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banyon
06-14-2009, 11:10 AM
The underworked American
Jun 11th 2009
From The Economist print edition

Children are exceptions to the country’s work ethic

http://www.economist.com/world/unitedstates/displayStory.cfm?story_id=13825184

http://media.economist.com/images/20090613/D2409US0.jpg

AMERICANS like to think of themselves as martyrs to work. They delight in telling stories about their punishing hours, snatched holidays and ever-intrusive BlackBerrys. At this time of the year they marvel at the laziness of their European cousins, particularly the French. Did you know that the French take the whole of August off to recover from their 35-hour work weeks? Have you heard that they are so addicted to their holidays that they leave the sick to die and the dead to moulder?

There is an element of exaggeration in this, of course, and not just about French burial habits; studies show that Americans are less Stakhanovite than they think. Still, the average American gets only four weeks of paid leave a year compared with seven for the French and eight for the Germans. In Paris many shops simply close down for August; in Washington, where the weather is sweltering, they remain open, some for 24 hours a day.

But when it comes to the young the situation is reversed. American children have it easier than most other children in the world, including the supposedly lazy Europeans. They have one of the shortest school years anywhere, a mere 180 days compared with an average of 195 for OECD countries and more than 200 for East Asian countries. German children spend 20 more days in school than American ones, and South Koreans over a month more. Over 12 years, a 15-day deficit means American children lose out on 180 days of school, equivalent to an entire year.

American children also have one of the shortest school days, six-and-a-half hours, adding up to 32 hours a week. By contrast, the school week is 37 hours in Luxembourg, 44 in Belgium, 53 in Denmark and 60 in Sweden. On top of that, American children do only about an hour’s-worth of homework a day, a figure that stuns the Japanese and Chinese.

Americans also divide up their school time oddly. They cram the school day into the morning and early afternoon, and close their schools for three months in the summer. The country that tut-tuts at Europe’s mega-holidays thinks nothing of giving its children such a lazy summer. But the long summer vacation acts like a mental eraser, with the average child reportedly forgetting about a month’s-worth of instruction in many subjects and almost three times that in mathematics. American academics have even invented a term for this phenomenon, “summer learning loss”. This pedagogical understretch is exacerbating social inequalities. Poorer children frequently have no one to look after them in the long hours between the end of the school day and the end of the average working day. They are also particularly prone to learning loss. They fall behind by an average of over two months in their reading. Richer children actually improve their performance.

The understretch is also leaving American children ill-equipped to compete. They usually perform poorly in international educational tests, coming behind Asian countries that spend less on education but work their children harder. California’s state universities have to send over a third of their entering class to take remedial courses in English and maths. At least a third of successful PhD students come from abroad.

A growing number of politicians from both sides of the aisle are waking up to the problem. Barack Obama has urged school administrators to “rethink the school day”, arguing that “we can no longer afford an academic calendar designed for when America was a nation of farmers who needed their children at home ploughing the land at the end of each day.” Newt Gingrich has trumpeted a documentary arguing that Chinese and Indian children are much more academic than American ones.

These politicians have no shortage of evidence that America’s poor educational performance is weakening its economy. A recent report from McKinsey, a management consultancy, argues that the lagging performance of the country’s school pupils, particularly its poor and minority children, has wreaked more devastation on the economy than the current recession.

Learning the lesson
A growing number of schools are already doing what Mr Obama urges, and experimenting with lengthening the school day. About 1,000 of the country’s 90,000 schools have broken the shackles of the regular school day. In particular, charter schools in the Knowledge is Power Programme (KIPP) start the school day at 7.30am and end at 5pm, hold classes on some Saturdays and teach for a couple of weeks in the summer. All in all, KIPP students get about 60% more class time than their peers and routinely score better in tests.

Still, American schoolchildren are unlikely to end up working as hard as the French, let alone the South Koreans, any time soon. There are institutional reasons for this. The federal government has only a limited influence over the school system. Powerful interest groups, most notably the teachers’ unions, but also the summer-camp industry, have a vested interest in the status quo. But reformers are also up against powerful cultural forces.

One is sentimentality; the archetypical American child is Huckleberry Finn, who had little taste for formal education. Another is complacency. American parents have led grass-root protests against attempts to extend the school year into August or July, or to increase the amount of homework their little darlings have to do. They still find it hard to believe that all those Chinese students, beavering away at their books, will steal their children’s jobs. But Huckleberry Finn was published in 1884. And brain work is going the way of manual work, to whoever will provide the best value for money. The next time Americans make a joke about the Europeans and their taste for la dolce vita, they ought to take a look a bit closer to home

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:14 AM
scores are still terrible. At least Mexico is there to bring up the rear.

