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View Full Version : Home and Auto Black walnut nuisance.


Stanley Nickels
08-16-2009, 03:55 PM
So, I'm a new homeowner, and one of the things I absolutely dislike about my new place is that I have a large, obnoxious black walnut tree in my back yard. It drops walnuts everywhere (hull still on), which attract insects of all kinds and dull my lawnmower's blade. Further, they ooze a very strong black dye which is impossible to get off of hands, clothes, or whatever else it touches.

I've heard the black walnut trees are valuable, as their wood creates high-quality furniture and some people really enjoy their nuts. But I just can't stand it anymore.

So, my question is this: does anybody have a black walnut tree in their yard; and, if so, how do you manage it? Has anybody sold a black walnut tree, and what did you get for it?

Really, I'd just as soon have somebody cut and haul it on their own dime, keeping whatever lumber and nut profits they make... any chance of that?

chief husker
08-16-2009, 04:34 PM
I have nine black walnut trees in my yard. You can make the choice to have it cut down for the money. I look at it as chance to keep my arm in shape by throwing them into the creek. Better than a locust tree.

Buehler445
08-16-2009, 04:37 PM
I have nine black walnut trees in my yard. You can make the choice to have it cut down for the money. I look at it as chance to keep my arm in shape by throwing them into the creek. Better than a locust tree.

Truth. My grandad planted a kajillion of those thorny ass motherfuckers.

As to the OP, I'd rake them up daily to keep the bugs down and prior to mowing.

Rooster
08-16-2009, 04:40 PM
Most saw mills will not buy walnut trees that have grown up within city limits. There is too big a chance that a nail might have been driven into the tree at some point in it's life. I don't know where you live but that's just a FYI.

KCBOSS1
08-16-2009, 04:42 PM
I don't know what they bring now, but man that wood and the stump use to be worth some money. May still be, I would check into it.

JD10367
08-16-2009, 04:50 PM
Black walnuts? Are they more of a nuisance than white walnuts?

http://www.popamericana.com/!/thats%20racist%20mss.gif

:D

Manila-Chief
08-16-2009, 04:50 PM
I was at a missions conference up in MO last winter, and the guy we stayed with was picking up the nuts and selling them. You got kids? A way for them to make some money.

Bugeater
08-16-2009, 04:59 PM
I'd imagine you could find someone to cut it down and haul it away for free if it is an easy drop and not close to power lines or any other structures. Hell I'd do it if you lived near me. Try Craigslist.

Gonzo
08-16-2009, 05:02 PM
Walnut trees make the nicest furniture and gun stocks so... there you go.
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Phobia
08-16-2009, 05:03 PM
Where you located?

Over-Head
08-16-2009, 05:04 PM
Set up a charcoal BBQ underneith it, hose the tree down with lighter fluid as well, and light a match.
Presto!!!
A weekend long weenie roast that looks totally accidental :thumb:

Groves
08-16-2009, 05:08 PM
You can for sure sell the nuts. $150 a ton or something. straight off the tree. My neighbors do it, but they have a few more than one tree. Can't remember the price, either.

As for the wood. It's gorgeous. I'll buy the trunk if it's near Springfield.

joesomebody
08-16-2009, 06:03 PM
My dads farm is full of walnut trees, and his yard has 3 or 4 in it. He mows with a brush hog, so they don't really bother him I guess. I think he sold some red oak when he bought the place 20 years ago, but he has never sold walnut, though they are valuable. As someone said though, most mills and loggers want nothing to do with a yard tree due to nails. Might find a local artisan that would be interested though.

Stanley Nickels
08-16-2009, 06:23 PM
Where you located?

I'm in Mission, 53rd and Lamar area.


The tree is, in my estimation, about 35 feet tall, about 20 feet south of my house, with a huge free area just south of the trunk. I've looked up what the ripe (ready to bake) fallen nuts look like, and picked a few hundred of them from my lawn. I'll be giving them to my grandpa.

I'm pretty adamant, having read up on the value of the trees, that I'm not going to hire a service. I'll either have somebody come take the tree on their own time, or just deal with it and keep the nuts tidy. It doesn't seem like the guy before me kept the lawn in very good shape, I've found years-old rotten nuts (cue jokes) that have literally deteriorated into the ground.

Stanley Nickels
08-16-2009, 06:24 PM
If this were a white walnut tree, it'd be nice and tidy and clean up after itself
/sarcasm

Gonzo
08-16-2009, 06:30 PM
I'm in Mission, 53rd and Lamar area.


