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Frankie
07-06-2009, 12:31 PM
The addition to my house that I have been working on for the past 2 yearsis nearly finished. FINALLY!! Now we are repainting the house. I'm planning to paint right over the old paint. But there are new parts that need to be primed. I have a few partially full cans of old exterior paint that will not be used as the final color. Can I use them up as primer?

Baconeater
07-06-2009, 12:34 PM
No, you don't want to use that if it's bare wood. I'd recommend using a semi-acrylic primer such as Kilz2. You'll want to thin it down with some water to make it easier to work with. You can also get it tinted so it's close to your finish color.

excessive
07-06-2009, 12:39 PM
I wouldn't. They sell self-priming paint nowdays, Valspar's Duramax to name one, that you could use
everywhere, but it's not a good idea to skip that step and go straight to paint.

mlyonsd
07-06-2009, 12:42 PM
No, primer is special in that it acts as a sealer and a special base for paint to adhere to.

Sorry tight wad, go stimulate the economy and spend some more money.

Phobia
07-06-2009, 12:49 PM
On drywall, sure. On bare wood? No.

Frankie
07-06-2009, 12:49 PM
No, primer is special in that it acts as a sealer and a special base for paint to adhere to.

Sorry tight wad, go stimulate the economy and spend some more money.

I wanna stimulate nature by using up those cans instead of tossing them. OK I admit, I wanted to save a few bucks too. Kinda killing two birds,...

Frankie
07-06-2009, 12:51 PM
On drywall, sure. On bare wood? No.

I have some drywall to finish up too, but these are exterior paint. Is this what you mean?

Phobia
07-06-2009, 12:52 PM
No, don't use exterior paint indoors.

ferrarispider95
07-06-2009, 12:55 PM
phobia can correct me if I am wrong.

But on new drywall make sure you get the PVA primer that seals so that you do not see your joints.

Frankie
07-06-2009, 01:07 PM
No, don't use exterior paint indoors.

That's what I thought.

Phobia
07-06-2009, 02:06 PM
phobia can correct me if I am wrong.

But on new drywall make sure you get the PVA primer that seals so that you do not see your joints.

Yeah - PVA primer is so cheap you're not really saving much if you recycle old house paint.

Halfcan
07-06-2009, 02:57 PM
No, you don't want to use that if it's bare wood. I'd recommend using a semi-acrylic primer such as Kilz2. You'll want to thin it down with some water to make it easier to work with. You can also get it tinted so it's close to your finish color.

you don't want to thin your paint down ever-Or use kilz

use an oil primer-and don't go with just some cheap stuff either-unless you want to repaint it Right in a few years

Baconeater
07-06-2009, 05:05 PM
you don't want to thin your paint down ever-Or use kilz

use an oil primer-and don't go with just some cheap stuff either-unless you want to repaint it Right in a few years
Dude, I've been painting for twenty fucking years, don't tell me what I can and can't do.

Halfcan
07-06-2009, 05:39 PM
Dude, I've been painting for twenty ****ing years, don't tell me what I can and can't do.

and you water peoples paint down?
I know some like liz-but I have never really liked it.

Halfcan
07-06-2009, 05:41 PM
and you water peoples paint down?


I know some like kilz-but I have never really liked it. :)

Baconeater
07-06-2009, 05:49 PM
and you water peoples paint down?
I know some like liz-but I have never really liked it.
Yes, especially primers over bare wood in the middle of the summer. And most interior paints I thin 10-30%. I don't do it to save money, the difference in the amount of paint used is negligible, it simply makes them easier to work with and I can still get a good finish. I rarely screw with exterior paint though.

And don't confuse Kilz2 with regular Kilz, there's a big difference.

Halfcan
07-06-2009, 06:06 PM
Yes, especially primers over bare wood in the middle of the summer. And most interior paints I thin 10-30%. I don't do it to save money, the difference in the amount of paint used is negligible, it simply makes them easier to work with and I can still get a good finish. I rarely screw with exterior paint though.

And don't confuse Kilz2 with regular Kilz, there's a big difference.

Well You are a 20 year vet at it-and could probably thin the paint in your sleep-Frankie is obviously a novice (hence the advice thread) so thinning is probably not the best advice. I had a painting co for 15 years-I rarely thinned stuff down -unless it was inside trim work. But to each his own.

stevieray
07-06-2009, 06:07 PM
meh, when we did fifty murals for on the border 20'x16' on MDF board, we would take all the old paint and mix it toghether and prime those boards...

all colors make grey primer...:)

Baconeater
07-06-2009, 06:16 PM
Well You are a 20 year vet at it-and could probably thin the paint in your sleep-Frankie is obviously a novice (hence the advice thread) so thinning is probably not the best advice. I had a painting co for 15 years-I rarely thinned stuff down -unless it was inside trim work. But to each his own.
Not the best advice? Whatever. If you enjoy making something twice as much work than it needs to be then that's your business, I'm just trying to help the guy out.

Hog Farmer
07-06-2009, 06:24 PM
The old paint can be used for primer, but you'll need to make sure it's not broken down. The only way to check is to taste the paint. If its broken down it won't leave a stain on your tongue. If it does leave a stain it should be OK to use. I hope this helps.

bevischief
07-06-2009, 06:36 PM
If it is left over and not going to use leave the lid open and let it dry and then toss it in the garbage when it drys out.

