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ChiefaRoo
08-18-2009, 10:46 PM
I'm coaching for the first time. It's a rewarding experience. Have any of you guys ever done this before? Any advice?

"Bob" Dobbs
08-18-2009, 10:48 PM
I've never done it, but it's safe to say 1)avoid RRPP and 2)avoid the Cover 2. Any 7 year olds named Sanchez in the neighborhood?

Chiefnj2
08-18-2009, 10:48 PM
Remember that your primary goal is to make sure each and every kid wants to come out and play football when they are 9.

"Bob" Dobbs
08-18-2009, 10:49 PM
Seriously, that IS pretty cool. Sounds like a lot of fun! Good luck.

ChiefaRoo
08-18-2009, 10:49 PM
I've never done it, but it's safe to say 1)avoid RRPP and 2)avoid the Cover 2. Any 7 year olds named Sanchez in the neighborhood?

We've got one Sanchez. :) One of the dad's has two boys walking around with Mizzou jerseys on. I'm just sayin'

ChiefaRoo
08-18-2009, 10:51 PM
Remember that your primary goal is to make sure each and every kid wants to come out and play football when they are 9.

Yes, of course. That being said it's a lot of work to get the light to go on for some of them.

MahiMike
08-18-2009, 10:54 PM
Yep, you'll love it. Enjoy.

Chiefnj2
08-18-2009, 10:54 PM
Yes, of course. That being said it's a lot of work to get the light to go on for some of them.

They will figure things out at their own pace.

ChiefaRoo
08-18-2009, 10:58 PM
They will figure things out at their own pace.

So your saying don't do the Oklahoma drill over and over again until one of them passes out?

.....let me mark that down.

Phobia
08-18-2009, 11:01 PM
You're now qualified for the recently opened slot for Chiefs media credentials. Contact Bob Moore immediately.

dj56dt58
08-18-2009, 11:14 PM
you play to win the game

YOU PLAY TO WIN THE GAME!

ChiefaRoo
08-18-2009, 11:19 PM
you play to win the game

YOU PLAY TO WIN THE GAME!

I will say this. Coaching is a lot harder than knowing. I didn't realize that until I started.

salame
08-18-2009, 11:24 PM
I have found that a firm squeeze to the forearm and lots of cussing is a fine motivator

DeezNutz
08-18-2009, 11:24 PM
If you're not yelling at 'em, you're not coaching them.

Oh, and every single 15-year-old referee is actually trying to **** your team, especially your own son.

Adhere to these basic principles, and you, too, can be "that guy." "That guy" constitutes about 75% of all adults involved in youth sports, unfortunately.

Rain Man
08-18-2009, 11:52 PM
It seems like it'd be pretty cool. I tried to volunteer to do it once many years ago, but the league was very disorganized and by the time they called me I had given up and it was the night before the first practice.

I'm more interested, though, in semi-pro football. Those teams can always use coaches from what I've seen, and adults would be more fun for me. And by "coaching", I guess I really mean "coordinating". I've got no skill to teach someone footwork and tackling and stuff, but it'd be fun to make plays and train them to execute.

When I was doing stats for a local semi-pro team, it occurred to me that a team that had special teams coaching and plays could probably go undefeated, because kickoffs and punts were more or less chaos. A team that actually had a blocking system could probably dominate the field position battle every week.

salame
08-19-2009, 12:02 AM
http://www.grizzoulian.com/hauckyelling.jpg

Barret
08-19-2009, 04:20 AM
My advice:

Get them loving to hit and tackle one another. I remember a game where you have 1 person a little ahead of two cones and the other with a ball. The objective is to get past the cones for the ball carrier and the "defense" needs a stop. Just one on one and very little room to juke or anything odd. Go offense vs defense and have their "team" cheering them on for the stop or the TD.

Build up confidence in the kids is another big one. You want the 8 year olds coming back next year. Always try to find something positive in what ever is going on. Even if they fumble you can say "hey you made it 10 yards...good job..now we need to keep the ball and you can go even further"

DON'T listen to any parent. Be polite and state that you will take their advice and see how it works then let it go in one ear and out the other. Also try not to have any parent try to coach from the stands or during practice the sideline. Kids that age just want to have fun, an overbearing parent trying to force rules or their thoughts onto the child makes the game no longer fun and they quit or don't try as hard.

