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FAX
06-16-2009, 11:09 PM
... down at the old Ryman Auditorium. Great seats. Great show.

His band consisted of Mandolin, Fiddle/Banjo, Lap Slide Guitar, Acoustic Bass, Acoustic Guitar, and Accordian. Hell of a show. Lots of old stuff and new ... all freshly arranged for this band. Told lots of stories and did some audience calls.

The Ryman is a great room for him. Small and raucous. He could relax and jam without worrying about trying to please anybody. The encore consisted of about 8 songs. Awesome job by a songwriting genius.

FAX

big nasty kcnut
06-17-2009, 04:12 AM
Did he do radžo or accident can happen.
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penchief
06-17-2009, 07:33 AM
Lucky you. Elvis Costello is one of my all time favorites. Great songwriter.

FAX
06-17-2009, 11:56 AM
Neither of those, Mr. kcnut. Or "Allison" or whatever that one's called. Lots of brand new stuff and a couple of classics ... but neither of those, unfortunately.

Yeah, Mr. penchief, he is a phenomenal songwriter. This was a perfect room for him, the Ryman is small and he could just relax and be himself. There was a lot of love for him, the place was packed, and he obviously enjoyed himself. It was good to see.

FAX

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 11:57 AM
Elvis is absolutely amazing. His genius is sadly overlooked by the American public.

penchief
06-17-2009, 12:04 PM
His genius is sadly overlooked by the American public.

Yes it is. And I can't understand why either. There are a lot of people like my brother (a bit of a rock/blues historian) who love all the classic stuff but just don't seem to appreciate Elvis Costello as much.

Stewie
06-17-2009, 12:07 PM
I saw Elvis when he opened for the Police last year. After they figured out the sound problems during the second song it was a great show. Too bad he didn't play Allison. That was the best song of the set and Sting joined him for it. Amazingly, those two voices melded very well.

RJ
06-17-2009, 12:20 PM
Color me jealous.

Elvis Costello and Lyle Lovett are my favorites to see live. EC doesn't come around so often these day.

FAX
06-17-2009, 12:20 PM
Elvis is somewhat of an acquired taste, I think. He has a particular style that, to some people, might not seem ... I don't know ... "serious". A lot of his music has a subtle, "tongue in cheek" attitude.

I was surprised by his pipes last night. He had great range and power.

The best thing about it was that you could tell he felt "at home". It's not the first time he's played the Ryman and that audience really loves him. I just enjoyed watching him have a good time with his little acoustic band. They jammed on several tunes and, as I mentioned, the encore went on for a long, long time.

You go, Elvis.

FAX

FAX
06-17-2009, 12:44 PM
Color me jealous.

Elvis Costello and Lyle Lovett are my favorites to see live. EC doesn't come around so often these day.

I've never seen Lyle Lovett. I've had several opportunities, it just never worked out. I've seen Elvis many times, though. In several career iterations.

It's not unusual for rock/pop artists to turn to Nashville in the twilight of their careers, and I guess that's what he's doing. I don't know him personally. The interesting thing is that his music really works well with an acoustic, semi-bluegrass arrangement. The vocals were as you would expect, but the band was made up of country session guys and the arrangements were, for the most part, light.

He's hung around Nashville a lot, so I'm guessing he's either exploring those influences or just trying to find a new audience. The new stuff still had "dark" aspects, though. References to death, execution, guns, knives, etc. Like traditional country "train/prison/booze/good love gone bad" stuff on steroids.

FAX

Donger
06-17-2009, 12:46 PM
Elvis Costello's voice makes me want to beat small children. It always has, too. There's just something about it, but I hate it.

gblowfish
06-17-2009, 12:54 PM
Elvis is King.
His Aim Is True.

FAX
06-17-2009, 01:12 PM
Elvis Costello's voice makes me want to beat small children. It always has, too. There's just something about it, but I hate it.

I can understand that, Mr. Donger. When I first heard him, I had a similar reaction. I would think, however, that his lyrics would appeal to a person like you. They are often very intelligent and the musical construction of his many of his tunes is both sophisticated and sometimes even progressive.

He's an unusual cat and he hasn't given an inch in pursuit of his artistry. That deserves props, if nothing else.

FAX

RJ
06-17-2009, 01:18 PM
Elvis Costello's voice makes me want to beat small children. It always has, too. There's just something about it, but I hate it.


Maybe it's his British accent.

Donger
06-17-2009, 01:21 PM
I can understand that, Mr. Donger. When I first heard him, I had a similar reaction. I would think, however, that his lyrics would appeal to a person like you. They are often very intelligent and the musical construction of his many of his tunes is both sophisticated and sometimes even progressive.

He's an unusual cat and he hasn't given an inch in pursuit of his artistry. That deserves props, if nothing else.

FAX

I don't pay attention to the lyrics of songs, for the most part.

Donger
06-17-2009, 01:37 PM
Maybe it's his British accent.

Heh. I didn't know he was a Brit. I assumed he was American.

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 02:07 PM
I don't pay attention to the lyrics of songs, for the most part.

Wow.

Lyrics and melody are pretty much everything.

Would you consider yourself to be a music fan or casual listener?

Donger
06-17-2009, 02:09 PM
Wow.

Lyrics and melody are pretty much everything.

Would you consider yourself to be a music fan or casual listener?

I suppose a casual listener. I don't see why I would care what the musician is saying, as long as it is pleasing to the ear.

Consistent1
06-17-2009, 02:25 PM
Elvis is absolutely amazing. His genius is sadly overlooked by the American public.


