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Kerberos
06-18-2009, 05:07 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4270311



Cleveland Browns receiver Donte' Stallworth was suspended by the NFL indefinitely without pay following his guilty plea to DUI manslaughter in the death of a pedestrian, the league announced Thursday.

Stallworth was sentenced in a Miami court Tuesday to 30 days in jail, a controversial ruling that drew a great deal of criticism.

Commissioner Roger Goodell wrote a detailed letter to Stallworth explaining the stiff penalty levied by the league.


"The conduct reflected in your guilty plea resulted in the tragic loss of life and was inexcusable," Goodell wrote. "While the criminal justice system has determined the legal consequences of this incident, it is my responsibility as NFL commissioner to determine the appropriate league discipline for your actions, which have caused irreparable harm to the victim and his family, your club, your fellow players and the NFL."

The suspension is effective immediately, but Goodell still plans to schedule a meeting with Stallworth, who signed a seven-year, $35 million contract with the Browns last year. But now it appears the team will have no choice but to cut ties with the seven-year veteran.

Browns spokesman Neal Gulkis said the team would comment later.

The last indefinite suspension handed down by Goodell was to Adam "Pacman" Jones of the Dallas Cowboys in October 2008. That punishment turned into a six-week ban.

In a memo sent to all 32 NFL teams, obtained by ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen from a team source, Goodell sought to reinforce the league's policy on "alcohol-related misconduct."

"DUI is a serious matter which poses great risks to both those who drive under the influence, and innocent third parties. This truth was tragically underscored in Mr. Stallworth's case," Goodell wrote in the memo.

"In the past few years, I have not hesitated to impose discipline, including suspensions, on club and league employees who have violated the law relating to alcohol use. Every club should advise its employees of their obligations and our commitment to hold people accountable for alcohol-related violations of law."

But Goodell showed no mercy in the wording of his letter to Stallworth.

"There is no reasonable dispute that your continued eligibility for participation at this time would undermine the integrity of and public confidence in our league," he said.

And in his memo to the teams, Goodell made his message quite clear: "Let's make sure that the 2009 season does not bring more tragedy or embarrassment to ourselves and our employees."

Mr. Flopnuts
06-18-2009, 05:08 PM
Repost. But just barely.

http://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=209148

Post 99

Kerberos
06-18-2009, 05:11 PM
Repost. But just barely.

http://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=209148

Post 99

That was an old post about him killing someone.

This was just posted on ESPN about Goodell lowing the AXE on his career.

I didn't see that anywhere else.

Mr. Krab
06-18-2009, 05:14 PM
I think the suspension is a good idea

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:19 PM
I think the suspension is a good idea

Damn right it's a good idea.

Just because the justice system in this country is fucked doesn't mean he should automatically re-gain the right to play in the league.

I'm betting at least 8 games by the time it's all said and done.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:20 PM
I think the real world should work this way, the justice system gives you your sentence then your job can fuck you over on top of it.

chiefs1111
06-18-2009, 05:21 PM
Damn right it's a good idea.

Just because the justice system in this country is fucked doesn't mean he should automatically re-gain the right to play in the league.

I'm betting at least 8 games by the time it's all said and done.

Mort was on Sportscenter and said Stallworth may get suspended for a year.

BigMeatballDave
06-18-2009, 05:21 PM
I hope he's done for the season.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:22 PM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

RedDread
06-18-2009, 05:22 PM
If I was convicted of DUI manslaughter I would expect to be fired from my job.

Mr. Flopnuts
06-18-2009, 05:22 PM
That was an old post about him killing someone.

This was just posted on ESPN about Goodell lowing the AXE on his career.

I didn't see that anywhere else.

There was no thread. I was just being retarded.

Well at least now he's officially been suspended from the NFL

Mr. Krab
06-18-2009, 05:23 PM
Mort was on Sportscenter and said Stallworth may get suspended for a year.I expect it to be "At Least" a year. I bet he gets another 4 games or more next year.

topher79
06-18-2009, 05:24 PM
He's not suspended indefinitely. Goodell just came out and said he will be suspended 30 hours.

Seems right to me.

Mr. Flopnuts
06-18-2009, 05:24 PM
He's not going to be suspended for a year. The Prosecutor has already declared the dead guy being mostly at fault. By mostly, it would've been all had Stallworth not had a 6 pack in him.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:25 PM
If I was convicted of DUI manslaughter I would expect to be fired from my job.

Yet jobs generally don't do something like that unless you are going to be in prison for a year or something.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:25 PM
If I was convicted of DUI manslaughter I would expect to be fired from my job.