I never coached football but I did coach peewee bowling for 7-15 year olds. The younger kids just want the ball to go down and hit some pins. The older kids start wanting to know how to be a better bowler. Why I brought up the parents and keeping them in control....I get the feeling kids know who the coach is and who the parent is. If the parent really knew what the right thing to do is why arent they coaching? So they have built in respect for you. Dont lose it.

I recommend just setting some goals for them that are easy and then slowly inching up the "bar" till the end of the year. Keep it all in a notepad and show it to them at the end of the year to show what they have accomplished. O-line can be X number of false starts to 0 false starts at the end of the year. That type of thing.

Another thing that gets the smaller kids going. Watch real football and then come practice time or game time bring up something and compare it to what one of the kids just did. "I saw the Chiefs game this weekend and saw LJ bum rush over two people just like you did...good job" Just builds confidence and gets them into wanting to do more for you.

Anyway I hope this helps

CoMoChief
08-19-2009, 04:29 AM
Make sure you blow up at the referees and cuss and threaten them as well in front of the kids.

They need to know when a bad call is made.

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 06:30 AM
I'm now entering my 8th season coaching tackle. I've been an assistant the whole time, because I'm not much of a x's and o's guy, I work with kids on positions and techniques. What I've learned over the last 7 years is:

1) You start out strict and hard with these boys. I've coached from 8 year olds all the way to 12 year olds and back again. Regardless of age, these boys want, NEED to be whipped into shape. That doesn't mean screaming and swearing, it means consistency and getting them to understand your expectations from the get go. If you start soft, you will lose. It's happened to us a couple of times. Somehow, we started a season soft, and they reacted and became a soft team.

2) Get a grip on the parents from day one. Make sure they know that YOU are the coach and that if they have any issues or problems that you are happy to speak with them about it AFTER the game or AFTER practice. Let them know that they need to encourage their kid at games, not coach him (or her as the case may be).

3) We started this year a little earlier, which is great. We are having our 3rd practice tomorrow, and all we are doing is running their little couch potato asses off and teaching footwork drills. Get them into the mindset of hard work early, they will be hungry to hit and play ball by the time they get pads on. Running sucks. Just ask the Chiefs...heheheh...

4) At the beginning of every season, I explain to the boys that winning is NOT everything...but losing really really sucks. So, it's on them to do everything in their power to ensure that they don't lose. That means taking care of their equipment, (it's not mom's responsibility for you to bring your water and your mouthpiece etc. If they show up without that stuff, they run laps.) Showing up to practice on time and working hard the entire practice. It means working together not against each other, and considering the team as family. If they've done all they could and lose a game anyway, then they have nothing to feel bad about. They just flat out got beat by a better team.

4) Lastly, but not least, school comes first. If they are jacking around in school and getting in trouble, they don't play. Period. Get your homework done right after school so practice won't get in the way.

At this age, you are not just teaching them how to play football, but how to be team players, leaders, good winners and good losers. In short, you are teaching them how to be men.

Do you remember your first football coach? I do. They will remember you. Hopefully it will be a positive memory.

Good luck, you are doing a great thing. My son moved on to high school football a couple of years ago, but I'm still coaching, because I honestly love to do it. Don't know when I'll quit...

CrazyPhuD
08-19-2009, 06:55 AM
Kick every player hard in the balls before every practice to see who forgot to wear their cup that day.

Braincase
08-19-2009, 07:05 AM
I'm coaching a 2nd/3rd grade team as well, 2nd year. I'm supposed to be the head coach, but my role is primarily general manager, as we have a former KU player that has been a head coach at the junior high level and has years more experience than I, so I'm getting a chance to learn from him before I move up and take on the head coach role for real with the 4th grade team. You have to take control of the boys, because if they're jacking around and listening, they might miss out on some piece of info that will keep them from getting injured. They're going to get hurt - it's football. The last thing you want though is one of them getting their neck or back jacked up or worse because they weren't listening.

