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Saccopoo
05-23-2009, 10:00 AM
As BBQ season is once again upon us, I thought I might get back into the real KC tradition of cooking and start smoking a lot more this year. Got a Weber Smokey Mountain smoker (along with a standard Weber kettle and a Genesis propane grill) that I plan on using as the primary implement of destruction. I was even thinking about entering some BBQ contests this year once I got my stuff together, which leads me to a couple of questions that I'd like to pose to you fine folk:

1. Anyone here do the BBQ competition thing? I was going to start small and enter as/in the "Backyard." Any pointers in terms of setup at the events such as items I might need/would want to bring outside of the obvious?

2. Based on my experiences of living in Kansas City for a number of years, I am partial to the longer smoking, lighter rub, heavy sweet sauce that typically defines KC style BBQ. However, I have always personally preferred beef ribs to the pork variety, and as such have usually made that my focus for BBQ in this manner doing very little pork. The competitions around here (Western mountain states) basically require pork and chicken for these competitions, with an obligatory "Wild Game" section. (Schools close in these here parts for the opening day of deer season.) Should I spend this next summer working on a dedicated pork only rub and sauce, or will my time tested, tried and true beef concoctions be sufficient?

3. In this homogenous global society we now live in, has anyone begun to incorporate the various regional styles of BBQ into their routines? (Memphis versus KC in particular.) I've always been a purist and do one or the other, making sure that people know that I've just prepared a mean to one specific style. Would it be considered sacrilege to consider using a mop sauce a la Memphis style then employ a molasses based KC sauce at the end, or other such things?

If you want to share any special methods or secrets to creating a great BBQ, please do so. Let's get the grills and smokers fired up and get it going! Heck, tailgating season is darn near upon us!

Pioli Zombie
05-23-2009, 10:03 AM
I want sex.
Posted via Mobile Device

stumppy
05-23-2009, 10:14 AM
About the only wild game I've smoked is venison and pheasant. I usually just prepare and smoke the venison like I would a tri-point . With pheasant I like to use the same spices I do on chicken the I stuff it with chopped onion, celery, and apples. Wrap it up with bacon and smoke it between 4 to 6 hours. Killer stuff.

Oh yea, around here any and every discussion about BBQ and smoking is 'serious'.:D

Stewie
05-23-2009, 10:15 AM
I'm on a competitive BBQ team and my first advice if you want to compete is make a list of all things you need, or do a competition close to your house, or have cash on hand. You will inevitably forget/need all kinds of equipment, spices, utensils, etc.

As for how to prepare BBQ for competitions, what you and your buddies think is awesome Q probably won't do well in a competition. You're being judged by all sorts of palates. The middle of the road is the high road.

Beef ribs are not normally part of a BBQ competition if it's a sanctioned event (or you live in Texas, I suppose). There are the four standard meats: pork ribs, pork butt/shoulder, chicken, brisket. There are usually a couple of other non-sanctioned events at most contests like sausage, or hot wings, or something a little different from the official meats.

Take a judging class. You'll get a better idea what the judges are looking for.

But most of all, have fun. BBQ competitions are a blast whether you finish in the Top 10 or dead last.

Pioli Zombie
05-23-2009, 10:20 AM
FRANKS AND BEANSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted via Mobile Device

Fire Me Boy!
05-23-2009, 10:27 AM
Even down here, sweet sauce wins.

And Carolinians don't know crap about BBQ. The best of the best around here are pretty mediocre on my palate. Having judged in KC and now down here in SC, I've seriously had some of the best SC has to offer, and it just ain't that good.

I have a sneaking suspicion it's the same in SLC. If you're not in or near one of the "meccas" of BBQ, you're going to find all kinds, and I suspect that not much of it is really going to be good.

Saccopoo
05-23-2009, 10:27 AM
FRANKS AND BEANSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted via Mobile Device

Don't make me kill you for trying to highjack a serious and legitimate thread of great importance.

Chaunceythe3rd
05-23-2009, 11:11 AM
You aren't serious about smoking or BBQ if you shy away from pork. You might want to try making jerky. That is a good use for beef.

