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58-4ever
06-10-2009, 07:36 PM
So the wifey and I are traveling to the Big Apple for our first anniversary. I've been there once and traveled the city by myself for about 6 days. I have many ideas on what to do and places to see. I was interested in hearing the Planet's take on your experiences there, places to eat, and things to see.

Current plans:

Yankees vs. Tigers on July 17th.
An afternoon in Central Park
A broadway show (open to suggestions)
A night in Times Square

Any and all other suggestions would be helpful!

redsurfer11
06-10-2009, 08:03 PM
Metropolitan Museum (Art) and the Museum of Natural History(Ben Stiller fame). Both are near Central Park.

SBK
06-10-2009, 08:08 PM
Lombardi's pizza. It's over 100 years old, still uses old charcoal ovens that wouldn't be allowed today.

For a good steak I've heard Peter Lugers is good, very expensive though.

T-post Tom
06-10-2009, 08:14 PM
There's a club on 38th called "Big Daddy's". Everything is for sale.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:18 PM
There's a club on 38th called "Big Daddy's". Everything is for sale.

Good info... More info please if you've been there. Is it a shady part of Manhattan?

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:19 PM
Lombardi's pizza. It's over 100 years old, still uses old charcoal ovens that wouldn't be allowed today.

For a good steak I've heard Peter Lugers is good, very expensive though.

Good pizza is certainly on the agenda. I'll look into Lombardi's. Thanks! :thumb:

Halfcan
06-10-2009, 08:20 PM
Lombardi's pizza. It's over 100 years old, still uses old charcoal ovens that wouldn't be allowed today.

For a good steak I've heard Peter Lugers is good, very expensive though.

LMAO Peter Luger

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:29 PM
If your wife is into the sushi, there's a place that we ate last visit there, which some have proclaimed to be the best sushi outside of Japan, called Sushi Yasuda.

Incredibly authentic-- not strange, out of place lounge music and snotty waiters.. it's all wood (meaning, every single part of it is made of one type of wood, up to the ceilings), the five sushi chefs help you and prepare for you right in front of you, and they lay out the cuts of fish you can choose from before hand preparing each one with day-fresh rice. Took the lady out, got stuffed on sushi and had some sake and beer, for a tab of $95. Very cheap for a high-quality meal in NYC. I recommend the Sea Urchin Roe... holy cow!

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:30 PM
Alright! This was my home this past spring. I love New York.

Lombardi's, like SBK mentioned, is great. On your way there or afterwards, it's also right next to Chinatown, so take some time to walk through that area, see the fresh seafood markets (where the seafood is still moving!) and the little shops (don't forget to haggle over your golden Buddha statue).

Don't spend a day in Central Park. Basically, it's a park. That's important for New Yorkers, who basically don't have much open space, but it's not important for people from the midwest, where open space is plentiful. Here's what you can do though: the first poster mentioned the Met and the Natural History museum -- great ideas. And they are both right next to Central Park on opposite sides of the park. So basically start at one, go through, and walk across the Park to the other. That way you see the park and you go to the Museums.

If you want to go to Broadway, and don't have any real preferences, well, Billy Eliot just won all those Tony's. So maybe you want to see that. It's expensive. Probably $150 for both of you. Make sure to book early as possible online as well. If that's too much, there are off-broadway plays and even off-off broadway plays that are great to see and a lot cheaper. And you still get to walk around Times Square as well (that's where all the theaters are, pretty much).

Walk across Brooklyn Bridge in the evening. It's great to do. You get the best views, you get into Brooklyn, and it's just perfect for a couple to do. If you like seafood, on the Manhattan side of the Bridge is a great resturant that is the oldest continously-run private business in New York (since the late 1700s). It's called the Bridge Cafe. Also, you can stroll around South Street and the Seaport and Pier 17 afterwards.

Ellis Island is great. If you have time, do it!!

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:32 PM
Good info... More info please if you've been there. Is it a shady part of Manhattan?

38th street is basically Times Square or East Side. There is no place in Manhattan that is shady. It's very safe.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:36 PM
Oh yeah, go to Serendipity3 and share the Frroooozzzenn Hot Chocolate. :drool:

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:37 PM
38th street is basically Times Square or East Side. There is no place in Manhattan that is shady. It's very safe.