I've got one kid that is showing his true colors - he's obviously a bully. Not the biggest kid, but he has no problem pushing around kids that are smaller than him. He's pretty tough when he's going up against guys that are half his size. We decided to put him with the linemen yesterday. Bully weighs maybe 77-78 lbs., my son is 96, and a couple of 'em are over 120. He shifts around to match up against Brett, an experienced 3rd grader that played last year. Big mistake... Brett is quick, strong and his mom & dad got a divorce over the summer, so he's looking to hit somebody hard. I originally matched him up against a big, soft second grader that's playing for the first time, but he got another kid to switch with him. I let Bully discover his inner dumbass as he got plowed. I'm looking forward to matching him up against a couple of smaller players that like to hit, too.

rocks
08-19-2009, 07:24 AM
That is great. I have coached my sons team 4 years and my advice is: 1) you dont have to scream at a kid to get him to listen. Be a coach! 2) be willing to move kids around. Don't set a kid in a position for the year. 3) have a small number of plays that you can execute, execute, execute! Its not how fancy the play is, it is how well the kids can run them. I think this advice will help, we have been undefeated the last 2 years!

RJ
08-19-2009, 07:32 AM
Fresh fruit makes a for a tasty and nutritious snack, try that instead of cookies next time.

Your right tackle can't practice on Thursdays because he has piano lessons and your quarterback is going to miss the first game because his family is going to Disney World.

Just remember that your players are 8 year olds and you're all there to have fun.

BigRedChief
08-19-2009, 07:47 AM
Remember that your primary goal is to make sure each and every kid wants to come out and play football when they are 9.
This. Don't be a "tough" coach or tell them to rub dirt on it and get back out there. Kids are wanting to have fun at that age. If I get hurt doing something that is fun, why am I doing this? They are of a fragile mindset. Many a kid has been pushed off the field by an over zealous coach.

Going forward, find yourself 4 good linebackers and play a 3-4 defense. Offensive lines don't know how to block unless the guy is right in front of you until like 6th grade or so.

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 07:56 AM
I disagree slightly. I think instilling toughness and will to win is a good thing, but there is a fine line. You can't make it all about winning, but getting your ass kicked is not fun. Period. At least not in my world. The key is teaching them to win and lose gracefully, but for me, stress that the goal is to win. You can have fun to be sure. But, kids need to learn the difference between an injury and an owie. This builds character and makes them realize that they are capable of working through things. Of course, you as a coach must be able to tell if a kid is injured or just hurt. Sometimes telling them to "rub some dirt on it and get back out there" is just the ticket. Depends on the kid though, and only you as a coach know what your kids are capable of.

zhawkz
08-19-2009, 08:06 AM
This is indeed priority number ONE:
"Remember that your primary goal is to make sure each and every kid wants to come out and play football when they are 9." Everything flows from this thought. From there...

1. Make it fun. Conditioning is WAY overrated in youth football. Don't literally "run kids off". Celebrate when kids do something right. At the age of 8, they tend to screw off LESS than a 13 year old, so not too hard to keep their attention. But yes crack down if you have a "problem child" as they will cause problems with other kids too.
2. Do form tackling each and every day. Start very slowly, stressing fundamentals (head up...see what you are tackling...keep your feet and hips under you...hit, wrap, lift, drive...etc.) and gradually working your way to 1/2 speed, 3/4 speed. Nothing better than having a team of kids who can tackle. If you do nothing else this year...teach them how to tackle properly.
3. SIMPLIFIY. On offense and defense. The answer is NOT adding plays or sets or alignments. Work with a set of plays that work off of each other. Deception works well at this age.
4. Get enough help so you can keep all the kids busy (stations). Getting the RIGHT help is important. Parents who know what they are doing and same page as you.

kcmaxwell
08-19-2009, 08:06 AM
I've been coaching my son's football team since the second grade... It is an awesome experience! I am still amazed at how fast they pick up stuff! My boy is in the 8th grade this year, so it's my last year to help before high school, and I am already bumming about not being involved!! I would recommend working the O-line pretty hard, they are the key to everything... we do a drill where they come out of their stance and fire an eight pound medicine ball to the guys across from them. This does alot to improve their punch, especially in pass blocking. its a good one... good luck to you and have fun!! Where does your team play?
maxwell

Buck
08-19-2009, 08:07 AM
I did when I was in high school.

From my sophomore year to senior year. I coached the O-Line. Granted, I wasn't an expert, but I sure knew a lot more than 7, 8, and lastly 9 year olds.

It was really fun. It was in the league I played in growing up.

brophog
08-19-2009, 08:14 AM
The 3-4? That's not a youth football defense. It's all about the basics at that age, and that usually means things like 8 man fronts. Most youth defenses are some derivative of a 6-2 or 5-3, dependent on technique and coverage for specific alignments. A 3-4 if a waste at that age because most offenses you face are things like the Wing T, Veer, or other run dependent sequence based offenses. The kids just don't throw well enough at that age.