Saccopoo
05-23-2009, 11:23 AM
Even down here, sweet sauce wins.

And Carolinians don't know crap about BBQ. The best of the best around here are pretty mediocre on my palate. Having judged in KC and now down here in SC, I've seriously had some of the best SC has to offer, and it just ain't that good.

I have a sneaking suspicion it's the same in SLC. If you're not in or near one of the "meccas" of BBQ, you're going to find all kinds, and I suspect that not much of it is really going to be good.

I really like the traditional mustard and vinegar South Carolina sauces, but yeah, it's not like the Rockies are the mecca of BBQ by any stretch. Most places seem to follow a Memphis style versus a KC style, and that's why I was thinking about getting a little more involved from a competition perspective.

Also, as an additional question, should I stick with Baby Backs versus shorts or the like on the pork ribs? Sometimes going beyond the norm can bring a little attention, versus just heading down the same road as everyone else.

Mojo Jojo
05-23-2009, 11:46 AM
I was on a team, but once the kids came along that dream has been put on hold. However, I still smoke all the time to keep up the skills.

1. Get a good/great grill/smoker that you are willing to keep several years. You will need to learn everything about it. How it cooks in the sun, clouds, rain, hot, cold etc. Knowing how your grill/smoker behaves is the first and foremost thing to making your items come out the same way every time. It will cost more money, but if you are serious about this your invest will pay off.

2. You and any team members NEED to take a K.C. BBQ Society certified judging class. This gives you great insight into what the judges are looking for. Once our team took the class we made a few changes and scores went up.

3. Sauce will not win you a contest. In fact many times sauce will cost you points. Sauce should be very light or better yet served on the side. Judges judge meat and taste. They view sauce as covering up mistakes. Tip learned from the judging class. However; sauce can help you in the "people choice" awards.

4. Don't worry too much about styles. Good BBQ is good BBQ the style is just a delivery system. Find things that you, your teammates, family and friends like. Then tweak from there. Make friends or get to know one or two certified judges and pay them to give you an independent evaluation based on their experiences. You can never have too much practice.

5. NEVER be afraid to ask questions of fellow smokers. We are tight and love to share stories. After all the final goal is the same for all of us....GREAT BBQ!!!!!

Raised On Riots
05-23-2009, 11:47 AM
You aren't serious about smoking or BBQ if you shy away from pork. You might want to try making jerky. That is a good use for beef.

Pork is for crackers who drink vinegar and have no taste buds.:)

Pablo
05-23-2009, 11:54 AM
Use lots of KC Masterpiece (sauce of the Gods).

luv
05-23-2009, 11:55 AM
Pork is for crackers who drink vinegar and have no taste buds.:)

Depends on how you season it and cook it.

Raised On Riots
05-23-2009, 11:59 AM
Use lots of KC Masterpiece on your french fries.

;)

HolyHandgernade
05-23-2009, 12:11 PM
3. In this homogenous global society we now live in, has anyone begun to incorporate the various regional styles of BBQ into their routines? (Memphis versus KC in particular.) I've always been a purist and do one or the other, making sure that people know that I've just prepared a mean to one specific style. Would it be considered sacrilege to consider using a mop sauce a la Memphis style then employ a molasses based KC sauce at the end, or other such things?

When I moved out to Cali, there were no good BBQ places so I had to learn smoking for myself. I'm usually constrained for time, so I've become partial to smoking tri-tip as it greatly reduces the time. I like to throw a salmon in with it for an appetiser. Fantastic!

I've also smoked ribs one time with cherry wood and served it with cherry dressing that had a little Asian flavor to it. Surprisingly good. Mmmmm, I miss KC!

-HH

RJ
05-23-2009, 12:48 PM
Here is a basic method for grilling chicken that I find pretty much fool proof. For those who grill often this is nothing new, but I know there are a number of CP members who are beginner cooks. This isn't a recipe, it's a system. I do this on a Weber kettle shaped charcoal grill but it will work on any equipment.

