plato's writings in The Republic?

That's all I've attempted ATM, like I said, it's a hard read.

As one would expect considering his standing he does a really good job of making things seem perfectly reasonable. Then you realize he's talking about a hereditary elite, bred for the job, ruling with a iron fist "for the good of all".

I know there's debate about what he was really advocating and how it might apply in The Real World but following some of his thoughts has to make one uncomfortable.

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:26 PM
.
ah

i read your posts before i solved it and didn't place any significance on the 2nd half of it, you win

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:28 PM
Only after the commercial and mainstream viability of emo music.

But good for you picking apart a throwaway joke and looking like a jackass on two levels.
...

ya that's what i did

i realized it was made in jest, but i thought your point was serious. and i disagree with it

out of curiosity, what 2 levels?

kysirsoze
05-17-2009, 01:34 PM
Indeed, Mr. Fax. let's keep this rollin

'Mystery Race'
Dwarves and giants among us
Our numbers yet untold
Though we exist in the day
At night are we most bold
You may reach for us
Yet not a one can you hold
Name to you our closest member
And you shall take the gold

Not sure if you're looking for stars or the sun.

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:34 PM
the last 2 lines make the answer 'the sun' (or sol)

good job

kysirsoze
05-17-2009, 01:36 PM
the last 2 lines make the answer 'the sun' (or sol)

good job

That's what I thought but I was covering my ass.:D

RedNeckRaider
05-17-2009, 01:37 PM
Well you can most likely surmise by my nickname that I have spent I have very little time studying the arts. I am unimpressed with Picasso and see his paintings much as the finger paintings my wife used to put on the fridge when my kids were very young a did them in school.

Monet was better but looking at that work I always felt like someone who needed glasses because it was some what blurry. Shakespeare just flat talked funny and was about as fun as reading the Bible to me. Strangely I do like classical music. I do offer up this poem and melody as it is very enjoyable to me. Orson Wells is easy to listen to as is the music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZyNKrYo9I4&feature=related

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 01:40 PM
...

ya that's what i did

i realized it was made in jest, but i thought your point was serious. and i disagree with it

out of curiosity, what 2 levels?
Well, what I said was true. But I knew that SNR was using the slang definition, too.

In my last post that you quoted is the explanation for why you shouldn't disagree. The slang usage directly came from the when the musical subgenre became popular.

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 01:41 PM
Well you can most likely surmise by my nickname that I have spent I have very little time studying the arts. I am unimpressed with Picasso and see his paintings much as the finger paintings my wife used to put on the fridge when my kids were very young a did them in school.

Monet was better but looking at that work I always felt like someone who needed glasses because it was some what blurry. Shakespeare just flat talked funny and was about as fun as reading the Bible to me.
You are a savage monster not fit to be called human. I detest you and all that you stand for.

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:45 PM
Well, what I said was true. But I knew that SNR was using the slang definition, too.

In my last post that you quoted is the explanation for why you shouldn't disagree. The slang usage directly came from the when the musical subgenre became popular.

it wasn't apparent you knew of the slang, or at least how common it is
i wasn't trying to be a jackass and will ask again, on what 2 levels was i one?

Dr. Facebook Fever
05-17-2009, 01:46 PM
If I could go back to college, I'd major in English with an emphasis on creative writing. Probably a dream that will never come true, but it's a dream of mine nonetheless.

I was an English major, creative writing minor. So I do radio as a career.

SNR
05-17-2009, 01:46 PM
Well you can most likely surmise by my nickname that I have spent I have very little time studying the arts. I am unimpressed with Picasso and see his paintings much as the finger paintings my wife used to put on the fridge when my kids were very young a did them in school.

Monet was better but looking at that work I always felt like someone who needed glasses because it was some what blurry. Shakespeare just flat talked funny and was about as fun as reading the Bible to me. Strangely I do like classical music. I do offer up this poem and melody as it is very enjoyable to me. Orson Wells is easy to listen to as is the music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZyNKrYo9I4&feature=relatedAh, so you're a minimalist. Gotcha.

RedNeckRaider
05-17-2009, 01:47 PM
Ah, so you're a minimalist. Gotcha.

I look that up and find out what the heck it means and get back with you :)

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 01:48 PM
it wasn't apparent you knew of the slang, or at least how common it is
i wasn't trying to be a jackass and will ask again, on what 2 levels was i one?
Yes, because I'm not a living, breathing entity. Who isn't aware of the slang usage?