If you don't have a solid background in defensive football, then keep it simple. Kids learn man coverage easily, and your CBs in those schemes are mostly force players, anyhow. Concentrate on simple concepts like force and contain. Kids understand pretty easily if you tell them you don't want anyone getting outside of them. Practice your run fits and your tackling. As long as they know where to run to and how to tackle when they get there, you'll be OK.

ROYC75
08-19-2009, 08:22 AM
I'm coaching for the first time. It's a rewarding experience. Have any of you guys ever done this before? Any advice?


Fundamentals and make it fun for them. Patience, No wait, you are a Chiefs fan, you have that already. Keep it simple and work fundamentals, make sure they know them well before the Jr High level. Basic stuff, a lot of misdirection stuff is just too much for them, too complicated they can not comprehend the fancy plays and do not over load them with too many plays.. Tackling is a key, Hit, wrap, lift, drive and grab and always keep your head up and your shoulders square ,is how I coach them. Teaching them how to block, pass and run block, shedding blocks etc. Teach the QB's to secure the snap, proper foot work and release, keeping the shoulders in position and always landing on his back foot to be prepared to throw the ball.

I'm on my 3rd year in a row, the previous 2 we won the( 2nd,3rd& 4th grade) County championship at the lower lever.I'm picked to win the upper level this year in my 1st year of the upper level ( 5 & 6 grade boys). I have 1 4th grade kid playing up because of his talent. So just get the same kids to come back and learn on a higher level is the ticket.

I keep a routine practice, the kids know it each day . Spend a little time each day on certain stuff, allow water breaks between the drills. If you catch them slacking, remind them they are losing focus and will have to run if they continue to slack. Never let them dictate what they want to do , but try to get all involved in everything if you can, it makes them feel they are getting a fair chance to do the same as the next kid. Sometimes spend a little after practice one on one with a certain player and always praise them what they do well and always work on the things they do not do well the most .

Like I said, I moved up a level this year and I had most of the kids in this level that didn't know me , their parents asked to be on my team. Naturally we drafted the players so many did not get their wish.

Good Luck and have fun.

ROYC75
08-19-2009, 08:32 AM
This. Don't be a "tough" coach or tell them to rub dirt on it and get back out there. Kids are wanting to have fun at that age. If I get hurt doing something that is fun, why am I doing this? They are of a fragile mindset. Many a kid has been pushed off the field by an over zealous coach.

Going forward, find yourself 4 good linebackers and play a 3-4 defense. Offensive lines don't know how to block unless the guy is right in front of you until like 6th grade or so.

4 good LB's is a key, but I try to stay away from a 3-4 in the lower level. I use a 4-4 or a 5 - 4, it gets more kids involved up front, at that level you do very little passing, it's all running.

We are at the upper level of our program now, I still do not plan on using a 3-4. Reason, most kids at that level are still not discipline enough to play it .

But make it fun, I have 7 out of 12 players off last years team that went undefeated. Teaching fundamentals, all the basic stuff and winning will take care of itself.

BigRedChief
08-19-2009, 08:35 AM
4 good LB's is a key, but I try to stay away from a 3-4 in the lower level. I use a 4-4 or a 5 - 5, it gets more kids involved up front, at that level you do very little passing, it's all running.

We are at the upper level of our program now, I still do not plan on using a 3-4. Reason, most kids at that level are still not discipline enough to play it .

But make it fun, I have 7 out of 12 players off last years team that went undefeated. Teaching fundamentals, all the basic stuff and winning will take care of itself.
correct, you have to have 4 good ones to pull it off but if you do...you will own every team.

ROYC75
08-19-2009, 08:36 AM
This is indeed priority number ONE:
"Remember that your primary goal is to make sure each and every kid wants to come out and play football when they are 9." Everything flows from this thought. From there...

1. Make it fun. Conditioning is WAY overrated in youth football. Don't literally "run kids off". Celebrate when kids do something right. At the age of 8, they tend to screw off LESS than a 13 year old, so not too hard to keep their attention. But yes crack down if you have a "problem child" as they will cause problems with other kids too.
2. Do form tackling each and every day. Start very slowly, stressing fundamentals (head up...see what you are tackling...keep your feet and hips under you...hit, wrap, lift, drive...etc.) and gradually working your way to 1/2 speed, 3/4 speed. Nothing better than having a team of kids who can tackle. If you do nothing else this year...teach them how to tackle properly.
3. SIMPLIFIY. On offense and defense. The answer is NOT adding plays or sets or alignments. Work with a set of plays that work off of each other. Deception works well at this age.
4. Get enough help so you can keep all the kids busy (stations). Getting the RIGHT help is important. Parents who know what they are doing and same page as you.