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:15 AM
7-5, 365, 2 week vacations is the plan I'd prefer

NCarlsCorner2
06-14-2009, 11:20 AM
Just what the Dems want, year round brainwashing.

NewChief
06-14-2009, 11:21 AM
Lengthening time in school isn't going to be effective unless there's reform of what occurs during the school day. Making kids sit longer in ineffective classrooms geared toward making them pass poor assessments won't help our country or economy. The problem isn't in the amount of time spent, it's in how the time is spent.

Read Tony Wagner's Global Achievement Gap if you want a good picture of how education needs to change.

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:34 AM
Just what the Dems want, year round brainwashing.

We should just do away with schools altogether and kids can just learn by watching TV with dad at home. Is that pretty much your plan?

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:34 AM
Lengthening time in school isn't going to be effective unless there's reform of what occurs during the school day. Making kids sit longer in ineffective classrooms geared toward making them pass poor assessments won't help our country or economy. The problem isn't in the amount of time spent, it's in how the time is spent.

Read Tony Wagner's Global Achievement Gap if you want a good picture of how education needs to change.

I agree that the reform needs to be comprehensive and that this is only part of the problem.

NewChief
06-14-2009, 11:37 AM
I agree that the reform needs to be comprehensive and that this is only part of the problem.

I know you're interested in education because you post about it quite a bit. As such, I really think you should read Wagner's book when you get a chance. It does a great job of explaining the state of education, how we got there, and where we should go from here in order to compete in the future and shape the global economy.

NCarlsCorner2
06-14-2009, 11:40 AM
We should just do away with schools altogether and kids can just learn by watching TV with dad at home. Is that pretty much your plan?

No, my plan is to teach kids what they need to excel in life instead of political views slanted to the left.

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:52 AM
No, my plan is to teach kids what they need to excel in life instead of political views slanted to the left.

yeah, that's the problem in school too much education about politics. :rolleyes:

We barely even teach anything about government in schools anymore. Everything's been slashed in a desperate attempt to get science and math and reading scores up.

banyon
06-14-2009, 11:53 AM
I know you're interested in education because you post about it quite a bit. As such, I really think you should read Wagner's book when you get a chance. It does a great job of explaining the state of education, how we got there, and where we should go from here in order to compete in the future and shape the global economy.

I'll put it on the list. The Black Swan is next though.

NewChief
06-14-2009, 11:55 AM
yeah, that's the problem in school too much education about politics. :rolleyes:

We barely even teach anything about government in schools anymore. Everything's been slashed in a desperate attempt to get science and math and reading scores up.

Wagner has a great chapter where he talks about how the formerly robust, performance-based curriculum of a school was dismantled and replaced with a narrow, fact-based curriculum because of a political disagreement over perceived politicization of what was being taught.

Here:
http://books.google.com/books?id=V8NmJXDQMBMC&pg=PA121&lpg=PA121&dq=tony+wagner+on+kentucky+curriculum&source=bl&ots=AaWhuIGUK9&sig=FuKcZIi6qAWh73wjoGyC_RMuwr4&hl=en&ei=Uys1SonqOY7KMqDCsPcJ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1

Start on pg 121. It's only like 3 pages long.

Jenson71
06-14-2009, 11:55 AM
No, my plan is to teach kids what they need to excel in life instead of political views slanted to the left.

Biology is a liberal concept designed to embed equality falsely in minorities. It needs to go.

whoman69
06-14-2009, 11:58 AM
Lengthening time in school isn't going to be effective unless there's reform of what occurs during the school day. Making kids sit longer in ineffective classrooms geared toward making them pass poor assessments won't help our country or economy. The problem isn't in the amount of time spent, it's in how the time is spent.

Read Tony Wagner's Global Achievement Gap if you want a good picture of how education needs to change.

I think we have given into parent's notion that their kids are entitled to good grades. When I worked in NATO HQ the Europeans would take a break every hour for 10 minutes. We are definitely passing that kind of work ethic onto our kids. When my oldest son was going through high school and we'd get reports on the kids. Almost every class that he was in the class average was an A-. I know they didn't have that big a grasp on what they were doing. I think we need to stop treating them like coddled brats and give them a chance to push themselves. Right now I think that teachers are satisfied to have their students somewhere in the middle.

