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Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 07:54 PM
So, after a few months of experiencing the whole home-buying process, I have finally closed on my first house!!

It was incredibly stressful at times, and fun at others. The mortgage industry, ESPECIALLY mortgage insurance companies, have become incredibly tight after the recent meltdown. And while I really appreciate that they've become so anal about accounting for every penny in the home-buying process, it sucks when it's happening to you!! I felt like the whole experience, especially towards the end, was like having a second full-time job.. I knew it would be a lot of work, but I had no idea what I was getting myself into.

So, on to a request for help from the Planeteers..
I have a separate account I created recently, with right around 3% of the value of the house being saved for renovations or required maintenance. I will use a little of that to get some tools. The problem is, I grew up with two parents who relocated to Kansas City from the East Coast. Both grew up and lived in apartments until they moved here, and know nothing about house maintenance. Thus, I was raised the same way: I can sit with you and talk about literature and electronics for hours on end, but I can't begin to put a list together for home maintenance.

SO, can the Planeteers suggest a list of required tools that every young homeowner should own? I have about $300 that I'd be able to spend, and would like simply the necessities. I realize I'll acquire a number of products through the years as projects dictate, but what do I start out with? I figure a good set of wrenches and screwdrivers, and maybe an electric drill, but after that I'm lost. Your help is appreciated, and maybe a little rep could come your way too!!

KCChiefsMan
06-10-2009, 07:58 PM
congrats dude!

DaFace
06-10-2009, 07:59 PM
Well, a hammer is typically pretty important. Assuming you've got a yard, you'll probably want a shovel, rake, and that type of thing. Depending on whether or not you're including the big purchases in that $300, you're gonna need a lawn mower and weed eater, but those could eat up your $300 pretty quick.

Congrats on the house!

Cannibal
06-10-2009, 08:02 PM
You'll need a cordless drill. It will most likely be your most used tool (other than lawn equipment).

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:02 PM
Of course I don't have a good pic-- had to take a screen shot of Google Street View because I'm not on my usual pic. The house is a very strong dark green...

Cannibal
06-10-2009, 08:09 PM
Yeah, get a socket set as well.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:11 PM
Thanks for the advice guys-- rep to you.

It's funny- I got done signing my life away (closing) this morning, and I thought I'd feel this gigantic weight lift off my shoulders. And I did, for a second. But almost instantaneously, it was replaced with the weight of having the responsibility of house upkeep ominously looming over me. I'm sure I'll be fine in the long run, but I might have to be that dorky guy that prints off home-maintenance instructions off the Internet. And no, I'm not too proud to do it!!

If I were to get drill bits, how many would I need? Would I want one of those extensive ones that stretch a 12" case, or would one of the tiny hand-held cases with only a few bits do the trick?

MIAdragon
06-10-2009, 08:13 PM
every male past the age of 18 should have a tool box with basic tools. Go to sears and pick up a small kit you don't need anything fancy a hammer a few screw drivers an adjustable wrench and a pair of vice grips

milkman
06-10-2009, 08:15 PM
Phonebook.

milkman
06-10-2009, 08:16 PM
every male past the age of 18 should have a tool box with basic tools. Go to sears and pick up a small kit you don't need anything fancy a hammer a few screw drivers an adjustable wrench and a pair of vice grips

I am as far from handy as any man can be, and even I own a an extensive set of tools.

rockymtnchief
06-10-2009, 08:17 PM
Get the basics, but don't forget a level. You don't want your projects leaning or being cock-eyed. A basic level is inexpensive. A laser level is even better.

milkman
06-10-2009, 08:26 PM
BTW, Satnley, congrats on the new home.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:30 PM
Thanks, guys, great suggestions.
Looks like I'll be purchasing:
-A Hammer
-Shovel
-Rake
-Cordless drill
-Socket set
-Vice grips
-Level
-Adjustable wrench
I have a screwdriver set from working on computers (*pushes up nerd glasses*)

Rep to one and to all.

Bugeater
06-10-2009, 08:32 PM
There isn't anything you can't fix with a sawzall and a sledgehammer.

DaFace
06-10-2009, 08:36 PM
By the way, if you're looking for some basic guidance on how to take care of a lot of the around-the-house maintenance, this book's a decent primer. Nothing's like experience, but this will at least point you in the right direction for a lot of the everyday stuff.

http://www.amazon.com/Better-Homes-Gardens-Book-Yourself/dp/0696221802

MIAdragon
06-10-2009, 08:39 PM
Another tip what ever tool you buy DO NOT buy an off brand pick up quality stuff the first time and never look back.