Good, I typed mine before ever reading your post !

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 09:06 AM
I am against tackle football before high school

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 09:09 AM
I am against tackle football before high school

:spock: Why??

gblowfish
08-19-2009, 09:29 AM
So your saying don't do the Oklahoma drill over and over again until one of them passes out?

.....let me mark that down.

Funny you should say that. Back in the 1960s when I played little league football, that's EXACTLY what our coaches did. We also had to run till we puked once, because we lost to a guy he worked with. Brutal.

And NO WATER during practice.

Things have changed a lot since then... thank goodness.

RippedmyFlesh
08-19-2009, 09:47 AM
I'm coaching for the first time. It's a rewarding experience. Have any of you guys ever done this before? Any advice?
I helped coach my son's pop warner team years ago and loved it.
A few "rules" to make it a positive experience.
#1 Make it fun for the players.
A good example(I helped coach lineman)
The Oklahoma drill
A tough drill for pros and college players but fun for the little guys.It would give fat slow bobby a chance to run with the ball something he prob will never do in a real game. So much more fun than hitting the sled.

#2 Only be tough on the most talented players.
I never went haley on any of the kids but the more talented kids I always leaned on more. And it was always the attitude of "you have talent I expect more from you" as opposed to well going haley on them.

#3 Don't be a douche bag NFL wanna be coach. Remember they are kids out there to have fun. Nothing you do is going to make them a 1st round pick but if you are an ass clown you could turn them off sports at an early age.

Lastly praise even the slightest improvement. Kids want your admiration but they are smarter than you think so don't be a soccer coach"everyone is good billy" type.
They see through that stuff easier than you think.

Have fun you will love it when you see kids getting better.

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 09:49 AM
:spock: Why??

I think it is too young to have people with that kind of contact, especially with kids that have different levels of strength. I think the level of coaching, training, etc should be left up to people where coaching and teaching our their jobs. I know most contact drills have been elimnated in the youth game, so why not just have them play flag football until contact drills are permitted so they can learn how to tackle and block under correct supervision.

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 09:52 AM
I also think kids can't correctly identify when they have head injuries like being concussed. How are you supposed to know has symptoms of a head injury when they are that young? They could just be a kid, tired, or they could a really dumb kid or retarded.

RippedmyFlesh
08-19-2009, 10:00 AM
I am against tackle football before high school

Playing football early was the best thing for my son.
He got alot of exercise and was much healthier than the kids he hung out with who didn't play and stayed inside all day playing video games.

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:11 AM
Playing football early was the best thing for my son.
He got alot of exercise and was much healthier than the kids he hung out with who didn't play and stayed inside all day playing video games.

well hopefully he doesn't have any lasting brain damage. Which as I stated earlier is hard to tell with kids. Just being around the game so long if you want to have your kid exersise that is fine touch football or soccer is the way to go. If you want to justify your life with hey my kid is awesomely awesome and healthy that is fine. Lets not ignore the facts of how many kids have injuries do to football a year.

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 10:12 AM
I think it is too young to have people with that kind of contact, especially with kids that have different levels of strength. I think the level of coaching, training, etc should be left up to people where coaching and teaching our their jobs. I know most contact drills have been elimnated in the youth game, so why not just have them play flag football until contact drills are permitted so they can learn how to tackle and block under correct supervision.

Holy crap dude. Better not let the boys have any contact at all, probably should wrap em in a cocoon until high school.

No offense, but that is the kind of thinking that causes kids to sit home playing video games and turning into pussies. Besides, if you never had any contact before high school, I guarantee people would not play the game. Your kid can get hurt playing football, yes. But they can also get hurt wrestling around with their buddies, or riding their bike, or swimming, or whatever.

I think more kids need to get off their asses and play some football, and tackle football is the way to go. Ask anyone in the NFL, I guarantee you they've been playing since they were 8 years old or so. It teaches toughness, teamwork, and brings a camaraderie unlike any other sport can, because they all go through the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together. And when the season is over and they survived, they look back on a true accomplishment.

I understand people worrying about their kids being injured, but...come on!!