The two levels:
1.) You were picking apart a silly throwaway joke. I mean, who nitpicks a throwaway joke? (I understand now that you weren't actually doing this. You didn't realize it was a joke because you apparently assume that I was mentally retarded).

2.) Despite the nit-picking, you were kind of wrong anyway.

I'm sorry. You weren't being a jackass. You were instead being a dullard for thinking that I, of all people, was a dummy.

RedNeckRaider
05-17-2009, 01:49 PM
You are a savage monster not fit to be called human. I detest you and all that you stand for.

Ok I am a Raiders fan....oh you were talking about my post....

SNR
05-17-2009, 01:50 PM
Yes, because I'm not a living, breathing entity. Who isn't aware of the slang usage?

The two levels:
1.) You were picking apart a silly throwaway joke. I mean, who nitpicks a throwaway joke? (I understand now that you weren't actually doing this. You didn't realize it was a joke because you apparently assume that I was mentally retarded).

2.) Despite the nit-picking, you were kind of wrong anyway.

I'm sorry. You weren't being a jackass. You were instead being a dullard for thinking that I, of all people, was a dummy.You're a dummy.

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:51 PM
Yes, because I'm not a living, breathing entity. Who isn't aware of the slang usage?

The two levels:
1.) You were picking apart a silly throwaway joke. I mean, who nitpicks a throwaway joke? (I understand now that you weren't actually doing this. You didn't realize it was a joke because you apparently assume that I was mentally retarded).

2.) Despite the nit-picking, you were kind of wrong anyway.

I'm sorry. You weren't being a jackass. You were instead being a dullard for thinking that I, of all people, was a dummy.
i dont know you dude
i know there are some stupid people out there, and some that would make an argument or a fight out of the definition of emo

i can only assume you know what you appear to know, and you appeared to be close-minded on the subject of 'emo'

also don't get how i was 'kind of wrong'

bdeg
05-17-2009, 01:52 PM
in the future i will assume that everyone knows everything i know?

how's this supposed to work, again?

Reaper16
05-17-2009, 01:53 PM
in the future i will assume that everyone knows everything i know?

how's this supposed to work, again?
No, you should just assume that I know everything there there is to know. ;)

BucEyedPea
05-17-2009, 03:54 PM
I like to ****.

You have no thoughts on Timaeus?

Jenson71
07-27-2009, 11:06 AM
Einstein loved Mozart and Bach but didn't like Beethoven. I like Mozart's 40 and 41 Symphonies, but I've never heard a thing of Bach's.

tooge
07-27-2009, 01:13 PM
Einstein loved Mozart and Bach but didn't like Beethoven. I like Mozart's 40 and 41 Symphonies, but I've never heard a thing of Bach's.

That cat Shultz from Peanuts is better than all those clowns.

SNR
08-31-2010, 10:06 PM
I just got back from a soiree/recital featuring some piano theme and variation works by Schubert, Sessions, and John Harbison.

Well, guess who made a surprise visit? John Harbison. Heh. I was able to corner him into sitting down at my table and we had a glass of wine or two together. Nice guy. Knows more about music theory and philosophy and combining the two than any artist/musician I've ever encountered.

Not to name drop or anything... :D

Rain Man
08-31-2010, 10:21 PM
I was an English major, creative writing minor. So I do radio as a career.


My god. Are you THE Dr. Johnny Fever?

Rain Man
08-31-2010, 10:24 PM
On a cultural note, if I could be really, really good at one musical instrument, it would be the piano. I'd like to be really, really good at the violin, but you don't often spontaneously find violins at parties, and I have a dream that if I was really, really good at the piano I'd be at parties and start playing and everyone would think I was really cool and interesting and they'd all hang around the piano and listen to me and stuff.

Count Zarth
08-31-2010, 10:35 PM
Allow me to contribute

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blaise
08-31-2010, 10:43 PM
On a cultural note, if I could be really, really good at one musical instrument, it would be the piano. I'd like to be really, really good at the violin, but you don't often spontaneously find violins at parties, and I have a dream that if I was really, really good at the piano I'd be at parties and start playing and everyone would think I was really cool and interesting and they'd all hang around the piano and listen to me and stuff.

The piano would definitely be cool for that, but I'd go with the trumpet and try and be like Miles Davis. It's just so damn cool.