Me too.

Micjones
06-18-2009, 05:25 PM
I think a suspension was in order, but I disagree with Goodell playing sheriff.

It's not his job to see to it that the league acts as a legal stop-gap to issue justice to NFL players.

I also think he's taken liberties with the legal process and used the circumstances within it inconsistently.

That said I would probably level a full-year suspension on Stallworth for his actions, myself.

BigMeatballDave
06-18-2009, 05:26 PM
He's not suspended indefinitely. Goodell just came out and said he will be suspended 30 hours.

Seems right to me.30 hrs?

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:26 PM
Yet jobs generally don't do something like that unless you are going to be in prison for a year or something.

Not true at all.

Hell, Missouri is a right-to-work state. You wouldn't even have to be convicted.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:28 PM
Not true at all.

Hell, Missouri is a right-to-work state. You wouldn't even have to be convicted.

I worked with a guy who had been caught with about 10 DUI's, I don't believe he ever killed anyone but he hit a few people and ended up on house arrest and the job never remotely considered terminating him.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:28 PM
I think a suspension was in order, but I disagree with Goodell playing sheriff.

It's not his job to see to it that the league acts as a legal stop-gap to issue justice to NFL players.

I also think he's taken liberties with the legal process and used the circumstances within it inconsistently.

That said I would probably level a full-year suspension on Stallworth for his actions, myself.

He's doing what past commissioners never had the balls to do:

Showing these guys that playing in the NFL is a privilege, not a right. Embarrass the league, and you're going to sit for a while, regardless of what the legal system has to say.

Way overdue, IMO.

Hydrae
06-18-2009, 05:28 PM
He's not going to be suspended for a year. The Prosecutor has already declared the dead guy being mostly at fault. By mostly, it would've been all had Stallworth not had a 6 pack in him.

I have not followed the case at all but I certainly thought the pedestrian had to have been largely at fault here. I believe the story is that someone was stopping for a yellow light when Stallworth went around him to beat the light. This is when he hit the pedestrian. It seems obvious to me that the pedestrian was jaywalking and shouldn't have been in the middle of the road in the first place. The only reason Stallworth got anything was the DUI aspect but I don't think it was much, if any, of a contribution to the accident itself.

Mr. Krab
06-18-2009, 05:29 PM
Yet jobs generally don't do something like that unless you are going to be in prison for a year or something.
How the hell do you know?

Every situation i have ever heard of, if the job finds out your got busted for anything serious, then you get fired. Unless it's some crap job anyway.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:29 PM
I worked with a guy who had been caught with about 10 DUI's, I don't believe he ever killed anyone but he hit a few people and ended up on house arrest and the job never remotely considered terminating him.

You're missing the point.

They would have had every right to.

KCUnited
06-18-2009, 05:29 PM
I would expect him to be suspended for the remained of his house arrest. That is when his true debt to society is paid.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:31 PM
I would expect him to be suspended for the remained of his house arrest. That is when his true debt to society is paid.

You're allowed to work while on house arrest right? The NFL is you know his job.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:32 PM
How the hell do you know?

Every situation i have ever heard of, if the job finds out your got busted for anything serious, then you get fired. Unless it's some crap job anyway.

ESTO.

KCUnited
06-18-2009, 05:32 PM
You're allowed to work while on house arrest right? The NFL is you know his job.
Vic is on house arrest and hasn't been instated. The legal process isn't over.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:32 PM
He's doing what past commissioners never had the balls to do:

Showing these guys that playing in the NFL is a privilege, not a right. Embarrass the league, and you're going to sit for a while, regardless of what the legal system has to say.

Way overdue, IMO.

That's not the reason...I'm sure you know what it is.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:33 PM
Vic is on house arrest and hasn't been instated. The legal process isn't over.

Now he went to prison for awhile I think his situation is a bit different.

Mr. Flopnuts
06-18-2009, 05:33 PM
That's not the reason...I'm sure you know what it is.

Carson Palmer would never get this kind of treatment!!!!

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 05:34 PM
That's not the reason...I'm sure you know what it is.

OK. Please enlighten us as to the real reason Goodell is taking a hard-line approach with players that disgrace the league.

KCUnited
06-18-2009, 05:34 PM
Now he went to prison for awhile I think his situation is a bit different.
A man is dead as compared to some dogs, that I think is a bit different.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:35 PM
Simple, the NFL knows where their bread is buttered. The NBA has an issue because the people who spend the most money on sports entertainment are middle aged white people.

They are trying to avoid this line being uttered by the people who will spend money on their sport "Oh no thugz takin ova our game!"