Check these.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00934202000P?vName=Tools&cName=Tool+Sets&sName=Home+Owner+Tool+Sets

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00950083000P?vName=Tools&cName=Tool+Sets&sName=Home+Owner+Tool+Sets

aturnis
06-10-2009, 08:41 PM
This (http://www.cpoprotools.com/products/zrr9223.html?ref=frooglezrr9223)

Reconditioned 5 pc. 18v cordless tool set
http://www.cpoprotools.com/images/product/ridgid/medium/zrr9223.jpg
$299.99

Not much you can't do with these, plus an impact driver is the best, most useful/helpful tool you could ever buy. I got mine, no problems at all, plus you get a 1yr. warranty.

Also, I checked into it, if someone buys a 5pc combo kit, and ONE thing goes bad, they have to send in the WHOLE kit. So, chances are, you get four used tools, and one reconditioned one. Only difference is that these are stamped with the word "recon". Best tool investment I ever made.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:44 PM
I've been living with my long-term girlfriend for a couple years now, in different (one-bedroom) apartments around town. We'll have a basement, but it's unfinished so I guess it'll be the garage. I think I've needed a mancave for years!! I can totally see the necessity. Maybe it'll be nice to find a hobby and have "quiet" time!

Oh, and I played it smart, being the only name on the lease in case things go south.

FAX
06-10-2009, 08:46 PM
Congratulations, Mr. Stanley Nickels. May your new home be filled with love and peace and many happy memories.

FAX

Buzzsaw
06-10-2009, 08:48 PM
Most everything can be fixed w/ some duct tape and/or WD-40

Chazno
06-10-2009, 08:50 PM
Not exactly tools, but you might into some painting supplies.

RJ
06-10-2009, 08:50 PM
Thanks, guys, great suggestions.
Looks like I'll be purchasing:
-A Hammer
-Shovel
-Rake
-Cordless drill
-Socket set
-Vice grips
-Level
-Adjustable wrench
I have a screwdriver set from working on computers (*pushes up nerd glasses*)

Rep to one and to all.


Good start. Add:

big-assed roll of duct (duck) tape
utilty blade
rubber mallet
hole punch
picture hanging stuff......look for a box with various items
don't forget that level

RJ
06-10-2009, 08:51 PM
Most everything can be fixed w/ some duct tape and/or WD-40


Do not forget the WD-40.

RJ
06-10-2009, 08:52 PM
Congratulations, Mr. Stanley Nickels. May your new home be filled with love and peace and many happy memories.

FAX


Do not forget the love and happy memories.

Phobia
06-10-2009, 08:55 PM
Here's something I wrote at Christmas - it still works.

http://greensummitdispatch.com/articles/Santa_Kloster___s_top_10_tools_this_season_01,5,09

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 08:57 PM
Do not forget the WD-40.

I got to the new place about half an hour earlier than the seller was going to be there, so I went to Wal Mart right down the street, and bought my first purchase for the new house:

A huge-ass can of WD-40.

Phobia
06-10-2009, 08:57 PM
The saws are crap! Buy the 18 volt drill and that's it.

Truth. I don't hate a cordless sawsall but I don't have much patience for a cordless circular saw.

ChiefsLV
06-10-2009, 09:07 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned channel locks. I used that tool more than any other when I owned a house. Sometimes I even needed two pair.

http://www.howsed.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/channellocks.jpg

aturnis
06-10-2009, 09:19 PM
I'm going to go ahead and refer you to my above post. If you ever plan on taking on any major project. You will need any and all of the above.

The set includes:

Sawzall - Cut wood, metal, anything. If it's in your way, it's gone.

Circular saw - Until you have the space and need for a table saw, it'll cut it.

Flashlight - Bigger and better than the everyday flashlight. Plus, if you need it, and find it with dead batteries, just grab the spare, or recharge it.

Impact driver - Incredible. SO glad to have one.

Hammer Drill/Driver - It's a regular drill, and when you need to, you can switch it to "hammering" if you need to drill into concrete or any mason block.

Outside of this, the basics the other guys mentioned are essential.