So, have you heard of "Big Daddy's"? Did you go there?

SBK
06-10-2009, 08:39 PM
LMAO Peter Luger

No good?

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:39 PM
Alright! This was my home this past spring. I love New York.

Lombardi's, like SBK mentioned, is great. On your way there or afterwards, it's also right next to Chinatown, so take some time to walk through that area, see the fresh seafood markets (where the seafood is still moving!) and the little shops (don't forget to haggle over your golden Buddha statue).

Don't spend a day in Central Park. Basically, it's a park. That's important for New Yorkers, who basically don't have much open space, but it's not important for people from the midwest, where open space is plentiful. Here's what you can do though: the first poster mentioned the Met and the Natural History museum -- great ideas. And they are both right next to Central Park on opposite sides of the park. So basically start at one, go through, and walk across the Park to the other. That way you see the park and you go to the Museums.

If you want to go to Broadway, and don't have any real preferences, well, Billy Eliot just won all those Tony's. So maybe you want to see that. It's expensive. Probably $150 for both of you. Make sure to book early as possible online as well. If that's too much, there are off-broadway plays and even off-off broadway plays that are great to see and a lot cheaper. And you still get to walk around Times Square as well (that's where all the theaters are, pretty much).

Walk across Brooklyn Bridge in the evening. It's great to do. You get the best views, you get into Brooklyn, and it's just perfect for a couple to do. If you like seafood, on the Manhattan side of the Bridge is a great resturant that is the oldest continously-run private business in New York (since the late 1700s). It's called the Bridge Cafe. Also, you can stroll around South Street and the Seaport and Pier 17 afterwards.

Ellis Island is great. If you have time, do it!!

Very good suggestions. This is exactly what I was looking for. How is school going? It seems like you've been in forever. Political Science like myself right??

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 08:39 PM
Lombardi's pizza. It's over 100 years old, still uses old charcoal ovens that wouldn't be allowed today.

For a good steak I've heard Peter Lugers is good, very expensive though.

Peter Luger's is across the bridge and last time I was there, it was cash only.

If you want a good steak, go to Del Frisco's at the corner of 48th & 6th.

If you want really good Mexican (real Mexican, not Tex-Mex), go to Rosa Mexicano at 62nd & Columbus.

The Blue Fin (the restaurant in the W Hotel on 47th & Broadway) has very good food and many nights of the week, an excellent jazz trio.

There are a million bars. It's difficult to not walk into a cool bar in Mid-Town. I'd suggest PMing D2112 for more details.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:40 PM
Just don't go to one of those trendy "speakeasy" bars.. it's all the rage (as of a year ago) in NYC-- really, you pay twice the standard New York drink prices, all to drink in a bar that's in a basement. None of them I've been to have any more "character" than any other place in town...

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:42 PM
So, have you heard of "Big Daddy's"? Did you go there?

Never heard of it.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:43 PM
Another gimmicky place we went was called Tailor's, who make solid cocktails. If you can stand gelatinous cosmos, marshmallow white russians, and so forth, you might enjoy it, provided you can also afford the $13/cocktail bill with it.

We stayed at the SoHo Grand, and the bar was "oh so chic"... stopped in for a drink after a show, and ended up paying $26 for two drinks. Jeesus. But boy were the women good looking... holy sh**

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:43 PM
Just don't go to one of those trendy "speakeasy" bars.. it's all the rage (as of a year ago) in NYC-- really, you pay twice the standard New York drink prices, all to drink in a bar that's in a basement. None of them I've been to have any more "character" than any other place in town...

I agree. Last time I was there I went to one of those trendy basement bars. I wasn't too impressed.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:44 PM
Very good suggestions. This is exactly what I was looking for. How is school going? It seems like you've been in forever. Political Science like myself right??

Very good. I am coming up on my senior year. Yep, still in Political Science and History. Still not sure what I'll do afterwards. :shrug:

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 08:45 PM
We stayed at the SoHo Grand, and the bar was "oh so chic"... stopped in for a drink after a show, and ended up paying $26 for two drinks. Jeesus. But boy were the women good looking... holy sh**

Unfortunately, that's a bargain compared to Los Angeles.