They are still kids. They deserve their summer. While they're in school they should be working to get their homework done.

NCarlsCorner2
06-14-2009, 12:02 PM
yeah, that's the problem in school too much education about politics. :rolleyes:

We barely even teach anything about government in schools anymore. Everything's been slashed in a desperate attempt to get science and math and reading scores up.

I put my youngest son in a private school after the public school that he was going to held a mock election and strongly suggested for him to vote for all of the Democrats, no they dont teach politics in public schools at all.

Now he's learning how to run a business, how to balance a checkbook and other things to help him succeed in life.

|Zach|
06-14-2009, 12:03 PM
Biology is a liberal concept designed to embed equality falsely in minorities. It needs to go.

:D

banyon
06-14-2009, 12:10 PM
I put my youngest son in a private school after the public school that he was going to held a mock election and strongly suggested for him to vote for all of the Democrats, no they dont teach politics in public schools at all.

Now he's learning how to run a business, how to balance a checkbook and other things to help him succeed in life.

That was what your kid did every day at school was hold mock elections?
Who encouraged him to "vote for all the Democrats"?

My private school third grade class held a mock election where Reagan won by a landslide, yet I managed to get an education despite the trauma that inflicted on me.

Also "how to run a business"? What grade school level class is that?

banyon
06-14-2009, 12:16 PM
Wagner has a great chapter where he talks about how the formerly robust, performance-based curriculum of a school was dismantled and replaced with a narrow, fact-based curriculum because of a political disagreement over perceived politicization of what was being taught.

Here:
http://books.google.com/books?id=V8NmJXDQMBMC&pg=PA121&lpg=PA121&dq=tony+wagner+on+kentucky+curriculum&source=bl&ots=AaWhuIGUK9&sig=FuKcZIi6qAWh73wjoGyC_RMuwr4&hl=en&ei=Uys1SonqOY7KMqDCsPcJ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1

Start on pg 121. It's only like 3 pages long.

"Critical thinking skills"= "Teaching people to be critical of church"

That sounds like a sentiment that NCarlsCorner could probably get behind.

Thig Lyfe
06-14-2009, 12:17 PM
Lengthening time in school isn't going to be effective unless there's reform of what occurs during the school day. Making kids sit longer in ineffective classrooms geared toward making them pass poor assessments won't help our country or economy. The problem isn't in the amount of time spent, it's in how the time is spent.


Yep. I know if I were a kid, I'd hate having more hours of non-engaging, irrelevant, poorly-taught bullshit piled on just because South Korea grinds their kids down until they're no longer willing to live.

And this article completely ignores the importance of extra-curricular activities to American children. If anything, the average American kid is already overscheduled. It's not like these kids just go home at 3 and do nothing. There are hours and hours of sports practices, music or theater or dance rehearsals, tutoring sessions and (in the case of high schoolers) after-school jobs that would be affected by an increase in school hours and days. The Economist would love its readers to believe that every or even most American kids are like the fatass in that cartoon, but it's really not true.

That's not to say that there aren't a lot of kids who are way behind academically. There are. But it's an issue of quality, not quantity.



No, my plan is to teach kids what they need to excel in life instead of political views slanted to the left.

Hahahaha you're a fucking moron.

Thig Lyfe
06-14-2009, 12:21 PM
I put my youngest son in a private school after the public school that he was going to held a mock election and strongly suggested for him to vote for all of the Democrats, no they dont teach politics in public schools at all.



Wow, what a great sample size. You proved your point beyond a shadow of a doubt. :rolleyes:

It couldn't be that you mistook a basic role-playing exercise for political indoctrination. You know, part of the room is assigned to one side of an argument and the other part is assigned to another, and they argue for that side. To improve critical thinking skills. Or is that not something that could help him excel in real life?

Brock
06-14-2009, 12:54 PM
I'd say no to getting rid of summer vacation. I like being able to take off with the kids whenever and go the lake or the mountains or whatever.

SNR
06-14-2009, 01:56 PM
Yep. I know if I were a kid, I'd hate having more hours of non-engaging, irrelevant, poorly-taught bullshit piled on just because South Korea grinds their kids down until they're no longer willing to live.