A good torpedo level(9 inch) preferably w/ rare earth magnets, it won't fall off of a metal surface like one w/ the refrigerator magnet will.

A 4ft. level. For bigger leveling projects, a 9 incher just won't do.

Hammer - cheap. Generally a hammer is a hammer unless you swing one for a living.

10-in-1 screwdriver - Takes care of quite a few tasks.

Allen's wrench set - You will buy something that will need assembled or reassembled, and you will need these eventually.

Socket set - Car/home whatever.

wrenches

vise grips

pliers

slip-joint pliers

As far as hand tools go...go to harbour freight. Cheap as shit, and like I said, a hammer is a hammer, a wrench is a wrench. Unless you are a self-respecting tradesman, noone's going to see you use it and there's no need to buy the more expensive shit until you can afford it.

As for power tools, do your research before you buy. Most will be comparable, but take in to account what's is important to you. Quality, where it is made, brand name, price, warranty, whatever. Remember, everything you knew about brands like Craftsman and DeWalt has changed. Craftsman tools I believe are now made by Ryobi, and no longer carry a lifetime warranty, on anything. While Dewalt makes most of it's tools in Mexico and China. Buyer beware.

stlchiefs
06-10-2009, 09:22 PM
Thanks for rubbing it in. :cuss: We lost out on a house today in a bidding war. Who would have thought in this market there would be multiple offers on the same house on the same day. This was our 2nd go around in 3 weeks as we canceled a contract 2 weeks into it after we couldn't come to terms post inspection and now this today. This sucks :harumph:

Congrats to you though.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 09:26 PM
I'm going to go ahead and refer you to my above post. If you ever plan on taking on any major project. You will need any and all of the above.

The set includes:

Sawzall - Cut wood, metal, anything. If it's in your way, it's gone.

Circular saw - Until you have the space and need for a table saw, it'll cut it.

Flashlight - Bigger and better than the everyday flashlight. Plus, if you need it, and find it with dead batteries, just grab the spare, or recharge it.

Impact driver - Incredible. SO glad to have one.

Hammer Drill/Driver - It's a regular drill, and when you need to, you can switch it to "hammering" if you need to drill into concrete or any mason block.

Outside of this, the basics the other guys mentioned are essential.

A good torpedo level(9 inch) preferably w/ rare earth magnets, it won't fall off of a metal surface like one w/ the refrigerator magnet will.

A 4ft. level. For bigger leveling projects, a 9 incher just won't do.

Hammer - cheap. Generally a hammer is a hammer unless you swing one for a living.

10-in-1 screwdriver - Takes care of quite a few tasks.

Allen's wrench set - You will buy something that will need assembled or reassembled, and you will need these eventually.

Socket set - Car/home whatever.

wrenches

vise grips

pliers

slip-joint pliers

As far as hand tools go...go to harbour freight. Cheap as shit, and like I said, a hammer is a hammer, a wrench is a wrench. Unless you are a self-respecting tradesman, noone's going to see you use it and there's no need to buy the more expensive shit until you can afford it.

As for power tools, do your research before you buy. Most will be comparable, but take in to account what's is important to you. Quality, where it is made, brand name, price, warranty, whatever. Remember, everything you knew about brands like Craftsman and DeWalt has changed. Craftsman tools I believe are now made by Ryobi, and no longer carry a lifetime warranty, on anything. While Dewalt makes most of it's tools in Mexico and China. Buyer beware.

Excellent advice! Rep

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 09:27 PM
Thanks for rubbing it in. :cuss: We lost out on a house today in a bidding war. Who would have thought in this market there would be multiple offers on the same house on the same day. This was our 2nd go around in 3 weeks as we canceled a contract 2 weeks into it after we couldn't come to terms post inspection and now this today. This sucks :harumph:

Congrats to you though.

Rep for good luck!

aturnis
06-10-2009, 09:27 PM
The saws are crap! Buy the 18 volt drill and that's it. Ryobie works fine for me. For the saws buy electric and run the extension cord.

All cordless circular saws are junk if you know what a corded one can do, but that's the trade off for convenience. Mine though, has recently cut through 15 2x12's on what was left of a battery charge. Actually, I use mine more than the average person, and none of it have failed to deliver.

I'm a tradesman, and I put other peoples industrial grade tools to THE test ALL day. Doesn't matter when they're not mine right? Work HAS to get done. I'd put my personal Ridgid set right at the top as far as quality goes for your average home owner. Plus, the consumer reports were glowing compared to say DeWalt's.