Cut a whole chicken (about 3.5 lbs) in half lengthwise, removing the backbone, or buy a couple of split broilers. Season the chicken. Doesn't matter how. BBQ rub, , Asian, Mexican or just S&P.....whatever you're in the mood for will work. You can do this 30 minutes before cooking, or the day before.

I like to use wood chips with my charcoal. Again, doesn't matter what kind. Soak them in cold water for 30-60 minutes before using.

When it's time to cook, fill a chimney starter with charcoal and let it burn until all the coals are ashed over. Pour the charcoal into the kettle, half on each side, leaving the center empty. Put the lid on the grill and let the coals cool down a bit, probably about 10 minutes.

Lay your chicken halves, cut side down, directly over the hot coals, one on each side. Put the lid back on and let them cook just long enough to develop a nice color, about 5 minutes per side. Depends on how hot the coals are.

Move the chicken into the center of the grill (indirect heat). Add your wood chips to the charcoal (yes, drain them first), close the lid and walk away. Drink a beer or watch one inning of baseball or both. Go back in about 20 minutes and turn the chicken. Drink another beer or watch another inning of baseball or both. After another 20 minutes, baste the chicken with whatever you like; bbq sauce, Italian dressing, apple juice.....doesn't matter. Lastly, if the skin doesn't look crispy, move the chicken halves back over the coals. That will probably be your last step. When it's done, the leg half will pull easily away from the breast half.

What I like about this method is that it eliminates the problem of different size pieces being done at different times. Also, using halves and indirect heat I've never had the breasts dry out on me.

Hope this helps someone this summer.

Pioli Zombie
05-23-2009, 12:50 PM
He said breasts. Tee hee
Posted via Mobile Device

RJ
05-23-2009, 12:57 PM
For those who aren't lucky enough to have quality smoking wood nearby (like me, for instance) I've had good luck with this company. They have good selection and their prices are low compared to other online shops. Basically, they don't gouge you on the shipping costs.


http://www.smokinlicious.com/index.php?The%20Basics%20of%20Smoking

Fire Me Boy!
05-23-2009, 01:21 PM
I really like the traditional mustard and vinegar South Carolina sauces, but yeah, it's not like the Rockies are the mecca of BBQ by any stretch. Most places seem to follow a Memphis style versus a KC style, and that's why I was thinking about getting a little more involved from a competition perspective.

Also, as an additional question, should I stick with Baby Backs versus shorts or the like on the pork ribs? Sometimes going beyond the norm can bring a little attention, versus just heading down the same road as everyone else.

Personally, if you're doing ribs I'd go for St. Louis cut spare ribs. More meat to bone ratio than baby backs.

damaticous
05-23-2009, 03:22 PM
I'm on a competitive BBQ team and my first advice if you want to compete is make a list of all things you need, or do a competition close to your house, or have cash on hand. You will inevitably forget/need all kinds of equipment, spices, utensils, etc.

As for how to prepare BBQ for competitions, what you and your buddies think is awesome Q probably won't do well in a competition. You're being judged by all sorts of palates. The middle of the road is the high road.

Beef ribs are not normally part of a BBQ competition if it's a sanctioned event (or you live in Texas, I suppose). There are the four standard meats: pork ribs, pork butt/shoulder, chicken, brisket. There are usually a couple of other non-sanctioned events at most contests like sausage, or hot wings, or something a little different from the official meats.

Take a judging class. You'll get a better idea what the judges are looking for.

But most of all, have fun. BBQ competitions are a blast whether you finish in the Top 10 or dead last.

Great Advice!!!!

I've only competed once. did Horrible!!! I came in second to last place and that was only because the last place team didn't show up. ROFL

Anyway, I wanted to see what a competition was all about. it's very light hearted, fun, and extremely interesting.

It's really neat seeing everyone's rigs and how they smoke the meet and with what wood. It's also interesting, and kind of weird, meeting people that are so competitive in the art of true BBQing.

If competing in a KCBS competition you'll do best by doing KC BBQ...lots of sweet as opposed to Memphis, North Carolina or Texas BBQ.

If you want to get into it and compete seriously then take a judging class (as mentioned above). It'll help you to know how and why the judges judge the way they do.

