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Nzoner
07-14-2009, 12:38 PM
I remember those blistering hot August days in full pads and helmets,sweating and gasping for air during wind sprints and yet no one on our teams ever died from heat stroke.

Now don't get me wrong I'm not making light of the Stringer death I just think this judge's ruling could open up a major can of worms for any and all football coaches,etc.

"Any manufacturer who sells football helmets and shoulder pads without a heat stroke warning, knowing they're being used in extreme heat, does so at its peril," DeMarco said. "The same goes for leagues, coaches, and equipment managers who permit such equipment to be used without heat stroke warnings." (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4324917&campaign=rss&source=NFLHeadlines)



Judge orders jury trial in Stringer suit


The family of former Minnesota Vikings offensive lineman Korey Stringer won an important legal victory Monday against the manufacturer of the helmets and shoulder pads he wore when he died nearly eight years ago from complications of heatstroke.

A federal judge in Ohio concluded that manufacturer Riddell Inc. had a duty to warn Stringer that its helmets and shoulder pads could contribute to heat stroke when used in hot conditions.


As a result, U.S. District Court judge John D. Holschuh ordered a Nov. 2 jury trial to determine whether Riddell's failure to warn Stringer comprises legal culpability for his death.


Regardless of that eventual outcome, Stringer family spokesman James Gould termed Monday's ruling "landmark" because it makes the connection between the equipment and heat stroke. Gould said the best way to uphold Stringer's legacy is to "make sure what happened to Korey doesn't happen to any other football player -- from the National Football League all the way down to kids in Pop Warner."


"This decision should go a long way to ensure it doesn't," Gould added.


A Riddell spokesperson did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.


Stringer collapsed after a training camp practice on July 31, 2001 and died the next day in Mankato, Minn.

His wife, Kelci, settled legal claims in 2003 against the Minnesota doctor who treated him. She also settled a lawsuit earlier this year against the NFL, which agreed to support the creation of a heat illness prevention program for athletes of all ages.


Gould said the case against Riddell likely represents the final step of the family's legal pursuits.



"The timing of this is really compelling," Gould said. "Coaches all around the country, at every level, are getting their equipment ready now for camps. This really brings the issue to the forefront."


Holschuh wrote it was "reasonably foreseeable ... that a user of [Riddell's] helmets and shoulder pads during extremely hot and humid conditions might suffer from a heat stroke." Thus, Holschuh concluded, Riddell "owed Stringer a duty to warn."


That conclusion paves the way for the jury trial next fall. It does not legally require Riddell to label its equipment immediately. But Stringer's attorney, Paul DeMarco, said it should provide ample incentive to do so in order to avoid future legal liability.


"Any manufacturer who sells football helmets and shoulder pads without a heat stroke warning, knowing they're being used in extreme heat, does so at its peril," DeMarco said. "The same goes for leagues, coaches, and equipment managers who permit such equipment to be used without heat stroke warnings."

Kevin Seifert covers the NFC North for ESPN.com.

booyaf2
07-14-2009, 12:41 PM
Well, it is hot outside.

Dartgod
07-14-2009, 12:42 PM
Good Lord. :shake:

Didn't they find out that he was taking some sort of speed or performance enhancers? It's been a while so I'm not sure, but I seem to remember something about that.

wild1
07-14-2009, 12:45 PM
so they slap a sticker on the helmet. eh.

CoMoChief
07-14-2009, 12:48 PM
No offense to anyone that has died or has had complications with heat stroke but practicing outdoors in the heat, having 2-days, etc has been done for years and years, with and without pads.




This family is trying to get a huge check from someone. Didn't they already lose the civil case against the Vikings on this or something?

Dayze
07-14-2009, 12:52 PM
hooray....more government involvment. Get ready for lawsuits a plenty.

Mile High Mania
07-14-2009, 01:01 PM
It is borderline insane, but I will say this... in regards to sports or anything else in life, if there is technology that can be used (reasonably) to help protect people, why not use it? I realize that people have being doing this for decades, but that doesn't mean we have to avoid useful advances in technology.

sedated
07-14-2009, 01:07 PM
because the warnings on cigarettes were so effective

cdcox
07-14-2009, 01:16 PM
because the warnings on cigarettes were so effective

In 1965 52% of males and 34% of females in the US smoked. Warning labels were implemented in 1966. In 2007, 24% of males and 18% of females in the US smoked. I think the effort to inform the public about the dangers of smoking (while allowing individuals to make their own personal decisions), of which warning labels was only one arm of the campaign, is clearly one of the things government got right.

Phobia
07-14-2009, 01:19 PM
The winners in this case? Lawyers and sticker manufacturers.

wild1
07-14-2009, 01:21 PM
it is representative of the "take care of me" attitude most people have toward the world today.