Jenson71
06-10-2009, 09:32 PM
It is important to get your home blessed by a priest and name every room after a Saint, preferably one of the Church Fathers. Even better is if you can get an 8'10" photo of each Saint in the room. Somewhere in the front yard, probably on your door's right (left as you look at it) should be a statue of either Mary or Saint Francis. Finally, the first thing one should see when entering the home is a painting of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and an 8'10" photo of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI.

And then you should be good to go.

:D

Congrats on the house. It looks very nice.

Stanley Nickels
06-10-2009, 09:35 PM
It is important to get your home blessed by a priest and name every room after a Saint, preferably one of the Church Fathers. Even better is if you can get an 8'10" photo of each Saint in the room. Somewhere in the front yard, probably on your door's right (left as you look at it) should be a statue of either Mary or Saint Francis. Finally, the first thing one should see when entering the home is a painting of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and an 8'10" photo of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI.

And then you should be good to go.

:D

Congrats on the house. It looks very nice.

My girlfriend wants to "bless" the house, I shit you not, by burning White Sage. It's one of the things that comes with the territory when you date a woman who wants to consider herself "artsy". I basically adopted a "choose your battles" approach and said sure, whatever. But I'm making her burn it outside, that's for GD sure.

Mr. Krab
06-10-2009, 09:36 PM
:clap:

Bugeater
06-10-2009, 09:39 PM
The saws are crap! Buy the 18 volt drill and that's it. Ryobie works fine for me. For the saws buy electric and run the extension cord.
This. Unless you buy high end cordless tools and you use them on a daily basis, they are a waste of money.

aturnis
06-10-2009, 09:42 PM
Oh, and don't forget a good square. Essential when building anything from wood, even a workbench.
http://www.empirelevel.com/images/products/Squares/rafter_squares/396.jpg

Also, the rake and shovel cost $10 a piece at Menards/Lowes/Home Depot. Buy them as you need them, or one piece of the basic lawnscaping toolset per visit to the store.

Which brings me to another point, decide which of those three places you like the best. The man in me says Menards, but I can't get over the fact that every time I need help finding something, none of their employees even know what it is. That's is b/c most of their workforce is high school kids. The only thing it's good for is a good deal. Go buy trim, if you get 200ft., tell them 100ft. when they ask. That 16yr. old girl will not know, nor does she care. I don't do this, but I've seen/known it to happen.

Home Depot is clean and employs mostly adults. I like that. What I don't like, is that their "project pro's" work only during the week. Newsflash, so do I. I do projects on the weekends.

As for Lowe's, I haven't really tried them. They seem alright, but I can't get over the idea that they may be tied to Wal-Mart.(I haven't checked to see if they are either) It's seems like every Lowe's I come across sits right next door to a Wal-Mart or Sams Club, and shares their colors. Oh well.

aturnis
06-10-2009, 10:10 PM
This. Unless you buy high end cordless tools and you use them on a daily basis, they are a waste of money.

I completely disagree. I'd think/assume this being his first house, it's not the Taj Mahal. If he plans on upping it's value, and comfort, he might do it himself.

If you build a deck/shed/garage whatever what have ya, you will appreciate every tool in that set, especially for the dirt cheap price. 18v is enough to do anything you will ever have to do. If you can't cut something with that sawzall, might as well call a pro.(I admit, if you're going to cut cast iron pipe, you might need two batteries, but you won't so forget it.)

I pride myself on being a weekend warrior and in the first 2 summers in my first house, have done new siding and windows. Refinished(drywall/trim/carpet/fixtures) a whole room which was wood paneling. Built a 12x16 shed/workshop. New trim throughout the entire house. A 12x18 deck 4ft off the ground. Removed a huge 2 trunk tree that hung over the house. Installed all new communications cabling(voice/data/video) through the whole house, couldn't stand to staple the shit all over my new siding. Installed all new appliances throughout the house.

Next on the list is privacy fence, I hate chain link. LOADS of landscaping/retaining walls and possibly sodding. New kitchen and "masterbedroom" flooring. Trying to find creative ways to maximize our storage in the shed.(We're already outgrowing the house.) The only thing I'm going to hire out is the installation of central air. I just don't want to **** with that.