Personally I did it for the fun. It was extremely hard for me since I was the only one in my team that was able to show. Setup, prepare, cook, prepare again....it's very tough to do by yourself.

But it's a blast! You will meet so many interesting and fun people, and everyone has a great time at a contest.

The best advice I can give you from my limited experience is...

1. take money, like stated before, you'll end up forgetting something.
2. make sure you take something comfy to sleep on...that is if you can get to sleep at all. it gets hard to sleep when everyone is up talking and partying all night.
3. DON'T do it all by yourself! it may seem like it's the same ol stuff you do at home on the weekends, but the more the easier...and merrier.
4. Have fun. That's what it is all about!

Halfcan
05-23-2009, 03:24 PM
there are a lot of meat smokers on here

Chaunceythe3rd
05-23-2009, 05:13 PM
Pork is for crackers who drink vinegar and have no taste buds.:)

Shows you don't know anything about crackers. We mix the vinegar with pickle juice and Jack Daniels.

milkman
05-23-2009, 06:20 PM
When I moved out to Cali, there were no good BBQ places so I had to learn smoking for myself. I'm usually constrained for time, so I've become partial to smoking tri-tip as it greatly reduces the time. I like to throw a salmon in with it for an appetiser. Fantastic!

I've also smoked ribs one time with cherry wood and served it with cherry dressing that had a little Asian flavor to it. Surprisingly good. Mmmmm, I miss KC!

-HH

So, do you have any good ideas for seasoning and prep to BBQ Tri-Tip?

milkman
05-23-2009, 06:21 PM
For those who aren't lucky enough to have quality smoking wood nearby (like me, for instance) I've had good luck with this company. They have good selection and their prices are low compared to other online shops. Basically, they don't gouge you on the shipping costs.


http://www.smokinlicious.com/index.php?The%20Basics%20of%20Smoking

I'm thinking of doing some skinless chicken breasts on the BBQ.

Any ideas on ways to keep them from getting dry?

milkman
05-23-2009, 06:30 PM
Another question.

What is this "rub" you guys keep referring to?

milkman
05-23-2009, 07:11 PM
While we're at it, any good home made Chil recipes out there?

Baconeater
05-23-2009, 07:15 PM
Another question.

What is this "rub" you guys keep referring to?
It's just a mix of seasonings you rub on to the meat prior to cooking.

While we're at it, any good home made Chil recipes out there?
Talk to sedated, he made some killer chili for Joe's draft party.

RJ
05-23-2009, 07:21 PM
I'm thinking of doing some skinless chicken breasts on the BBQ.

Any ideas on ways to keep them from getting dry?


Boneless skinless or just skinless?

The bone is helpful in keeping chicken juicy.

If you don't want skin, can you use thighs? Boneless, skinless thighs are great for grilling as the dark meat won't dry out so easily.

Do you have a particular recipe in mind?

milkman
05-23-2009, 07:25 PM
Boneless skinless or just skinless?

The bone is helpful in keeping chicken juicy.

If you don't want skin, can you use thighs? Boneless, skinless thighs are great for grilling as the dark meat won't dry out so easily.

Do you have a particular recipe in mind?

Boneless, and no, no recipe in mind.

My wife just likes boneless chicken breasts, and she marinates them in a a green salsa and taco seasoning mix and bakes it.

But I'd like to try to BBQ some.

milkman
05-23-2009, 09:04 PM
Bumpd for more answers.

HolyHandgernade
05-23-2009, 09:29 PM
So, do you have any good ideas for seasoning and prep to BBQ Tri-Tip?

We do a sweet dry rub the evening before. Honestly, my wife has perfected the rub, she has an incredible palate. The thing is, she does things according to taste, has no recipe for it written down. I'll see if she can give away any of her secrets. My daughter hates BBQ, but she loves our tri-tip, we gets lots of compliments on it, but the BBQ market isn't exactly cornered out here!

We smoke 200-220 degrees for between 3 and 4 hours depending on the amount of fat. The salmon only takes about an hour and smoking it with the tri-tip (we use hickory predominantly) gives it an incredible flavor we sort of discovered on accident trying to save time!