That is a big factor the NBA deals with that type of thing all the time and it's why marketing their game is difficult.

Mecca
06-18-2009, 05:36 PM
A man is dead as compared to some dogs, that I think is a bit different.

Why should we be more outraged than it appears even the mans own family was, they agreed to this.

KCUnited
06-18-2009, 05:40 PM
Why should we be more outraged than it appears even the mans own family was, they agreed to this.
Goddell stated he would not make a decision on Vick's reinstatement until the legal process is over. House arrest is part of the legal process.

Frazod
06-18-2009, 05:46 PM
Now that I know the specifics of the case better, I think this is unduly harsh. It's not like the guy he hit was sitting on a park bench minding his own business. The dude crossed the street both foolishly and illegally, and it is quite possible that Stallworth's drunken dumbassery wouldn't have mattered.

Is a suspension warranted? Sure. But they should just give him either eight games or an entire season and call it a day.

Micjones
06-18-2009, 06:02 PM
He's doing what past commissioners never had the balls to do:

Showing these guys that playing in the NFL is a privilege, not a right. Embarrass the league, and you're going to sit for a while, regardless of what the legal system has to say.

Way overdue, IMO.

That's mostly bullshit in my book.
Trying to force this code of ethics onto a culture that is largely anything but is an exercise in futility. Professional Sports culture doesn't exactly define all that's right with the world.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 06:06 PM
That's mostly bullshit in my book.
Trying to force this code of ethics onto a culture that is largely anything but is an exercise in futility. Professional Sports culture doesn't exactly define all that's right with the world.

He's not forcing anything.

He's merely punishing those that make bad choices and embarrass the league.

He didn't force Stallworth to drive with a BAC almost twice the limit and kill someone.

He didn't force Vick to torture dogs and run an interstate gambling ring.

He didn't force Matt Jones to snort blow.

He didn't force Jared Allen to be involved in 4 different alcohol/driving related instances.

He is, however, forcing guys to wake the fuck up and realize that they represent the league, and that being known more for a rap sheet than their play on the field is not acceptable.

Why is is still shocking to me that people actually defend these players?

Mecca
06-18-2009, 06:11 PM
The guy Stallworth hit as at serious fault his own self, that plea agreement should tell you as much.

OnTheWarpath58
06-18-2009, 06:17 PM
The guy Stallworth hit as at serious fault his own self, that plea agreement should tell you as much.

So, the plea was due to fault, or the fact that an immigrant family of a day laborer saw 7 figures and jumped?

Mecca
06-18-2009, 06:20 PM
You know what I'd like to know...why do people walk out in front of cars? It happens all the time, do people like to tempt fate?

kcfanXIII
06-18-2009, 06:37 PM
You know what I'd like to know...why do people walk out in front of cars? It happens all the time, do people like to tempt fate?

because their cell phones block their peripheral vision. i deal with the same thing on my bike.

Hydrae
06-18-2009, 06:45 PM
because their cell phones block their peripheral vision. i deal with the same thing on my bike.

You shouldn't be talking on your cell phone while on your bike then. :p

BigMeatballDave
06-18-2009, 06:53 PM
That's mostly bullshit in my book.
Trying to force this code of ethics onto a culture that is largely anything but is an exercise in futility. Professional Sports culture doesn't exactly define all that's right with the world.Playing in the NFL is like moving into a Gated Community, or an HOA neighborhood. You gotta play by the rules. Its not like these players HAVE to play in this league. They make a lot of money doing exactly what they love to do. Not breaking the law is NOT too much to ask.

kstater
06-18-2009, 06:56 PM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

So...You're advocating being able to buy yourself out of responsibility?

BWillie
06-18-2009, 07:32 PM
People that compare the Leonard Little situation and this situation are idiots. Leonard Little ran a RED LIGHT killing someone. Little also had almost a double BAC than Stallworth did. Secondly, if Stallworth hadn't of had anything to drink he probably would of been found 0% negligent and maybe even could have pursued the dead pedestrian's liability coverage for his car's damages. Based on the time served, it doesn't even appear this is a felony charge even though I could be wrong about that one.

Skip Towne
06-18-2009, 07:40 PM
I live in fear of a little kid running out from behind a parked car so I won't drink at all then drive.

milkman
06-18-2009, 07:46 PM
People that compare the Leonard Little situation and this situation are idiots. Leonard Little ran a RED LIGHT killing someone. Little also had almost a double BAC than Stallworth did. Secondly, if Stallworth hadn't of had anything to drink he probably would of been found 0% negligent and maybe even could have pursued the dead pedestrian's liability coverage for his car's damages. Based on the time served, it doesn't even appear this is a felony charge even though I could be wrong about that one.