Shit man, you stole my fire. I was going to ask if you were there with him. I couldn't even get to the second page man.

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 02:36 PM
I suppose a casual listener. I don't see why I would care what the musician is saying, as long as it is pleasing to the ear.

Interesting.

The lyric is the most important thing to 99% of all music listeners.

People didn't love the Beatles because of their chord structures. They love(d) them because of what their lyrics said and how those lyrics spoke to millions (if not billions) of people.

People don't listen to the Ramones to hear the same three chords in every song. They listen to them because of what they have to say. The same could be said for U2, The Eagles, Hank Williams, etc. and all the way back to Gershwin.

I've rarely met anyone (outside of technically advance musician) that doesn't care about lyrics.

Thanks for your input. :thumb:

Donger
06-17-2009, 02:42 PM
Interesting.

The lyric is the most important thing to 99% of all music listeners.

People didn't love the Beatles because of their chord structures. They love(d) them because of what their lyrics said and how those lyrics spoke to millions (if not billions) of people.

People don't listen to the Ramones to hear the same three chords in every song. They listen to them because of what they have to say. The same could be said for U2, The Eagles, Hank Williams, etc. and all the way back to Gershwin.

I've rarely met anyone (outside of technically advance musician) that doesn't care about lyrics.

Thanks for your input. :thumb:

If I cared about what the musician was trying to get across with the words of the song, I'd just buy the lyrics and read them. I don't listen to music for that purpose. I listen to music to enjoy the sound.

That's probably why I've always liked movie soundtracks. No words cluttering up the music.

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 02:46 PM
If I cared about what the musician was trying to get across with the words of the song, I'd just buy the lyrics and read them. I don't listen to music for that purpose. I listen to music to enjoy the sound.

That's probably why I've always liked movie soundtracks. No words cluttering up the music.

Do you enjoy listening to instrumental artists? Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Larry Carlton, Al DiMeola, Chick Corea, Return to Forever, Allan Holdsworth, Joe Satriani, Weather Report, Jaco Pastorious, Jeff Berlin, Dave Grusin, etc.?

Donger
06-17-2009, 02:49 PM
Do you enjoy listening to instrumental artists? Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Larry Carlton, Al DiMeola, Chick Corea, Return to Forever, Allan Holdsworth, Joe Satriani, Weather Report, Jaco Pastorious, Jeff Berlin, Dave Grusin, etc.?

No, because I've never heard of any of them, let alone listened to their music.

penchief
06-17-2009, 03:06 PM
I can understand that, Mr. Donger. When I first heard him, I had a similar reaction. I would think, however, that his lyrics would appeal to a person like you. They are often very intelligent and the musical construction of his many of his tunes is both sophisticated and sometimes even progressive.

He's an unusual cat and he hasn't given an inch in pursuit of his artistry. That deserves props, if nothing else.

FAX

I agree. He's a lyrical genius, IMO. And the way he vocalizes his lyrics gives his music a style that makes him very unique. "Motel Matches" is a good example and one of my favorite Elvis songs.

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 03:10 PM
No, because I've never heard of any of them, let alone listened to their music.

Ah

FAX
06-17-2009, 03:13 PM
Couldn't agree more, Mr. penchief.

In an effort to expand your knowledge on matters cultural, Mr. Donger, allow me to suggest that you google the lyrics to a couple of his songs ... say ... Hora Decubitus or The Sharpest Thorn. You'll quickly see what we're talking about. He commands a turn of the phrase that is unique in pop/rock music. It's more akin to true poetry than typical pop lyrics. The peep has a muse, man.

FAX

Donger
06-17-2009, 03:30 PM
Couldn't agree more, Mr. penchief.

In an effort to expand your knowledge on matters cultural, Mr. Donger, allow me to suggest that you google the lyrics to a couple of his songs ... say ... Hora Decubitus or The Sharpest Thorn. You'll quickly see what we're talking about. He commands a turn of the phrase that is unique in pop/rock music. It's more akin to true poetry than typical pop lyrics. The peep has a muse, man.

FAX

I looked up Hora Decubitus. May as well have been written in Greek. And I can't read Greek.

FAX
06-17-2009, 03:33 PM
With great sadness, I declare you to be entirely hopeless, Mr. Donger.

I was my legs of you.

FAX

DaneMcCloud
06-17-2009, 04:03 PM
With great sadness, I declare you to be entirely hopeless, Mr. Donger.

I was my legs of you.

FAX

Was, not Was.

Donger
06-17-2009, 04:20 PM
With great sadness, I declare you to be entirely hopeless, Mr. Donger.

I was my legs of you.

FAX

I presume you meant "wash" but you are correct, poetry has never been my thing.

FAX
06-17-2009, 05:07 PM
Yeah. Wash. Kinda loses something when you fail to spell correctly the most important friggin' word in your entire friggin' joke, doesn't it?

Damn.

FAX

Simply Red
06-17-2009, 05:18 PM
I presume you meant "wash" but you are correct, poetry has never been my thing.

do you like math, donger?

big nasty kcnut
06-17-2009, 05:38 PM
He a good singer. Lucky punk married to diana krall
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Donger
06-17-2009, 05:55 PM
do you like math, donger?

Yes.

AustinChief
06-18-2009, 09:13 PM
Good call...
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Demonpenz
06-19-2009, 04:04 PM
I need to plow through some costello. I had a friend that was really into him, but I can't even play his songs on guitar hero, they are annoying, but there are enough black and white ironic iconic scenester pics out there that there has to be something too him