I have a meat slicer, and we like to shave it for serving in a chaffing dish. It tends to get picked over by passer-byes during that process.

-HH

HolyHandgernade
05-23-2009, 09:38 PM
OK, I gave her a call, she said she mixes it up depending on what she has on hand and doesn't have anything written down, but generally:

Sugar and salt, about a 2:1 ratio

crushed black pepper or a cayenne/chili powder

onion salt or celery salt

herb greens such as thyme, savory or marjorman, but never basil or parsley

Hope that helps.

Saccopoo
05-25-2009, 05:33 PM
Another question.

What is this "rub" you guys keep referring to?

The rub is a dry seasoning "marinate" that is applied to the meat prior to cooking/smoking. In a KC style BBQ, there is sugar/brown sugar used in it along with various spices. (I like using a combination of paprika, chili powder, cayenne chili powder, onion powder, garlic powder, crushed/ground black pepper, salt and dry mustard when "rubbing" pork and beef. Chicken gets a sugarless rub of paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, thyme, sage, black pepper, salt, cayenne, allspice and cinnamon.) This forms a flavorful crust on the meat during the cooking process.

A memphis style BBQ will employ a "mop" sauce during the cooking procedure, which is primarily a vinegar based concoction to keep the meat moist. KC style smokes it dry, but then in the final phase of cooking, adds a molasses/sugar based sauce. (Memphis style ribs are served "dry" or sauceless.)

Saccopoo
05-25-2009, 05:40 PM
While we're at it, any good home made Chil recipes out there?

Yes, and I would assume that everyone's recipe is completely "top secret" like I consider mine to be.

My specialty is "Goat Head #15." Fifteen designating the number of different beans (yes, I said beans - I don't live in Texas, and don't give a shit about the beanless hamburger soup that they call "chili" down there), chilis and meats that I employ in my chili; i.e. - five different varieties of each. I use Vidallia onions exclusively, employ some "exotic" ingredients such as mole and galanga, and use only fresh tomatoes. And lamb is one of the meats I use.

Fire Me Boy!
05-25-2009, 06:40 PM
Yes, and I would assume that everyone's recipe is completely "top secret" like I consider mine to be.

My specialty is "Goat Head #15." Fifteen designating the number of different beans (yes, I said beans - I don't live in Texas, and don't give a shit about the beanless hamburger soup that they call "chili" down there), chilis and meats that I employ in my chili; i.e. - five different varieties of each. I use Vidallia onions exclusively, employ some "exotic" ingredients such as mole and galanga, and use only fresh tomatoes. And lamb is one of the meats I use.

In my humble opinion, the meat does little but add texture. Chili was originally invented to cover up the flavor or rancid meat. The spices are so strong, the flavor of the meat is not there.

Now the combination of spices is HUGE.

I'd also add, that any chili will be 5X better if you use a homemade chili powder. Try Alton Brown's homemade chili powder - the flavor is such that you'll never want to buy a pre-made powder again.

And yes... my recipe is also top secret, using venison typically, but beef will also work. Again, I've tried my chili with a number of different meats raning from venison to pork to turkey to chicken to beef to lamb to veal and changing the meat make only a very subtle difference from one to the other.

I also use beans, but not a ton. Usually two different types, both lending a different flavor and texture to the finished product.

A good place to start for chili recipes is online. Make a bunch of different ones over a period of time, taking notes about what you like and what you don't. Find the one you like the best then start experimenting with things like different types of peppers, chilies, and other spices. For instance, just about any chili recipe I make I always sub dried chipotle chili powder instead of cayenne. Just a flavor switch that I personally really enjoy.

BigRedChief
05-25-2009, 06:44 PM
I bought myself a cheater electric smoker. Very happy with my choice.

Get some rub and slow cook/smoke the meat with ease.

Look up the thread that I asked about it. Many good recipies in there.

cdcox
05-25-2009, 07:25 PM
While we're at it, any good home made Chil recipes out there?

I don't really consider my chili recipe to be secret, but I make it by eyeball and taste so I can't really write it down. I consider it to be a very basic recipe since it can be ready to eat within an hour of when you start. I usually make a big batch, eat on it for a few days and freeze the left overs.