You name it, I'm doing it. That's all just at my house, it doesn't even include all the help I've given my brother building his house. I spent a LOT more time on his that my own that's for sure.

Trust me, these tools will do ANYTHING you(a guy who admittedly doesn't own many tools) will want to do. The only one that even kind of "sucks" is the circular saw. If you don't like it, sell it for $50 on ebay and buy a good corded one brand new for $35. The convenience of not needing to drag/sort through or find/ untangle multiple drop cords in multiple different areas is worth it. You aren't a professional doing industrial grade work, you won't need industrial grade tools. Don't listen to some of these guys. If you even plan to build a deck, this tool kit is perfect. Just the deck has utilized every single tool in that kit. The only thing I haven't used while building it is the hammerdrill setting on the drill.

FAX
06-10-2009, 10:18 PM
My girlfriend wants to "bless" the house, I shit you not, by burning White Sage. It's one of the things that comes with the territory when you date a woman who wants to consider herself "artsy". I basically adopted a "choose your battles" approach and said sure, whatever. But I'm making her burn it outside, that's for GD sure.

This is a very good idea, Mr. Stanley Nickels. The burning of certain spices or incense can remove any unwanted spirits or ghosts from a dwelling. If it's not a new construction or if the structure has been built upon an ancient burial ground or cemetery, this can be extremely important. If, however, you have reason to be particularly concerned that the house may still retain a spirit or the life force of some orb-being or deceased person after the burning of incense, you will want to procure an adult, male, ring-tailed lemur and, by squeezing it's mid-section, force it to fart in each room while facing East. This is certain to run off any remaining potentially troublesome spirits, for sure.

FAX

Groves
06-10-2009, 10:19 PM
Buy a good ladder. You'll use it for a billion things, and you'll thank us both now and later.

Bugeater
06-10-2009, 10:20 PM
I completely disagree. I'd think/assume this being his first house, it's not the Taj Mahal. If he plans on upping it's value, and comfort, he might do it himself.

If you build a deck/shed/garage whatever what have ya, you will appreciate every tool in that set, especially for the dirt cheap price. 18v is enough to do anything you will ever have to do. If you can't cut something with that sawzall, might as well call a pro.(I admit, if you're going to cut cast iron pipe, you might need two batteries, but you won't so forget it.)

I pride myself on being a weekend warrior and in the first 2 summers in my first house, have done new siding and windows. Refinished(drywall/trim/carpet/fixtures) a whole room which was wood paneling. Built a 12x16 shed/workshop. New trim throughout the entire house. A 12x18 deck 4ft off the ground. Removed a huge 2 trunk tree that hung over the house. Installed all new communications cabling(voice/data/video) through the whole house, couldn't stand to staple the shit all over my new siding. Installed all new appliances throughout the house.

Next on the list is privacy fence, I hate chain link. LOADS of landscaping/retaining walls and possibly sodding. New kitchen and "masterbedroom" flooring. Trying to find creative ways to maximize our storage in the shed.(We're already outgrowing the house.) The only thing I'm going to hire out is the installation of central air. I just don't want to **** with that.

You name it, I'm doing it. That's all just at my house, it doesn't even include all the help I've given my brother building his house. I spent a LOT more time on his that my own that's for sure.

Trust me, these tools will do ANYTHING you(a guy who admittedly doesn't own many tools) will want to do. The only one that even kind of "sucks" is the circular saw. If you don't like it, sell it for $50 on ebay and buy a good corded one brand new for $35. The convenience of not needing to drag/sort through or find/ untangle multiple drop cords in multiple different areas is worth it. You aren't a professional doing industrial grade work, you won't need industrial grade tools. Don't listen to some of these guys. If you even plan to build a deck, this tool kit is perfect. Just the deck has utilized every single tool in that kit. The only thing I haven't used while building it is the hammerdrill setting on the drill.
The average homeowner isn't going to do that scale of projects. More than likely those tools will sit around unused for the majority of the time, and the batteries will go bad and then they will be useless because replacement batteries cost nearly as much as a new tool. A decent corded saw or drill that is only used occasionally will last virtually forever.

Phobia
06-10-2009, 10:41 PM
Yeah - I don't necessarily agree with Aturnis. He's a pretty hardcore DIYer. I think the advice you'll find in my column will be a little more in line with what you need.