None of that makes one little fucking difference.

He was above the legal limit.

He got behind the fucking wheel and drove.

Adept Havelock
06-18-2009, 07:48 PM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

Probably a similar reason as to why I find it pathetic some people outside the situation feels that punishment should be based on the wishes of the victim, instead of Criminal Law.

Stallworth and Little should rot in a cell till the day they die. Quid pro quo. :shrug:

People that compare the Leonard Little situation and this situation are idiots.

People who can't see they both took a life by being drunk and irresponsible jackasses are idiots. :shrug:

None of that makes one little ****ing difference.

He was above the legal limit.

He got behind the ****ing wheel and drove.

Nice to see someone gets it. :clap:

BWillie
06-18-2009, 07:48 PM
None of that makes one little ****ing difference.

He was above the legal limit.

He got behind the ****ing wheel and drove.

I'm not saying he shouldn't get suspended. He should. But it's not right to compare it with Leonard Little's situation, at least not in the same light. I think a year is a good suspensions IMO.

FAX
06-18-2009, 07:53 PM
Goodell really had no choice but to take some form of action. To do nothing would be perceived as either tacit approval or, at a minimum, acceptance.

Making the suspension indefinite gives him the chance to wait until things cool down and he can assess the situation and levy an appropriate, final punishment without creating more headlines. After all, 40 wet towel snaps to Stallworth's ass will be viewed by the media as cruel and unusual.

FAX

milkman
06-18-2009, 07:55 PM
I'm not saying he shouldn't get suspended. He should. But it's not right to compare it with Leonard Little's situation, at least not in the same light. I think a year is a good suspensions IMO.

The situations can be compared.

They broke the fucking law.

boogblaster
06-18-2009, 07:59 PM
It was a tragic for both parties ... hopefully Stallworth will learn by this and become a better manager of his off time .. by hiring a driver ...

BWillie
06-18-2009, 08:07 PM
The situations can be compared.

They broke the ****ing law.

As I've said before, this is a similar situation if someone had ran a stop sign and Stallworth had T-boned them. Would you feel any different if that was the case?

Micjones
06-18-2009, 08:08 PM
He's not forcing anything.

Goodell's spiel about doing irreparable harm to the grieving family, his team, and to the NFL smacks of him pining for ancillary justice that he felt the court of law failed to provide.

He's merely punishing those that make bad choices and embarrass the league.

It's obviously working. The swift and decisive (an often times inconsistently enforced) action is clearly proving to be a deterrent.

I question Goodell's motives in snuffing out the perceived threats to the NFL's image. I think he's gone a bit overboard in a quest to make a mark Paul Tagliabue may've fallen short of.

Why is is still shocking to me that people actually defend these players?

Perhaps it's because you're a selective reader that conveniently skipped over the part where I said I would've suspended him, myself, for an entire season?
:shrug:

milkman
06-18-2009, 08:12 PM
As I've said before, this is a similar situation if someone had ran a stop sign and Stallworth had T-boned them. Would you feel any different if that was the case?

Perhaps my post from the other Stallworth tread will help you understand exactly how I feel about both situations.

I have read through this thread, but have tried to stay away from commenting, because I'm biased on this subject.

But I have to say something here.

Yes, it's great that the family is being taken care of financilly, and a stronger prison sentence certainly won't bring back the lost family memeber.

However, having lost a father to a drunk driver before I even got a chance to know him, and having lost a brother to another drunk driver 30 years later, if I had my say in it, with the education and knowledge out there on the the effects of alcohol and the manner in which it impairs a person's ability to drive, there is absolutely no way in hell that a person who kills another person while driving impaired shouldn't be in prison for at least a minimum of 5 years, and when convicted, the court should award the family any assets that person has.

This, quite frankly, is bullshit.

I don't give a rat's ass how the situations were different.
In both, they drank.
They drove.

Hang the fuckers by their balls.

Micjones
06-18-2009, 08:14 PM
Playing in the NFL is like moving into a Gated Community, or an HOA neighborhood. You gotta play by the rules. Its not like these players HAVE to play in this league. They make a lot of money doing exactly what they love to do. Not breaking the law is NOT too much to ask.

Yeah...

Those lowly professional athletes should thank their lucky stars that they've been given the privilege of earning billions of dollars for their respective owners and the league in general.
ROFL

Micjones
06-18-2009, 08:18 PM
Goodell really had no choice but to take some form of action. To do nothing would be perceived as either tacit approval or, at a minimum, acceptance.