The tree is, in my estimation, about 35 feet tall, about 20 feet south of my house, with a huge free area just south of the trunk. I've looked up what the ripe (ready to bake) fallen nuts look like, and picked a few hundred of them from my lawn. I'll be giving them to my grandpa.

I'm pretty adamant, having read up on the value of the trees, that I'm not going to hire a service. I'll either have somebody come take the tree on their own time, or just deal with it and keep the nuts tidy. It doesn't seem like the guy before me kept the lawn in very good shape, I've found years-old rotten nuts (cue jokes) that have literally deteriorated into the ground.

Good job cleaning those nuts man. Nobody likes old nasty rotten ones.
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LaChapelle
08-16-2009, 06:46 PM
I don't care for the smell of walnut husks. But it's got to keep the tree rats coming to your yard.

DeezNutz
08-16-2009, 06:48 PM
I'm sorry that the tree nutted all over your house.

Stanley Nickels
08-16-2009, 06:52 PM
I don't care for the smell of walnut husks. But it's got to keep the tree rats coming to your yard.

I hate the smell, the pitch black oily secretion, the thousands of insects in my yard.
I hate the jokes about getting black nut all over me... :D

Valiant
08-16-2009, 07:12 PM
My grandma has 3 of those trees in her yard in gladstone... Only one still produces.. played baseball with them when I was younger.. And she has tons of squirrels in her yard from that tree, so no idea why it would keep them away..

boogblaster
08-16-2009, 08:29 PM
I like black walnut meats but some don't .. you should be able to sell them for profit ...

Phobia
08-16-2009, 08:46 PM
I'll check with a guy who does some work for me... he dabbles in tree removal. See if he wants to take it down in exchange for the wood.

JD10367
08-16-2009, 08:49 PM
I like black walnut meats but some don't

Is it true that once a squirrel has black walnuts, they won't go back? :D

Groves
08-16-2009, 08:51 PM
How much of the trunk is straight and limb free measured from the ground? If the tree is only 35ft tall total.......that's a pretty young walnut. It won't be getting harvested by anyone for the wood.....unless you mean firewood. It does a reasonable job of burning.

Go find a local woodturning club. They turn fresh wood like this and they don't need lots of clear trunk. Often times they prefer it kinda gnarly. Dude.

btlook1
08-16-2009, 10:03 PM
I'll check with a guy who does some work for me... he dabbles in tree removal. See if he wants to take it down in exchange for the wood.

That's probably your best bet if you live in town. I sold 19 walnut trees a few years ago and got $4900 or so out of them. I figure I got taken however I called 3 different loggers and he was the only one that showed up. Had one in the yard he offered 500 for but wifey wouldn't let him cut it as it helps block the front of the house....maybe someday it will be worth more...I hear it's 80 yrs old before they are worth logging...long time for a tree to grow just to cut it down becuase you don't like it.

Smoke
08-16-2009, 10:51 PM
7'2" from the stump to the first limb is the money log. Loggers will say 8' but that's just what they say. A clear 7'2" log worthy tree will bring $600 owner share easy.

Stanley Nickels
08-17-2009, 06:23 AM
7'2" from the stump to the first limb is the money log. Loggers will say 8' but that's just what they say. A clear 7'2" log worthy tree will bring $600 owner share easy.

Just went out back, first branch is at least 9 feet above ground (I think closer to 10)

tooge
08-17-2009, 07:02 AM
So, I'm a new homeowner, and one of the things I absolutely dislike about my new place is that I have a large, obnoxious black walnut tree in my back yard. It drops walnuts everywhere (hull still on), which attract insects of all kinds and dull my lawnmower's blade. Further, they ooze a very strong black dye which is impossible to get off of hands, clothes, or whatever else it touches.

I've heard the black walnut trees are valuable, as their wood creates high-quality furniture and some people really enjoy their nuts. But I just can't stand it anymore.

So, my question is this: does anybody have a black walnut tree in their yard; and, if so, how do you manage it? Has anybody sold a black walnut tree, and what did you get for it?

Really, I'd just as soon have somebody cut and haul it on their own dime, keeping whatever lumber and nut profits they make... any chance of that?

I have about 10 black walnut trees in the yard. I give the kids two dollars per 5 gallon bucket they fill with walnuts (my kids are real young). People will buy them or put them buy the road and people will take them to eat. No kidding.