Somebody mentioned Harbour Freight at one point. Here's the rule. Buy anything you want there as long as it does not plug into the wall.

aturnis
06-10-2009, 10:44 PM
The average homeowner isn't going to do that scale of projects. More than likely those tools will sit around unused for the majority of the time, and the batteries will go bad and then they will be useless because replacement batteries cost nearly as much as a new tool. A decent corded saw or drill that is only used occasionally will last virtually forever.

If Stanley only has $300 to spend on tools, then I'm guessing with the new home, his budget is going to be a bit tighter than he'd like. Now, if Stanley wants a deck, he might not be able to afford to have someone build him one. That should not deter him from getting his deck though should it?

His first home is a good opportunity to make money/learn/get new hobbies, and be productive. I'm just trying to encourage his handyman growth. We can't all be ballers, but that doesn't mean we can't live like ballers. As long as we know how to do for ourselves.

Phobia
06-10-2009, 10:46 PM
If he only has $300 to spend on tools then he has no business building a deck. A mower and weed whacker is gonna shoot his budget immediately.

Bugeater
06-10-2009, 10:55 PM
If Stanley only has $300 to spend on tools, then I'm guessing with the new home, his budget is going to be a bit tighter than he'd like. Now, if Stanley wants a deck, he might not be able to afford to have someone build him one. That should not deter him from getting his deck though should it?

His first home is a good opportunity to make money/learn/get new hobbies, and be productive. I'm just trying to encourage his handyman growth. We can't all be ballers, but that doesn't mean we can't live like ballers. As long as we know how to do for ourselves.
Again, it depends on the nature of the projects he intends to do. He used the word "maintenance" in the thread starter, so I'm assuming he means minor repairs and small projects. It's just been my experience that the batteries on cordless tools only last a couple years regardless of how often you use them, and if they're only getting used once every month or two, you don't get your money's worth out of them. Heck, I still have the same corded Skilsaw I bought ten years ago, and I've gone through 4-5 cordless drills in that time.

aturnis
06-10-2009, 11:02 PM
Somebody mentioned Harbour Freight at one point. Here's the rule. Buy anything you want there as long as it does not plug into the wall.

Agree with that 100%, same goes for pneumatic tools. I did though buy an angle grinder from them, b/c I'm pretty sure I'll only really ever need it once, and I needed it now. So...$35 later, progress is ready to be made.

I won't pretend to have all the know how and experience Phil has, I am a tradesman, but there's a difference between me and him. I do electrical work and do have to use ever major power tool under the sun from time to time. Whether it's a plasma cutter to cut rediculously large steele plating, or a big'o hammerdrill to drill a 4" hole through 2ft. of concrete, but it's not my stuff. Just my name on the work.

Phil does a wide variety of construction though and also owns his business I believe. Though his jobs would obviously be smaller scale, it just means he's moving on to the next one faster and learning from a whole new mess of problems often.

I'd honestly think the only thing you'd really have a problem with Phil, is the circular saw. Which is understandable. Or maybe the brand in general? I'm just saying, he's not drilling through 2ft. concrete, or cutting plate steel.

I may be biased though...on a large construction job, the only tools any trade typically uses that require a cord are the ones that do HEAVY works loads such as drilling/cutting through indestructibly designed mediums. Table and miter saws. Lights, vacuums, floor sander some angle grinders and mud mixers and of course batteries.

Look up at the biggest building in your city, and know that at least 80%(and I'd think that's generous) of the tool use it took to build that building was done with cordless tools.

aturnis
06-10-2009, 11:13 PM
Again, it depends on the nature of the projects he intends to do. He used the word "maintenance" in the thread starter, so I'm assuming he means minor repairs and small projects. It's just been my experience that the batteries on cordless tools only last a couple years regardless of how often you use them, and if they're only getting used once every month or two, you don't get your money's worth out of them. Heck, I still have the same corded Skilsaw I bought ten years ago, and I've gone through 4-5 cordless drills in that time.

I've more than paid off my tools and I'm nowhere near done with them. I understand what you're saying. As far as the maintenance goes, well, there is almost nothing you can't accomplish with the tools in the cordless set, coupled with the cheap basic hand tools mentioned throughout the thread and in Phil's article. Which he could get it all for an extra hundy or two. I guess it's up to him to decide whether to break the bank or not. Sometimes, it's a wise choice. It all depends on where his ambitions lie. Did he buy his dream house? Or a house that will serve as a base for his dream?