Bowser
07-14-2009, 01:22 PM
Back when I was your age, they made me take salt pills when I played little league, just so I could retain more water in the hot months of summer, and wouldn't be so thirsty. And I LIKED it!

Molitoth
07-14-2009, 01:23 PM
Another get rich quick act.

BigRichard
07-14-2009, 01:23 PM
I think they should put warnings on winter coats too. How about sweaters? WTF??? Dumbest bunch of bullshit I have read in a while. I hate seeing shit like this.

Phobia
07-14-2009, 01:36 PM
Lawyers become judges and judges extend cases so lawyers can get paid. If you want to make a good living in this country, fake a head injury and become a lawyer.

orange
07-14-2009, 01:38 PM
Lawyers become judges and judges extend cases so lawyers can get paid. If you want to make a good living in this country, fake a head injury and become a lawyer.

Oh. So that's a bandage on your head in the avatar.

It all makes sense now.

Dartgod
07-14-2009, 02:00 PM
In 1965 52% of males and 34% of females in the US smoked. Warning labels were implemented in 1966. In 2007, 24% of males and 18% of females in the US smoked. I think the effort to inform the public about the dangers of smoking (while allowing individuals to make their own personal decisions), of which warning labels was only one arm of the campaign, is clearly one of the things government got right.
And yet STILL people sued the tobacco companies for wrongful death.

Yeah, a lot of good those stickers did.

BigRichard
07-14-2009, 02:10 PM
In 1965 52% of males and 34% of females in the US smoked. Warning labels were implemented in 1966. In 2007, 24% of males and 18% of females in the US smoked. I think the effort to inform the public about the dangers of smoking (while allowing individuals to make their own personal decisions), of which warning labels was only one arm of the campaign, is clearly one of the things government got right.

I would like to see what the stats were 5 years after implemeting those labels. I bet the numbers hadn't changed at all. I don't think the labels had anything to do with the percentage of smokers. It was many other factors that came years later.

MOhillbilly
07-14-2009, 02:19 PM
When my Grandpa played football he folded his helmet and put it in his back pocket after games.

cdcox
07-14-2009, 02:25 PM
I would like to see what the stats were 5 years after implemeting those labels. I bet the numbers hadn't changed at all. I don't think the labels had anything to do with the percentage of smokers. It was many other factors that came years later.

Actually the rates were decreasing during the period 1955 to 1965 prior to the warning labels. But they began to decrease much faster in the period of 1965 to 1970 (see link). There were lots of Americans that quit smoking during that time period, my dad being one of them. I was very aware of the issue due to education efforts in the public schools.

That said, smoking is a significant health issue. Football helmets are not.


http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762370.html

Shaid
07-14-2009, 02:26 PM
Idiotic. Of course it's hot outside. I guess we'd better have roadsigns up all over the place during the summer warning people that it's hot outside and swap them to "Put on a coat" signs in the winter. It's common sense. Warning labels are so common now that noone reads them anyways. If they only used them when they were actually needed maybe people would pay more attention.

DaneMcCloud
07-14-2009, 02:26 PM
I think you guys are looking at this issue in the wrong light.

Requiring Riddell (or any other helmet/shoulder pad manufacturer) to have warning stickers will absolve them of future liability. All Riddell would have to say in the future is "Read the warning label".

It seems to me that the lawyers for Kory Stringer are trying to establish a legacy, not create more lawsuits.

DaneMcCloud
07-14-2009, 02:27 PM
Idiotic. Of course it's hot outside. I guess we'd better have roadsigns up all over the place during the summer warning people that it's hot outside and swap them to "Put on a coat" signs in the winter. It's common sense. Warning labels are so common now that noone reads them anyways. If they only used them when they were actually needed maybe people would pay more attention.

When you were 11 years old playing organized football, did anyone ever warn you that you could die of heat stroke due to the combination of heat, shoulder pads and a helmet?

Yeah, me neither.

mikey23545
07-14-2009, 02:32 PM
In 1965 52% of males and 34% of females in the US smoked. Warning labels were implemented in 1966. In 2007, 24% of males and 18% of females in the US smoked. I think the effort to inform the public about the dangers of smoking (while allowing individuals to make their own personal decisions), of which warning labels was only one arm of the campaign, is clearly one of the things government got right.

You know, I have heard these statistics before, and I think they are absolute bullshit.

If only 24% of all males are smokers, every damn one of them must live within a 100 mile radius of me.

I just do not believe those numbers for one second (Yes, I am a non-smoker).

Stanley Nickels
07-14-2009, 02:34 PM
I certainly don't agree with government intervention in cases like this, but so many of you are looking at this from some "traditionalist" mindset.
The fact is, so many of you that played recreationally or in middle/high school, didn't have nearly as intense workouts as pro football teams. Your grampys weren't having heat strokes, but they also weren't running two-a-days between weightlifting, plyometrics, resistance and speed training, etc.
The bodies are pushed to be bigger, better, faster and stronger, and the response to extreme conditions is indicative in cases like this.