And this article completely ignores the importance of extra-curricular activities to American children. If anything, the average American kid is already overscheduled. It's not like these kids just go home at 3 and do nothing. There are hours and hours of sports practices, music or theater or dance rehearsals, tutoring sessions and (in the case of high schoolers) after-school jobs that would be affected by an increase in school hours and days. The Economist would love its readers to believe that every or even most American kids are like the fatass in that cartoon, but it's really not true.

That's not to say that there aren't a lot of kids who are way behind academically. There are. But it's an issue of quality, not quantity. For me, this model worked out extremely well. I was also lucky enough to grow up in a school district where my high school had 4 choirs, 3 bands, 2 jazz bands, and 2 orchestras. Yes, all at the same school. Orchestra wasn't cut to pay for new textbooks or anything like that. It was invaluable having that kind of extra-cirricular time to do what I do today.

But again, just because I benefitted from it and was in a school district where that was possible, doesn't mean the other school districts have this kind of success with the arts. Most arts programs are being cut in schools, leaving just the bare bones of classes left. Not every kid has that opportunity anymore.

banyon
06-14-2009, 01:59 PM
I'd say no to getting rid of summer vacation. I like being able to take off with the kids whenever and go the lake or the mountains or whatever.

How long do you go on these trips for?

Chiefspants
06-14-2009, 02:05 PM
As a Sixteen year old highschool student, it should not come as a surprise that I disagree with extending the school year, but I feel as if I can provide a few reasons to competently defend my position.
As I sit here typing my post in this thread, I find myself not in my air conditioned home while watching an episode of the office, but in the hotel with other national qualifiers from my school on a trip to nationals for debate and forensics. I know that many people roll their eyes when they hear that I am active in these activities. However, I feel that the skills I am learning are essential, Keeping up with current events while spurring my mind to continuously learn and gaining the ability to justify my position will be crucial when I become an adult in this world.
Now, I know that many of my peers are not spending their summer competing at national tournaments, but other close friends of mine are working two jobs, another close friend is writing a novel, one is preparing for a 26 mile marathon (She's a straight A student.) While another is taking college classes in her free time.
The point is, while many American students may be falling behind in the summer, thats definitely not a call for an Ayn Rand Dystopian like style of education, 7-5, with well over 200 days of school. In the contrary, I feel I actually much more in the summer on my own accord rather than when some of my teachers who are teaching the same class they taught 27 years ago. (In Biology this year I had about 25 free days, watched planet earth most of those days, I also missed over 40 days of school with academic activities, I had a 99 in that class, but curiously did "average" on the state assessment)
However, I am not blind to the numbness summer brings on many of my peers, and I feel there is a potential solution. My mother, a teacher herself, has had to deal with the mind numbing affect summer has had on her kids. She has thought up a way to continue the much needed time off that we have now. (Some peers give me strife because apparently I believe its more important to know something than throw something, and because I flatly refused to get stoned or wasted with them as they leech upon the world. And It’s a wonder why I dislike public high school?
She believes that a possible solution would be having no school in July. (While having school in June and August.) Taking out school in December, (My mother contends that her kids are so excited about christmas it's almost impossible to teach anything during that month anyways.) And Taking out school in March as well, (Spring break, coupled with easter, present a myriad of distractions for the children and the teacher in the classroom.) Overall, most of the mind numbing effect of summer would be limited, and Americans could also have the chance to catch up academically as well.
As someone has stated above however, Even if we enhance school tremendously, what really is that going to do when some of the teachers are only there to receive his/her 35,000 dollars a year? My math teacher had 60% of one of his classed failing and did nothing to try to spur them to change. My spanish teacher pushed kids out of the way when 3 o'clock rolled around so he could get to his "Sports practices". And when basketball/tennis season rolled around, we would get to watch movies in spanish every monday/wednesday/friday. While the other spanish teacher was actually teaching her classes how to speak the Language, and you wonder why barely anyone in his class achieved while about the same amount of kids in her class failed to receive an A?
As long as sports are sanctified in our highschools in favor of academics, and suitless teachers are still allowed to teach, extending the school year will do nothing but increase the struggles those striving to succeed have to face in public school.
Anyways, I am done, if anyone burdened themselves to read this, Thank you for taking the time.

J Diddy
06-14-2009, 02:24 PM
I put my youngest son in a private school after the public school that he was going to held a mock election and strongly suggested for him to vote for all of the Democrats, no they dont teach politics in public schools at all.

Now he's learning how to run a business, how to balance a checkbook and other things to help him succeed in life.