Halfcan
07-06-2009, 07:01 PM
Not the best advice? Whatever. If you enjoy making something twice as much work than it needs to be then that's your business, I'm just trying to help the guy out.

Okay you told him to use shitty kilz which is just about as watery as you can get-then use water to thin it down even more-and then put it over bare wood. First freeze that paint is popping like popcorn.

A GOOD oil primer is ALL I would Ever use outside on bare wood.

But whatever-I am not insulting you are your expierence. To me latex exterior primer is just about worthless.

Groves
07-06-2009, 10:44 PM
Watching bugeater and halfcan meet in this thread reminds me of the times you're playing the card game "war" and you're just cruising right along trading mid level cards when all of the sudden you both pull KINGS.

Baconeater
07-06-2009, 10:50 PM
Watching bugeater and halfcan meet in this thread reminds me of the times you're playing the card game "war" and you're just cruising right along trading mid level cards when all of the sudden you both pull KINGS.
Meh, Halfcan is a painter turned realtor turned soup kitchen operator, he doesn't know what the fuck he's talking about. I do this shit every damn day of my life.

cookster50
07-07-2009, 09:00 AM
The old paint can be used for primer, but you'll need to make sure it's not broken down. The only way to check is to taste the paint. If its broken down it won't leave a stain on your tongue. If it does leave a stain it should be OK to use. I hope this helps.

This.

Dartgod
07-07-2009, 09:07 AM
I hope this thread turns out as good as the JASONSAUTO/MrPappagoirgio Grease Monkey Smackdown. That thread was EPIC!!!!!!1111111ONEONEELEVEN

Frankie
07-07-2009, 04:52 PM
Well You are a 20 year vet at it-and could probably thin the paint in your sleep-Frankie is obviously a novice

Not really I have painted my house befor, inside and out. But I used primer and the paint straight out of the can. This was a question on the possibility of using up the cans of paint in my tool room as primer.

Frankie
07-07-2009, 04:54 PM
The only way to check is to taste the paint. If its broken down it won't leave a stain on your tongue. If it does leave a stain it should be OK to use.

:eek:

Halfcan
07-07-2009, 05:13 PM
Meh, Halfcan is a painter turned realtor turned soup kitchen operator, he doesn't know what the **** he's talking about. I do this shit every damn day of my life.

touchy touchy little buggy, sorry to question your GOD like authority on painting. If you want to use a watered down latex primer on your home-go ahead. Frankie might as well primer with a fuggin magic marker-it would last longer.

BTW-I started my business with a paint brush and roller-and when I left (because of my kids) I had upwards of 10 employees and more business than I could handle. I NEVER had to come back to a house I painted and fix shit. I have went through thousands of gallons of paint-so I DO know a bit about painting.

But I guess Your opinion is better than Anybodies else-and if someone disagrees with you-they don't know Shit. :rolleyes:

Frankie
07-20-2009, 11:59 AM
OK a minor health setback prevented me from tackling this painting job until this past weekened. I had all my paint and purchased an air gun from Wal-Mart. It started out OK but turned into a semi disaster in short order. The paint guy had me pick up my air spray gun from their automotive dept. It started clogging up after initially working well. I think the viscocity for automotive paint is a lot less than for house paint (even after the recommended thinning the house paint). I returned the gun and now am looking for a suitable spray gun for my air compressor. Any ideas about were to go for a good deal and how much I should expect to pay? Any help is really appreciated. This is a good weather week and I don't wanna miss out on it.

MOhillbilly
07-20-2009, 12:06 PM
Yes, especially primers over bare wood in the middle of the summer. And most interior paints I thin 10-30%. I don't do it to save money, the difference in the amount of paint used is negligible, it simply makes them easier to work with and I can still get a good finish. I rarely screw with exterior paint though.

And don't confuse Kilz2 with regular Kilz, there's a big difference.

rolls and cuts better?

Phobia
07-20-2009, 12:30 PM
OK a minor health setback prevented me from tackling this painting job until this past weekened. I had all my paint and purchased an air gun from Wal-Mart. It started out OK but turned into a semi disaster in short order. The paint guy had me pick up my air spray gun from their automotive dept. It started clogging up after initially working well. I think the viscocity for automotive paint is a lot less than for house paint (even after the recommended thinning the house paint). I returned the gun and now am looking for a suitable spray gun for my air compressor. Any ideas about were to go for a good deal and how much I should expect to pay? Any help is really appreciated. This is a good weather week and I don't wanna miss out on it.

No, please continue to seek advice from Walmart employees.

Frankie
07-20-2009, 12:32 PM
No, please continue to seek advice from Walmart employees.

OK I deserved that. Now can you answer my question?

Skip Towne
07-20-2009, 12:34 PM
Did you strain the pait before using it in the air gun? Not doing that will clog up a gun.

Frankie
07-20-2009, 12:41 PM
Did you strain the pait before using it in the air gun? Not doing that will clog up a gun.

No. I though that's for if you have old paint with debris in it. I'll strain next time no matter what.

Phobia
07-20-2009, 12:50 PM
OK I deserved that. Now can you answer my question?

Go buy this: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100634354

Or rent an airless sprayer for $50-85 a day.

When you're spraying latex on a house, airless works best. Lots of people buy Wagner spray products and lots of people have success with Wagner products. An airless solution isn't cheap but it's well worth the effort.