Making the suspension indefinite gives him the chance to wait until things cool down and he can assess the situation and levy an appropriate, final punishment without creating more headlines. After all, 40 wet towel snaps to Stallworth's ass will be viewed by the media as cruel and unusual.

FAX

That's part of my problem with Goodell's approach.
It's rather sloppy handling.

He's said time and again that the barometer for leveling suspensions, on players, is the way in which the cases themselves play out. Problem is, he's also taken action before the legal matters do just that.

I think he could appropriately assess the Stallworth situation and issue a suspension accordingly that was fair and equitable. Even now.

Brock
06-18-2009, 09:00 PM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

Maybe because in this society we don't let families of victims decide punishment. Just, you know, a little heads up for you.

whoman69
06-18-2009, 11:30 PM
I think the real world should work this way, the justice system gives you your sentence then your job can **** you over on top of it.

Isn't it amazing the NFL gave him a larger penalty than the justice system? Isn't that farging backwards?

Valiant
06-19-2009, 01:28 AM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

Seems to me the family was not concerned about punishment but a undisclosed amount of money..

Valiant
06-19-2009, 01:33 AM
Isn't it amazing the NFL gave him a larger penalty than the justice system? Isn't that farging backwards?

That is because the justice system didn't do shit.. The family would rather have the money instead.. Hell if this was not a NFL player, there would be no bargaining.. He would be in prison..

lostcause
06-19-2009, 02:44 AM
The justice system handed him a penalty that allows him to continue in his job. Let Stallworth make a living and fuck Goodell and his thoughts on morality.

KCChiefsMan
06-19-2009, 02:54 AM
the problem I have with this is, even though if it were mostly the pedestrians fault. If a everyday regular normal guy is put into the same situation he would be headed to prison for 5 years at least. Even if the guy leaped out on purpose trying to get hit by a car, if the driver had any beer or weed in him...PRISON. But not a celebrity with money, that's the problem I have with this. I don't think people should be driving drunk, don't get me wrong. But just saying.

Kerberos
06-19-2009, 02:56 AM
Why do I find it funny that people outside of the situation feel he deserves more punishment than THE FAMILY OF THE DEAD GUY, seems a bit odd to me.

I think a suspension was in order, but I disagree with Goodell playing sheriff.

It's not his job to see to it that the league acts as a legal stop-gap to issue justice to NFL players.

I also think he's taken liberties with the legal process and used the circumstances within it inconsistently.

That said I would probably level a full-year suspension on Stallworth for his actions, myself.



I guess in this case for Goodell "It's good to be da KING"?

Kerberos
06-19-2009, 03:12 AM
None of that makes one little ****ing difference.

He was above the legal limit.

He got behind the ****ing wheel and drove.

This

Demonpenz
06-19-2009, 07:59 AM
Yet jobs generally don't do something like that unless you are going to be in prison for a year or something.

Insurance, medical, pharmacy jobs you have to have a perfect record. One DUI you won't get a LIC for that state.

Brock
06-19-2009, 08:07 AM
The justice system handed him a penalty that allows him to continue in his job. Let Stallworth make a living and **** Goodell and his thoughts on morality.

The justice system doesn't decide if and where he can work. fuck lostcause and his thoughts on morality.

BigRedChief
06-19-2009, 08:20 AM
If I was convicted of DUI manslaughter I would expect to be fired from my job.
And be in jail for years.

BigMeatballDave
06-19-2009, 01:05 PM
Yeah...

Those lowly professional athletes should thank their lucky stars that they've been given the privilege of earning billions of dollars for their respective owners and the league in general.
ROFLThanks for missing my point, well done! :rolleyes:

Rain Man
06-19-2009, 01:31 PM
Yeah...

Those lowly professional athletes should thank their lucky stars that they've been given the privilege of earning billions of dollars for their respective owners and the league in general.
ROFL


We need a new generation of Sinclair Lewis to write a book about this and free them from their serfdom.

Rain Man
06-19-2009, 01:32 PM
the problem I have with this is, even though if it were mostly the pedestrians fault. If a everyday regular normal guy is put into the same situation he would be headed to prison for 5 years at least. Even if the guy leaped out on purpose trying to get hit by a car, if the driver had any beer or weed in him...PRISON. But not a celebrity with money, that's the problem I have with this. I don't think people should be driving drunk, don't get me wrong. But just saying.


The justice system took into account that the victim ran a 6.5 40 and could only bench 225 lbs one time.

Dottefan
06-19-2009, 03:53 PM
I hope we never see this guy in a NFL jersey again.