That is the stupidest thing I've ever heard. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, ever. I am assuming that your youngest is in elementary and will not be voting for sometime. Do you think that someone elses political excercise will trump the several years of knowledge he will acquire, hopefully, before he understands politics and makes his decision and casts his vote?

Seems like you're more upset that they're not pushing him to vote for all the republicans than the actual excercise.

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:29 PM
I think a longer school day or year is a bad idea. They need a break outside in fresh air with the natural environment with space around them and hopefully with physical activities. They need to explore some of the world and life on their own and create things on their own, in their own time and space. This makes them sharper and fresher.


Being inside most of the day with short breaks outside isn't healthy. And being in the clutches of the state that long is not good for them either.
They need to spend some time with their families too.

J Diddy
06-14-2009, 02:30 PM
As a Sixteen year old highschool student, it should not come as a surprise that I disagree with extending the school year, but I feel as if I can provide a few reasons to competently defend my position.
As I sit here typing my post in this thread, I find myself not in my air conditioned home while watching an episode of the office, but in the hotel with other national qualifiers from my school on a trip to nationals for debate and forensics. I know that many people roll their eyes when they hear that I am active in these activities. However, I feel that the skills I am learning are essential, Keeping up with current events while spurring my mind to continuously learn and gaining the ability to justify my position will be crucial when I become an adult in this world.
Now, I know that many of my peers are not spending their summer competing at national tournaments, but other close friends of mine are working two jobs, another close friend is writing a novel, one is preparing for a 26 mile marathon (She's a straight A student.) While another is taking college classes in her free time.
The point is, while many American students may be falling behind in the summer, thats definitely not a call for an Ayn Rand Dystopian like style of education, 7-5, with well over 200 days of school. In the contrary, I feel I actually much more in the summer on my own accord rather than when some of my teachers who are teaching the same class they taught 27 years ago. (In Biology this year I had about 25 free days, watched planet earth most of those days, I also missed over 40 days of school with academic activities, I had a 99 in that class, but curiously did "average" on the state assessment)
However, I am not blind to the numbness summer brings on many of my peers, and I feel there is a potential solution. My mother, a teacher herself, has had to deal with the mind numbing affect summer has had on her kids. She has thought up a way to continue the much needed time off that we have now. (Some peers give me strife because apparently I believe its more important to know something than throw something, and because I flatly refused to get stoned or wasted with them as they leech upon the world. And It’s a wonder why I dislike public high school?
She believes that a possible solution would be having no school in July. (While having school in June and August.) Taking out school in December, (My mother contends that her kids are so excited about christmas it's almost impossible to teach anything during that month anyways.) And Taking out school in March as well, (Spring break, coupled with easter, present a myriad of distractions for the children and the teacher in the classroom.) Overall, most of the mind numbing effect of summer would be limited, and Americans could also have the chance to catch up academically as well.
As someone has stated above however, Even if we enhance school tremendously, what really is that going to do when some of the teachers are only there to receive his/her 35,000 dollars a year? My math teacher had 60% of one of his classed failing and did nothing to try to spur them to change. My spanish teacher pushed kids out of the way when 3 o'clock rolled around so he could get to his "Sports practices". And when basketball/tennis season rolled around, we would get to watch movies in spanish every monday/wednesday/friday. While the other spanish teacher was actually teaching her classes how to speak the Language, and you wonder why barely anyone in his class achieved while about the same amount of kids in her class failed to receive an A?
As long as sports are sanctified in our highschools in favor of academics, and suitless teachers are still allowed to teach, extending the school year will do nothing but increase the struggles those striving to succeed have to face in public school.
Anyways, I am done, if anyone burdened themselves to read this, Thank you for taking the time.

You seem to have a good head on your shoulders. You seem to also know what you want when you grow up. These are all good things.

That being said, I think it would be pointless to lengthen the school year without making more agressive changes to the curriculum.

WoodDraw
06-14-2009, 02:30 PM
That was what your kid did every day at school was hold mock elections?
Who encouraged him to "vote for all the Democrats"?

My private school third grade class held a mock election where Reagan won by a landslide, yet I managed to get an education despite the trauma that inflicted on me.

Also "how to run a business"? What grade school level class is that?

Yeash, no kidding. I remember having a mock election every Presidential election during school. I think I voted for whoever my dad did every time. A hypnotist couldn't get me to remember who won the mock elections.

I seem to have survived somehow.