Three weeks ago, I paid $42 dollars, before tip, for two drinks.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:45 PM
Unfortunately, that's a bargain compared to Los Angeles.

Three weeks ago, I paid $42 dollars, before tip, for two drinks.

Yeah, but you drink solid gold cosmos, right?
:p

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:46 PM
Peter Luger's is across the bridge and last time I was there, it was cash only.

Oh yeah, that reminds me -- Lombardi's is cash only. There are a lot of places cash only in NYC. Or else credit card. But there are a lot of banks and stores with ATM machines around.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 08:46 PM
Yeah, but you drink solid gold cosmos, right?
:p

My wife had a Ketel One dirty Martini and I had a Ketel One Soda.

$42 dollars please!

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 08:48 PM
There's a totally cool bar in Grand Central Station - I can't remember the name right now but all they play is Frank, Dean & Sammy. GREAT music, great vibe.

The bar overlooks the waiting area. It's a very cool place to hang.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:50 PM
There's a totally cool bar in Grand Central Station - I can't remember the name right now but all they play is Frank, Dean & Sammy. GREAT music, great vibe.

The bar overlooks the waiting area. It's a very cool place to hang.

That sounds very cool. I'm going to look that up right now.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:51 PM
There's a totally cool bar in Grand Central Station - I can't remember the name right now but all they play is Frank, Dean & Sammy. GREAT music, great vibe.

The bar overlooks the waiting area. It's a very cool place to hang.

Is it an oyster bar?

T-post Tom
06-10-2009, 08:52 PM
Good info... More info please if you've been there. Is it a shady part of Manhattan?

Sorry brother, I was just messin' around. "Big Daddy's" is a no-holds-barred sex club. Not a place for most anniversary trips. My bad, sorry.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:54 PM
Sorry brother, I was just messin' around. "Big Daddy's" is a no-holds-barred sex club. Not a place for most anniversary trips. My bad, sorry.

That's ok. Maybe the wife will have an open mind? :rolleyes:

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:55 PM
The Oyster Bar in Grand Central is pretty nice and reasonably priced. I had the Manhattan Clam Chowder. Mmmhh mmmh

There is also the Campbell Apartment. This might be what Dane is talking about. It's a bar/lounge that is very crowded. Also, you have to wear nice clothes and dress shoes. I was not allowed in.

If you do decide to do this, you might as well get your shoes shined too outside for a trip to the olden days.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 08:57 PM
Very good. I am coming up on my senior year. Yep, still in Political Science and History. Still not sure what I'll do afterwards. :shrug:

Are you thinking of Law School. I got in and didn't go. I decided that I wanted to make 100K instead of spending 100K.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 08:58 PM
Are you thinking of Law School. I got in and didn't go. I decided that I wanted to make 100K instead of spending 100K.

It's an option. I'll probably take the LSAT in September/October and go if I get a good offer from either Iowa or Drake.

What'd you do instead?

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 09:04 PM
It's an option. I'll probably take the LSAT in September/October and go if I get a good offer from either Iowa or Drake.

What'd you do instead?

I took a position with a Fortune 500 company. It's a solid company that is pretty stable in a challenging economic environment. :)

Cannibal
06-10-2009, 09:08 PM
Dude, the City is dominated by liberal elites. I would suggest you vacation elsewhere, like Birmingham, AL.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 09:09 PM
Is it an oyster bar?

No, it was just a regular bar.

If I can't think of the name tonight, I'll call the girl (wife's good friend) who took us there tomorrow.

Mojo Jojo
06-10-2009, 09:11 PM
Take the Staten Island Ferry over and back. Cool view of the city.

Just because of history...Ground Zero.

Take a train to anywhere out of Penn Station.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 09:11 PM
The Oyster Bar in Grand Central is pretty nice and reasonably priced. I had the Manhattan Clam Chowder. Mmmhh mmmh

There is also the Campbell Apartment. This might be what Dane is talking about. It's a bar/lounge that is very crowded. Also, you have to wear nice clothes and dress shoes. I was not allowed in.