Here's your shopping list:

1 large fresh onion

cooking oil

2 lb hamburger

several cans of chilli beans

several cans of tomato sauce

jalapeno's from a jar, or a can of chipolte peppers (this will make it spicier)

spices listed in approximately descending order of quantity added: chili powder, cumin, oregano, freshly ground black pepper, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, hot sauce.

about a teaspoon of sugar

Here is the method:

1) chop the onion and saute in oil over medium heat for 5 minutes or so

2) add the hamburger and brown. Drain any excess fat.

3) add beans until the bean/meat ratio looks good to you. The sauce from the chili beans adds a little chili flavor. If I were to use red, pinto, or black beans I'd rinse them first.

4) add tomato sauce until it looks and tastes right to you. I typically add about the same amount of tomato sauce as I added beans.

5) add the seasonings. Chop the jalapeno or chipolte peppers before you add them. This is going to be a preference thing, depending on how hot you like it. Start on the low side, you can always add more later. You also should realize that the seasonings get stronger as the chili cooks and even as it sits in the fridge. The sugar helps blend the spices

6) simmer for at least a half an hour,

StcChief
05-25-2009, 07:32 PM
I want sex.
Posted via Mobile Devicespoken like every "TRUE" male. UP not included.

Fire Me Boy!
05-25-2009, 07:32 PM
Tomato sauce shouldn't be near a good chili. :harumph:

Good call on the chipotle. I'm a huge fan of chipotle... great flavor, especially for a chili.

Jilly
05-25-2009, 07:40 PM
I have to admit, this thread is a total turn on

cdcox
05-25-2009, 07:41 PM
Tomato sauce shouldn't be near a good chili. :harumph:

Good call on the chipotle. I'm a huge fan of chipotle... great flavor, especially for a chili.

Truthfully, I've been making some variation of that chili recipe since college, way before I got interested in cooking. It would be interesting to approach it with a clean slate (maybe then I'd give up the tomato sauce), but my wife hates it when I experiment with some food she already likes.

Fire Me Boy!
05-25-2009, 07:42 PM
I have to admit, this thread is a total turn on

Pics. Pics or get out. :harumph:

Jilly
05-25-2009, 07:45 PM
Pics. Pics or get out. :harumph:

Not until I get a taste of this meat of which you all speak

2bikemike
05-25-2009, 08:07 PM
Here is a Website I use to answer smoking questions. Have any of you ever smoked a fattie or some ABT's?


http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/index.php?

Saccopoo
05-25-2009, 08:09 PM
Here is a Website I use to answer smoking questions. Have any of you ever smoked a fattie or some ABT's?


http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/index.php?

I will plead the fifth on that...

RJ
05-25-2009, 08:57 PM
Here is a Website I use to answer smoking questions. Have any of you ever smoked a fattie or some ABT's?


http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/index.php?


Looks like a good place. Thank you.

KCChiefsMan
05-25-2009, 09:39 PM
will I get shot if I told you that I much prefer vinegar base BBQ sauce over anything?

BigRedChief
05-25-2009, 09:42 PM
Pics. Pics or get out. :harumph:
http://images.craveonline.com/article_imgs/Image/bbq_sauce.jpg

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 05:17 AM
http://images.craveonline.com/article_imgs/Image/bbq_sauce.jpg

Ooohhh yeah.....

http://www.moviecritic.com.au/images/jizz-in-my-pants-andy-samberg.jpg

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 05:18 AM
will I get shot if I told you that I much prefer vinegar base BBQ sauce over anything?