The heat stroke issue should be inherent to coaches in players who practice in that weather-- that's not where my argument is. But to simply argue that "well, we've been doing it this way for decades"... well, that just doesn't translate the same any more.

El Jefe
07-14-2009, 02:42 PM
Good Lord. :shake:

Didn't they find out that he was taking some sort of speed or performance enhancers? It's been a while so I'm not sure, but I seem to remember something about that.

No.

Jenson71
07-14-2009, 02:43 PM
You know, I have heard these statistics before, and I think they are absolute bullshit.

If only 24% of all males are smokers, every damn one of them must live within a 100 mile radius of me.

I just do not believe those numbers for one second (Yes, I am a non-smoker).

Do you live in a big city?

mikey23545
07-14-2009, 02:47 PM
Do you live in a big city?

No, not at all...about 60 miles from Orlando in Florida.

Shaid
07-14-2009, 02:49 PM
I certainly don't agree with government intervention in cases like this, but so many of you are looking at this from some "traditionalist" mindset.
The fact is, so many of you that played recreationally or in middle/high school, didn't have nearly as intense workouts as pro football teams. Your grampys weren't having heat strokes, but they also weren't running two-a-days between weightlifting, plyometrics, resistance and speed training, etc.
The bodies are pushed to be bigger, better, faster and stronger, and the response to extreme conditions is indicative in cases like this.

The heat stroke issue should be inherent to coaches in players who practice in that weather-- that's not where my argument is. But to simply argue that "well, we've been doing it this way for decades"... well, that just doesn't translate the same any more.

We also didn't have nearly the coach to player ratio that these pro teams have. They have medical staff around to ensure players are keeping themselves properly hydrated, etc. It's still a matter of common sense and if they were pushed too far, it's on the coaches, not the equipment manufacturer.

Dartgod
07-14-2009, 02:51 PM
No.
OK. Maybe it was discussed at the time. I do remember something about it.

Dartgod
07-14-2009, 02:54 PM
We also didn't have nearly the coach to player ratio that these pro teams have. They have medical staff around to ensure players are keeping themselves properly hydrated, etc. It's still a matter of common sense and if they were pushed too far, it's on the coaches, not the equipment manufacturer.
This.

Jenson71
07-14-2009, 03:07 PM
No, not at all...about 60 miles from Orlando in Florida.

Okay. When I was in NY, the total amount of people that smoked amazed me. It looked like 1/4 people really did smoke. Maybe 1/3. I don't see that at all where I'm from, in Iowa. Here, it seems like maybe one smoker out of 10 people.

Phobia
07-14-2009, 03:15 PM
Okay. When I was in NY, the total amount of people that smoked amazed me. It looked like 1/4 people really did smoke. Maybe 1/3. I don't see that at all where I'm from, in Iowa. Here, it seems like maybe one smoker out of 10 people.

Look out Rainman - looks like you have some competition.

acesn8s
07-14-2009, 03:30 PM
Can I get a sticker on the water fountain that says "Drinking may prevent heat stroke"?

Dayze
07-14-2009, 03:34 PM
When my Grandpa played football he folded his helmet and put it in his back pocket after games.

that sh*t is funny right there.
ROFL

Jenson71
07-14-2009, 03:42 PM
Look out Rainman - looks like you have some competition.

Not at all. My calculation skills rotate around cooking measurements. Anything beyond that and I'm reaching for Ibuprofen.

googlegoogle
07-14-2009, 11:32 PM
too many lawsuits in this country. it's just a form of theft and we all pay.

i got victimized by some scammer who barely bumped into me. They sued the insurer and said he got seizures from it.

it's a criminal business.

aturnis
07-14-2009, 11:53 PM
For fucks sake...it's a sticker. Someone call the whaaaambulance.

Guru
07-14-2009, 11:59 PM
this is as bad as the whole McDonalds coffee fiascoe. Warning: contents are extremely hot. Well duh.

veist
07-15-2009, 09:58 AM
Good Lord. :shake:

Didn't they find out that he was taking some sort of speed or performance enhancers? It's been a while so I'm not sure, but I seem to remember something about that.

He was using ephedra which yes, contributed to his death.

Skip Towne
07-15-2009, 10:16 AM
Back when I played football 100 years ago, the coches wouldn't give us water. They thought that made us "tough".

ChiefButthurt
07-15-2009, 10:57 AM
I haven't burned my mouth since McDonald's placed that warning on a cup of coffee.

The only thing this says is that the human race is stupid. All those fucking martians are laughing at us right about now.