If you do decide to do this, you might as well get your shoes shined too outside for a trip to the olden days.

That's it: Campbell Apartment.

I didn't have a clothes issue, though: Nice jeans, shoes and a long-sleeved, buttoned down shirt (untucked).

gblowfish
06-10-2009, 09:14 PM
It's been awhile since I was in NYC, but here's what my wifey and I did:

1) David Letterman: Go to Letterman ticket exchange on his website, you might get lucky and get in to see a show. Check out Rupert G's Hello Deli around the corner.

2) Art: MOMA, Met, Guggenheim (designed by FL Wright), Whitney.

3) Wall St. & Twin Towers Ground Zero

4) Ellis Island / Statue of Liberty at Battery Park (tip of Manahttan)

5) Yankee Stadium is a ROUGH neighborhood, don't wander around there at night. Either take the train straight there and straight back, or take a cab. Train is cheaper. Stay the hell out of Harlem at night.

6) Try pizza by the slice at a couple different places. Ask the hotel for restaurant tips. You can find just about anything except good BBQ. Have italian. I ate at Sinatra's favorite restaurant, can't remember the name now.

7) Carnegie Deli.

8) Radio City Music Hall and NBC. Check out the Today Show.

9) St. Patrick's Cathedral. Go to a service on Sunday AM.

10) Tickets for Broadway shows in Times Square. You'll just have to get whatever is available. We saw Les Miserables when I was there. My wife loved it. Me...meh...

Be prepared to spend and spend and spend. Tip: You can get a limo from your hotel to La Guardia for about the same money as a cab ride. The doormen at the hotel are your friends. Tip them good, they'll take good care of you.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 09:18 PM
We always take Tel Aviv car service (Lincoln Town Car) and it's $50 each way from JFK.

You can pre-pay as well.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 09:21 PM
Sinatra's favorite pizza was Grimaldi's. This is a place that is basically right under the Brooklyn Bridge on the Brooklyn side. The wait is usually very long on a weekend night.

Also, it's very hard to do both Ellis Island and Statue of Liberty in the same day. You have to be the first in line in the morning basically. You will have to choose if you want to do one of them. I'd choose Ellis, because you get to see the Statue up close anyway. But either are good. Make sure if you go to the island, you go into the statue if that's what you want (you need a separate ticket for that.)

St. Patrick's Cathedral is right next to Rockefeller, and they are both pretty close to Times Square -- just a short walk away. It'd be worth going to see both. Also, they are both on 5th Avenue. So go to Tiffany's and buy her a ring ;)

Do cabs for things that are just out of walking distance, but I would never go up and down Manhattan in one or from Manhattan to another borough. The trains are just so easy and cheap. Plus, that's all part of the experience, right? Give me a $2.50 train ride over a $50 cab anyday. But that all depends on personal finances and stuff.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 09:28 PM
Walking is definitely part of the "experience" as well. Definitely walk to Central Park and spend a few hours checking it out. I'd walk as much as possible, unless you're heading to Brooklyn, Ellis Island or NJ.

I walked from the W at 47th and Broadway to the Museum of Natural History on 79th. I spent the whole day walking around the museum and walked back when they closed. I've walked to Soho from Mid-Town as well. If the weather's nice, I'd rather do that than cab or subway.

There's just way to much to see.

DaKCMan AP
06-10-2009, 09:30 PM
A must anytime in NY.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 09:32 PM
Walking is definitely part of the "experience" as well. Definitely walk to Central Park and spend a few hours checking it out. I'd walk as much as possible, unless you're heading to Brooklyn, Ellis Island or NJ.

I walked from the W at 47th and Broadway to the Museum of Natural History on 79th. I spent the whole day walking around the museum and walked back when they closed. I've walked to Soho from Mid-Town as well. If the weather's nice, I'd rather do that than cab or subway.

There's just way to much to see.