No. But you'll get laughed at.

tooge
05-26-2009, 08:01 AM
I'm also on a comp team. Pretty much agree with Stewie. Just dont focus on winning. Have fun. You can go nuts trying to please judges all the time. Do a small comp first, 20 t0 30 teams locally just to get a feel for it before you spend a ton of money. Here are a few pics fr4om one of our comps a couple of years ago. If I recall these all truned out fairly well. Anyhow, check out the bbqforum.com site. Lots of good info there. Good luck./

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 08:04 AM
I'm also on a comp team. Pretty much agree with Stewie. Just dont focus on winning. Have fun. You can go nuts trying to please judges all the time. Do a small comp first, 20 t0 30 teams locally just to get a feel for it before you spend a ton of money. Here are a few pics fr4om one of our comps a couple of years ago. If I recall these all truned out fairly well. Anyhow, check out the bbqforum.com site. Lots of good info there. Good luck./

One thing I actually LIKE about the SC BBQ Association: They just don't care about the greenery. They specifically say leave the garnish off. We're not judging parsley and lettuce, we're judging barbecue. Give us the barbecue. They also say don't give us sauce on the side - give it to us how you want us to judge it. Sauce can make a huge difference in flavor, and you want all judges judging the same product.

HemiEd
05-26-2009, 09:29 AM
Personally, if you're doing ribs I'd go for St. Louis cut spare ribs. More meat to bone ratio than baby backs.

I opened this thread to ask this very question. I purchased some ribs on Saturday, and they were labeled "St. Louis style" and I had never noticed that on a label before.

MOhillbilly
05-26-2009, 09:38 AM
good sauce. kinda thin but still has enough depth that ill buy it again.

http://www.hotsauce.com/Bourbon-Q-Gold-Reserve-Bourbon-BBQ-p/3453bq.htm


Edit- ps-"As BBQ season is once again upon us"

LOL!!

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 09:43 AM
I opened this thread to ask this very question. I purchased some ribs on Saturday, and they were labeled "St. Louis style" and I had never noticed that on a label before.

A full spare rib has some cartilage on one end... very meaty, but it makes slicing the ribs into recognizable ribs a bit on the difficult side. St. Louis style means they've cut that portion off. It's called the brisket bone and/or "rib tips," and the result is a spare rib that looks more like a large baby back rib - more rectangular in shape.

Personally, I always buy the whole thing and trim it myself, or have the butcher trim it and give me all of it. It's cheaper to buy the whole thing, and the tips they trim off are very tasty. I just go ahead and rub them with the rest of the rib and cook at the same time. I just like the presentation of the St. Louis cut better.

HemiEd
05-26-2009, 09:50 AM
A full spare rib has some cartilage on one end... very meaty, but it makes slicing the ribs into recognizable ribs a bit on the difficult side. St. Louis style means they've cut that portion off. It's called the brisket bone, and the result is a spare rib that looks more like a large baby back rib.

Personally, I always buy the whole thing and trim it myself, or have the butcher trim it and give me all of it. It's cheaper to buy the whole thing, and the tips they trim off are very tasty. I just go ahead and rub them with the rest of the rib and cook at the same time. I just like the presentation of the St. Louis cut better.

Thanks, usually I buy them at Sam's or Costco and they are complete. Target is the only place I can find fresh, never frozen turkeys around here, so I always check out their meat. They had these and baby backs, but all of their other pork was pre-seasoned, highly processed stuff.

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 09:55 AM
Thanks, usually I buy them at Sam's or Costco and they are complete. Target is the only place I can find fresh, never frozen turkeys around here, so I always check out their meat. They had these and baby backs, but all of their other pork was pre-seasoned, highly processed stuff.

Buy them whole, get a sharp knife and cut it off yourself. Here's a good how-to: http://www.bbq-book.com/news2006/html/october_2006.html

2bikemike
05-26-2009, 10:00 AM
A full spare rib has some cartilage on one end... very meaty, but it makes slicing the ribs into recognizable ribs a bit on the difficult side. St. Louis style means they've cut that portion off. It's called the brisket bone and/or "rib tips," and the result is a spare rib that looks more like a large baby back rib - more rectangular in shape.

Personally, I always buy the whole thing and trim it myself, or have the butcher trim it and give me all of it. It's cheaper to buy the whole thing, and the tips they trim off are very tasty. I just go ahead and rub them with the rest of the rib and cook at the same time. I just like the presentation of the St. Louis cut better.

They also cook much better when trimmed St. Louis style. The excess is great for beans and stuff like that.

Mojo Jojo
05-26-2009, 10:07 AM
will I get shot if I told you that I much prefer vinegar base BBQ sauce over anything?