Stanley Nickels
08-17-2009, 07:19 AM
I have about 10 black walnut trees in the yard. I give the kids two dollars per 5 gallon bucket they fill with walnuts (my kids are real young). People will buy them or put them buy the road and people will take them to eat. No kidding.

Do you try to grow any vegetables in the yard?
Our thing is, we want to grow some tomatoes and cucumbers, and the best place to put a garden is right around where the walnut tree currently stands. The oils from the walnut get into the soil and poison any vegetation there.
Where in Liberty do you give away walnuts? My grandpa lives out there (the one I'm saving the walnuts for), around the South Liberty Baptist area.

seclark
08-17-2009, 07:59 AM
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/YGLNews/YGLN-Sept0102.html#walnut

Homeowners often call the Forest Resources Extension office with questions regarding their black walnut trees. Sometimes it is to ask why nothing seems to grow under them, but more often it is to ask whether or not there is anyone out there who buys them. They have heard somewhere that these trees are worth quite a bit of money. Unfortunately, this is not usually true for walnuts grown in an urban setting. Black walnut (Juglans nigra) has often been used for furniture, art, gun stocks, and other wood products because of the color, grain and ease of working with the wood. While most logs are turned into lumber, the best logs are turned into veneer. Veneer is a very thin sheet of wood that can be used to cover another species of wood or plywood to give it the appearance of another, in this case, walnut. This allows walnut looking products to be produced at a much lower cost.

Whether the walnut will be used for lumber or veneer, there are several characteristics that determine whether or not the tree is valuable for sale, including trunk diameter, height, branching and whether or not the tree is free of defects. Another concern with urban walnuts is what could possibly be in the trunk itself. An old eye screw from a hammock may be in the tree unknown to both the current owners and therefore could cause harm to the person removing the tree.

Trunk diameter is measured at 4-1/2 feet off the ground. It can be found by measuring around the circumference of the tree and dividing the circumference by 3.14. Most buyers look for trees with a diameter of more than 18 inches. A few may purchase smaller diameter trees if they are a part of a group, but those with a diameter of less than 15 inches are of relatively little value.

Tree height is also taken into consideration. Merchantable height means the trunk height from the base to the point where major branches or trunk forking begin. A buyer will look for trees that would contain logs with a merchantable height of 8-10 feet (this is especially the case for logs that may be used for veneer). In most cases more than one log is necessary for consideration by a buyer.

Tree quality is another consideration. This is measured by how free the trunk is from defects such as crookedness, branches, holes, bumps, cracks, scars, insect or disease damage and wounds. The fewer the defects, the more valuable the tree. In general, the trees with a large diameter and a long trunk free from most defects are the ones that have the greatest potential for being a valuable lumber or veneer tree.

Most trees grown in an urban setting, however, do not usually exhibit these characteristics. An urban tree doesn't have to compete with surrounding trees for light and therefore will often have a shorter trunk with many branches low to the ground. This gives the tree little if any merchantable height. Urban trees are also more likely to have been injured or subject to disease than a tree grown in the forest.

The biggest reason why most buyers will not purchase urban walnuts is the potential risk that they may contain objects imbedded in the trunk that could pose a substantial risk for injury when removing and processing the tree. If the tree is large enough for the owner to consider selling it for lumber, it could very likely have foreign object from 25-50 years ago in its trunk that the owner would have no way of knowing existed.

The last factor is the difficulty and cost of coming to harvest one or two trees in an urban setting. It often makes little economic sense for a buyer to bring a crew and equipment in to harvest the tree. Also, most urban trees grow fairly close to houses, power lines and other structures that make it difficult, expensive and time consuming to harvest.

Although walnuts are not often considered the ideal shade tree for the yard because of the chemical juglone they secrete discourages other plants growing around them; this is often their highest value to the homeowner. A large tree can provide shade, beauty and real-estate value to a home that may not be recovered by trying to sell it for lumber.

tooge
08-17-2009, 08:00 AM
Do you try to grow any vegetables in the yard?
Our thing is, we want to grow some tomatoes and cucumbers, and the best place to put a garden is right around where the walnut tree currently stands. The oils from the walnut get into the soil and poison any vegetation there.
Where in Liberty do you give away walnuts? My grandpa lives out there (the one I'm saving the walnuts for), around the South Liberty Baptist area.

My garden is not near the walnuts. I live on A highway and I just put the box with a "free" sign on the side of the road and they are gone within an hour or so every time.