On the drill note...buy different drills, you get what you pay for. Unless you're willing to buy recondition goods, then you get a steal. I've bought plenty of things reconditioned, and know lots of people who have done the same, and in all of my or my friends experiences, we have yet to have a bad one. Come to think of it, I have yet to hear someone here at the planet bitch about one of the many refurb purchases they've made. It can be a good route to go as long as you do your research and always make sure it's factory refurbished w/ a warranty.

cdcox
06-10-2009, 11:35 PM
A ladder has been suggested a couple times. Definitely should be very high on your list. A 4-5 foot step ladder will be the most useful (easy to move from one spot to another and will allow you to do any indoor task on 8-ft ceilings).

Along the same lines, a 50-ft (100-ft even better) high-quality extension cord should also go on your list, but it can probably wait until you have corded power tools down the road.

You'll want a plunger before you get your first clog. The first time you get a clog that the plunger won't clear, get a hand-cranked snake. Will save you a fortune on plumber's bills.

Buy what you can for $300. Put additional items on your Christmas/Birthday list. You'll be surprised what you can acquire in a few years.

cdcox
06-10-2009, 11:40 PM
BTW, I went through the first 25 years of domestic life with the same corded drill. Got my first cordless drill less than a year ago. The corded drill is not nearly as convenient, but with a good extension cord it is an extremely workable option that is much cheaper than a decent cordless drill.

Phobia
06-10-2009, 11:44 PM
Ridgid cordless tools are fine. Never owned any reconditioned ones though. I bought a set of them twice and immediately sold them to people who worked with me.

I'm about 80% Dewalt 18V - their new Nano batteries are worth every nickel. The other 20% of my cordless operation is Hitachi 18V reconditioned and a 12V impact. I have about $450 in 3 drills, an impact and the aforementioned 12V impact. I've been pleased with them so far.

FAX
06-10-2009, 11:46 PM
Of course, if the lemur doesn't work, you can always just run down to the local pond and collect a fairly large bagfull of toads. Then, return to your new home, put on some heavy workboots (the ones with the steel heel things are best), stand directly in front of the main entranceway, and in a loud, authoritative tone, recite the words; "BEGONE, OH YE BASTARD SPIRITS FROM THIS PLACE OR THIS SHALT BE THINE FATE!!!", remove the toads from the bag, and stomp them until they are little more than puddles of green and red goo. Spirits will flee like there's no tomorrow when they see you do this.

Also, keep in mind that it's best that your new neighbors don't see you doing this.

FAX

Phobia
06-10-2009, 11:51 PM
re: ladder

Buy a multi-purpose ladder if possible.

This ladder is on sale this week -$30 at Costco, so $169 gets you into a Little Giant:
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?ProdID=11263001

PinkFloyd
06-11-2009, 01:40 AM
Well, a hammer is typically pretty important. Assuming you've got a yard, you'll probably want a shovel, rake, and that type of thing. Depending on whether or not you're including the big purchases in that $300, you're gonna need a lawn mower and weed eater, but those could eat up your $300 pretty quick.

Congrats on the house!

Get a goat !!!!

acesn8s
06-11-2009, 02:32 AM
Phillips head screwdriver
Standard screwdriver
Hammer

After this buy as needed.

And buy Craftsman. They have a lifetime warranty should you ever break them.

JOhn
06-11-2009, 02:38 AM
Get a goat !!!!

WOW!!!!

He is still alive. What's up bud, long time since I saw you post

Bwana
06-11-2009, 06:16 AM
The first thing you need to get, is a man fridge for the garage and or shop. Fill it with tasty quality beverages. (no swill) Craigslist is an acceptable method of obtaining this vital home necessity.

Congrats on the new home!

rockymtnchief
06-11-2009, 06:38 AM
Don't forget to check out pawn shops. Stick to name brands and have them plug them in first to make sure they work.

I once had a choice...drive 30 miles to get my drill or walk across the street and buy a $5 corded drill at a pawn shop. The pawn shop drill still works and is in my work truck 8 years later. Buy your bits and blades new, though. Dull, they can be aggravating or even dangerous.

aturnis
06-11-2009, 07:24 AM
Phillips head screwdriver
Standard screwdriver
Hammer

After this buy as needed.

And buy Craftsman. They have a lifetime warranty should you ever break them.