If you like it that is what BBQ is all about. Different tastes. I'm from KC, but I like a vinegar sauce on pulled pork. Those flavors just go together. Does anyone here like mustard based sauces? I don't, and I like mustard. Once while in Denver I had a "White BBQ Sauce". It was used on chicken and turkey, and I was told it was a regional thing. I think it was a waste of smoked meat. Has anyone else had this, and what are you thoughts?

2bikemike
05-26-2009, 10:09 AM
Buy them whole, get a sharp knife and cut it off yourself. Here's a good how-to: http://www.bbq-book.com/news2006/html/october_2006.html

And if you prefer a Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 10:09 AM
They also cook much better when trimmed St. Louis style. The excess is great for beans and stuff like that.

I've never had any problems cooking them whole, but I just prefer it trimmed.

And 2bikemike is 100 percent correct. The tips and skirt meat is perfect for beans.

Mojo Jojo
05-26-2009, 10:13 AM
[QUOTE=Fire Me Boy!;5792849]... I just prefer it trimmed.


So true. And the same for the ribs.

RJ
05-26-2009, 10:15 AM
Anybody have a favorite rub recipe?

Mine changes with every batch, which of course is part of the fun, but on the other hand maybe I should perfect one for the sake of consistency.

Do you put sugar in your rubs? I usually do for pork, but not for brisket.

Saccopoo
05-26-2009, 10:16 AM
If you like it that is what BBQ is all about. Different tastes. I'm from KC, but I like a vinegar sauce on pulled pork. Those flavors just go together. Does anyone here like mustard based sauces? I don't, and I like mustard. Once while in Denver I had a "White BBQ Sauce". It was used on chicken and turkey, and I was told it was a regional thing. I think it was a waste of smoked meat. Has anyone else had this, and what are you thoughts?

I really like the South Carolina mustard based BBQ sauces. Sadly though, you don't see them around much anymore, even down there. Fantastic on chicken and fish and the like. I even use it as an adjunct in burgers sometimes. I usually pick up several varieties when I am down there. Last stuff I had was the Sticky Fingers "Carolina Classic" and I thought it was pretty decent.

http://www.StickyFingers.com

HemiEd
05-26-2009, 10:30 AM
Buy them whole, get a sharp knife and cut it off yourself. Here's a good how-to: http://www.bbq-book.com/news2006/html/october_2006.html




And if you prefer a Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ

Thanks guys!

Stewie
05-26-2009, 10:31 AM
One thing I actually LIKE about the SC BBQ Association: They just don't care about the greenery. They specifically say leave the garnish off. We're not judging parsley and lettuce, we're judging barbecue. Give us the barbecue. They also say don't give us sauce on the side - give it to us how you want us to judge it. Sauce can make a huge difference in flavor, and you want all judges judging the same product.

Greenery is a big issue. The trend a couple of years ago was NO greenery. Now it's reverted back as far as I can tell. Appearance is part of the judging, and you "eat with your eyes" first. I personally hate trying to make things pretty because it's tough if you don't have an eye for it. Subsequently we never get high scores for appearance.

It would be tough to get a high score turning in meat in a styrofoam box alone, so I think most teams gave up on that idea. If the rule was NO GREENERY, then everyone would be on a level playing field, BUT the appearance category would be, in my mind, "Yep, it's meat in a styrofoam box."

Fire Me Boy!
05-26-2009, 12:30 PM
Greenery is a big issue. The trend a couple of years ago was NO greenery. Now it's reverted back as far as I can tell. Appearance is part of the judging, and you "eat with your eyes" first. I personally hate trying to make things pretty because it's tough if you don't have an eye for it. Subsequently we never get high scores for appearance.

It would be tough to get a high score turning in meat in a styrofoam box alone, so I think most teams gave up on that idea. If the rule was NO GREENERY, then everyone would be on a level playing field, BUT the appearance category would be, in my mind, "Yep, it's meat in a styrofoam box."

Judging down here where greenery will get you DQ'd, it makes the focus on appearance the meat alone. And you'd be surprised how some meat will look good to eat and others don't.