Yeah, definitely. And the streets go by quickly, though 32 blocks might sound like a lot it's not bad.

gblowfish
06-10-2009, 09:32 PM
Ah...Patsy's on 54th St. That was the italian restuarant I went to. It was very tasty, reminded me a lot of the old Italian Gardens in downtown KC.

http://www.patsys.com/

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 09:35 PM
I went to Carnegie Deli too. It's pretty good. I had what DaKCman had. You need the mustard on it though. That really completes it.

Carnegie is just a really quick walk north of Times Square on 55th and 7th Avenue (I think 7th). Pretty crowded. You might have to right next to strangers so hopefully that's okay. In chinatown, you sit at the same booths with strangers if they need space. It's pretty cool.

DaKCMan AP
06-10-2009, 09:38 PM
I went to Carnegie Deli too. It's pretty good. I had what DaKCman had. You need the mustard on it though. That really completes it.

Carnegie is just a really quick walk north of Times Square on 55th and 7th Avenue (I think 7th). Pretty crowded. You might have to right next to strangers so hopefully that's okay. In chinatown, you sit at the same booths with strangers if they need space. It's pretty cool.

Of course mustard was put on it!! Just snapped the picture prior to altering, and then devouring, the masterpiece.

gblowfish
06-10-2009, 09:38 PM
NYC will challenge your personal space in many ways. The subway, especially. I had to ride a train packed with Yankee fans from Times Square all the way up to the Bronx. I had my Royals cap on. Royals got pasted 13-0. Then I had to ride all the way back again. Brutal. Brutal. People literally in your grill for 45 minutes.

gblowfish
06-10-2009, 09:40 PM
You can go by the Dakota and see where John Lennon got shot. Strawberry Fields is not far away in Central Park from there. Also, go into the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and just have a drink. Very elegant hotel. Greenwich Village and Soho are ok, but not as high on the list as the other things previously mentioned. If you like history, you can go down on Wall St. and see where George Washington took the oath of office to become the first president. It's right down by ground zero, and Battery Park for the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island ferry is right there too.

58-4ever
06-10-2009, 09:40 PM
NYC will challenge your personal space in many ways. The subway, especially. I had to ride a train packed with Yankee fans from Times Square all the way up to the Bronx. I had my Royals cap on. Royals got pasted 13-0. Then I had to ride all the way back again. Brutal. Brutal. People literally in your grill for 45 minutes.

Luckily I won't have a large rooting interest in the games. I hate the Tigers AND the Yankees. Although I really hate the Yankees.

DaneMcCloud
06-10-2009, 09:43 PM
NYC will challenge your personal space in many ways. The subway, especially. I had to ride a train packed with Yankee fans from Times Square all the way up to the Bronx. I had my Royals cap on. Royals got pasted 13-0. Then I had to ride all the way back again. Brutal. Brutal. People literally in your grill for 45 minutes.

That's the biggest difference between LA and NY.

In L.A., everyone's got a car. We don't all live side-by-side in giant apartments or condos or lofts. The city streets are wide and the LA Basin is huge and spread out.

In NYC, it's the opposite. Nearly everyone takes city transportation or cabs. It seems like there are 100 people waiting at each and every stop light to cross the street. It's crowded everywhere. In the summer, the city smells from the subway vents.

That being said, I LOVE visiting Manhattan. The best restaurants in the world, great sites, great history, great people.

I just couldn't live there.

gblowfish
06-10-2009, 09:43 PM
Root for injuries.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 09:46 PM
You can go by the Dakota and see where John Lennon got shot. Strawberry Fields is not far away in Central Park from there. Also, go into the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and just have a drink. Very elegant hotel. Greenwich Village and Soho are ok, but not as high on the list as the other things previously mentioned. If you like history, you can go down on Wall St. and see where George Washington took the oath of office to become the first president. It's right down by ground zero, and Battery Park for the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island ferry is right there too.

Also down there is Fraunces Tavern. Pretty nice place if you have a few hours and like Revolutionary War era history. It's where Washington gave his Farewell speech to his Revolutionary generals before retiring to Mount Vernon, several years before un-retiring and becoming our first president.

Also in the Federal Hall building (the steps of which Washington took the oath), I think a Lincoln exhibit is still going on. I didn't get to see it, but anything with Lincoln is a win.