No longer holds true. I know for a fact there is np longer a lifetime warranty, even on cheap hand tools. Plus the quality has slipped drastically. I also hear their now made by Ryobi, and sold at k-mart. Consumer reports give their power tools terrible reviews.

arrowheadnation
06-11-2009, 08:10 AM
I haven't read anything else in this thread but if it hasn't been said already, I'll say it....Garage Sales my good man....Garage Sales. I got a rake, shovel, ho (lol), and a garden hose for $10 the other day.

Phobia
06-11-2009, 08:41 AM
Ryobi is fine for homeowner grade. Anything approaching daily or weekly use is going to immediately reduce their lifetime in quarters.

Fairplay
06-11-2009, 08:46 AM
The joy of home ownership.

Each year brings some project to work on.

aturnis
06-11-2009, 03:50 PM
I just returned a busted Craftsman socket not less than 2 weeks ago no questions asked. I have also had good luck with Ryobi tools.

huh? I just tried to return a broken tape measure, and they made me buy the replacement tape and fix it myself.:hmmm:

aturnis
06-11-2009, 03:52 PM
also ryobi's lithium ion impact driver is suppose to be top notch.

Bugeater
06-11-2009, 03:55 PM
I got to thinking about the number of things I actually have duct tape on. Currently in my house I have duct tape on my duct work and the clothes dryer vent hose. My wife did use it to get rid of a planter’s wart on her toe. Other than that what have you guy’s fixed with it? <o>:p</o>:p
It would take me less time to list the things I haven't fixed with it.

DeezNutz
06-11-2009, 03:56 PM
Ladder.

Halfcan
06-11-2009, 04:31 PM
congrats

Simply Red
06-11-2009, 04:32 PM
congrats man!

DeezNutz
06-11-2009, 04:38 PM
Oh, and congrats! Home ownership is great.

Stanley Nickels
06-11-2009, 06:02 PM
So, just got back from the new house. There was a tiny puddle in the basement, and a slight smell of mildew-- NO GOOD! We'll have to see whether that was a leak from the AC unit (where the puddle was located), or a product of the high amounts of rain...

Anyway, got my "list" from Chiefsplanet, and a ladder-- check my fourth post or so where I put down my shopping list-- and got everything for around 200. I'm lucky in that my parents are taking me to Lowe's tomorrow to buy me a lawnmower, as a housewarming gift.

When I view the house through the eyes of a homeowner, instead of a prospective home buyer, I see so many little things that I now realize will be *my* responsibility, and I know I've got a lot of work to do. The house is about 70 years old, so there's plenty to be done... but this thread got me thinking in a different way than before.. I used to mock the idea of a "mancave", but I relish in the thought of learning how to maintain an older house, all the while having some "guy time" in the process.

Thanks again to everyone!

Rain Man
06-11-2009, 07:09 PM
I finished my 11-year rehab two years ago. Now I need to repaint the living room. And the great cycle begins anew.

stlchiefs
06-11-2009, 07:44 PM
huh? I just tried to return a broken tape measure, and they made me buy the replacement tape and fix it myself.:hmmm:

I've read online they won't replace tape measures anymore because so many people abused it by breaking the tape when it was getting worn in order to just get a new one.

Buehler445
06-11-2009, 10:31 PM
Congratulations! Take the fuck care of it. It's yours now.

every male past the age of 18 should have a tool box with basic tools. Go to sears and pick up a small kit you don't need anything fancy a hammer a few screw drivers an adjustable wrench and a pair of vice grips

This. X a billion

Buy a good ladder. You'll use it for a billion things, and you'll thank us both now and later.

This should be the very first thing you buy. Hopefully you got some.

Keep accumulating tools. Try to pick shit up on sale. Little by little, you can set yourself up pretty well.

I'd suggest just making a ginormous list, and make it a living document. Cross shit off when you get it and add more when you think of it.

Tools are ALWAYS a waste of money until you need them. Then they are worth their weight in Gold.

acesn8s
06-12-2009, 01:49 AM
No longer holds true. I know for a fact there is np longer a lifetime warranty, even on cheap hand tools. Plus the quality has slipped drastically. I also hear their now made by Ryobi, and sold at k-mart. Consumer reports give their power tools terrible reviews.According to their website there is a lifetime warranty. The reason Craftsman is being sold in Kmart is because Sears and Kmart merged years ago.