Brock
06-14-2009, 02:30 PM
How long do you go on these trips for?

As long as we feel like.

J Diddy
06-14-2009, 02:31 PM
I think a longer school day or year is a bad idea. They need a break outside in fresh air with the natural environment with space around them and hopefully with physical activities. They need to explore some of the world and life on their own and create things on their own, in their own time and space. This makes them sharper and fresher.


Being inside most of the day with short breaks outside isn't healthy. And being in the clutches of the state that long is not good for them either.
They need to spend some time with their families too.


Oh lord, you're making it sound like them attending school is equivalent to a concentration camp.

"clutches of the state"

ROFL

banyon
06-14-2009, 02:32 PM
As long as we feel like.

Longer than a month?

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:35 PM
I put my youngest son in a private school after the public school that he was going to held a mock election and strongly suggested for him to vote for all of the Democrats, no they dont teach politics in public schools at all.

Now he's learning how to run a business, how to balance a checkbook and other things to help him succeed in life.

You are absolutely right. The curriculum is full of pc curriculum most of it done in an insidious hard to spot manner. It's even in some of the social studies textbooks and health curriculums.

My kid, now 15 was in private schools but graduated this January from hers. I am now home schooling her ( I work part time) and she is learning free enterprise economics and personal economics as well as the Constitution. She finished Atlas Shrugged and wrote a book report tying it into today. I couldn't believe she wrote it. Now she's learning how to write a short story. studying the religions of the world and the French Revolution while she reads a Tale of Two Cities. Classics. She loves it.

Wants to be a professional that can work into her own business instead of just being a helpless woiker. Or a bureaucrat. She understands what caused the financial crisis, money creation and inflation. I can pull this off as she is a strong independent student from her years at her school. Next she wants to do an architectural apprenticeship. I can tailor it to her interests and what I want her to know politically and my values. Exactly what the state doesn't want. It's about control.

J Diddy
06-14-2009, 02:35 PM
Longer than a month?


If he feels like it, then yes.

Brock
06-14-2009, 02:36 PM
Longer than a month?

The length of time is less important than the freedom of doing it whenever we want to.

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:38 PM
Oh lord, you're making it sound like them attending school is equivalent to a concentration camp.

"clutches of the state"

ROFL

It is. Captive audiences that are being conditioned.

banyon
06-14-2009, 02:39 PM
The length of time is less important than the freedom of doing it whenever we want to.

I guess I'm trying to see why your unspecified schedule wouldn't allow for the same activities with 4 or 5 2 week breaks dispersed throughout the year, which is what most of these proposals generally envision.

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:41 PM
Oh yeah, and I'm bringing her to the Imperial City on the Potomac this fall to visit our congress (including to get a visit to Ron Paul). She'll learn all about Lincoln that won't get taught in public school too. Tee Hee! Monticello is on the list as well.

banyon
06-14-2009, 02:42 PM
It is. Captive audiences that are being conditioned.

Your plan of dismantling public education and turning back the clock to 1820 or whatever where only the wealthy kids go to school isn't going to work. Sorry. No matter how many ridiculous strawman-type holocaust comparisons you throw up. Not to mention the fact that the countries that are beating the pants off us all have vastly more centralized and nationalized education systems than we do and your preferred abolition of government involvement hasn't worked anywhere, ever. period.

banyon
06-14-2009, 02:44 PM
Oh yeah, and I'm bringing her to the Imperial City on the Potomac this fall to visit our congress (including to get a visit to Ron Paul). She'll learn all about Lincoln that won't get taught in public school too. Tee Hee! Monticello is on the list as well.

Oh God, you're going to tell her he was a rapist. That won't make her weird or anything.

Brock
06-14-2009, 02:46 PM
I guess I'm trying to see why your unspecified schedule wouldn't allow for the same activities with 4 or 5 2 week breaks dispersed throughout the year, which is what most of these proposals generally envision.

Because of the predictability of summer weather.

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:56 PM
I have to admit I could dig the kids having their summer vacation here in March, April and May instead because summer is like your winter. We try not to go out. Better to stay in the central AC in a building. It's just too hot. The kids can't run around as easily. The exception is being in a pool or at the beach, which can also be unbearable as the water can get as warm as a bath.

BucEyedPea
06-14-2009, 02:59 PM
I still think an extended break for nine weeks is better for them than shorter breaks during the year with a longer school day. Even if the summer break is a hold over from being an agrarian society.