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:24 AM
Holy crap dude. Better not let the boys have any contact at all, probably should wrap em in a cocoon until high school.

No offense, but that is the kind of thinking that causes kids to sit home playing video games and turning into pussies. Besides, if you never had any contact before high school, I guarantee people would not play the game. Your kid can get hurt playing football, yes. But they can also get hurt wrestling around with their buddies, or riding their bike, or swimming, or whatever.

I think more kids need to get off their asses and play some football, and tackle football is the way to go. Ask anyone in the NFL, I guarantee you they've been playing since they were 8 years old or so. It teaches toughness, teamwork, and brings a camaraderie unlike any other sport can, because they all go through the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together. And when the season is over and they survived, they look back on a true accomplishment.

I understand people worrying about their kids being injured, but...come on!!



Well I can name two players that didn't play until they were old right off my head Okoye and Antonio Gates

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:25 AM
again there are other ways for your kid to get exersise without the head injuries soccer touch football are two of them

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:29 AM
Holy crap dude. Better not let the boys have any contact at all, probably should wrap em in a cocoon until high school.

No offense, but that is the kind of thinking that causes kids to sit home playing video games and turning into pussies. Besides, if you never had any contact before high school, I guarantee people would not play the game. Your kid can get hurt playing football, yes. But they can also get hurt wrestling around with their buddies, or riding their bike, or swimming, or whatever.

I think more kids need to get off their asses and play some football, and tackle football is the way to go. Ask anyone in the NFL, I guarantee you they've been playing since they were 8 years old or so. It teaches toughness, teamwork, and brings a camaraderie unlike any other sport can, because they all go through the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together. And when the season is over and they survived, they look back on a true accomplishment.

I understand people worrying about their kids being injured, but...come on!!


you also bring up the point of the NFL, but the only nfl supported league for youth is flag football.

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:30 AM
nfl supports flag football in their commercials

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 10:37 AM
you also bring up the point of the NFL, but the only nfl supported league for youth is flag football.

Not according to PopWarner football. USA Football, which was started by the NFLPA in 2002, is a supporter of Pop Warner.

http://www.popwarner.com/articles/lloydrodriguez.asp

Demonpenz
08-19-2009, 10:41 AM
Not according to PopWarner football. USA Football, which was started by the NFLPA in 2002, is a supporter of Pop Warner.

http://www.popwarner.com/articles/lloydrodriguez.asp

yeah I edited it I was wrong.

MVChiefFan
08-19-2009, 10:46 AM
I was a ref for mighty might football for three years. A word of advice...the center sneak is NOT a legal play. I learned that the hard way.

Chiefnj2
08-19-2009, 11:01 AM
"It teaches toughness, teamwork, and brings a camaraderie unlike any other sport can, because they all go through the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together."

8 year old kids who are being introduced to the game for the first time shouldn't be looking back on the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together. They should be having fun and learning to appreciate the game.

Mr. Krab
08-19-2009, 11:04 AM
Fun and Teaching > winning

Even though at that age if you teach them well they have a chance to win.

RJ
08-19-2009, 11:14 AM
Funny you should say that. Back in the 1960s when I played little league football, that's EXACTLY what our coaches did. We also had to run till we puked once, because we lost to a guy he worked with. Brutal.

And NO WATER during practice.

Things have changed a lot since then... thank goodness.



Yes, I remember it well.

"No water, it'll make you sick!!".

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 12:10 PM
"It teaches toughness, teamwork, and brings a camaraderie unlike any other sport can, because they all go through the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together."

8 year old kids who are being introduced to the game for the first time shouldn't be looking back on the bumps, bruises, aches and pains together. They should be having fun and learning to appreciate the game.

Then kids today are just flat out wussier than we were when I was a kid. Except in Nebraska. We don't mind a little rough and tumble here. That IS having fun and learning to appreciate the game...

But, I suppose if you don't want your kid in a contact sport, don't sign him up. Problem solved.

RJ
08-19-2009, 12:12 PM
Wussier?

InChiefsHell
08-19-2009, 01:33 PM
Wussier?

...heh. I was at a loss...

Ari Chi3fs
08-19-2009, 03:15 PM
I wonder how quickly it will take the kids to recognize what a collosal douchebag Chiefaroo is?

I feel sorry for those kids.

Skip Towne
08-19-2009, 03:51 PM
I wonder how quickly it will take the kids to recognize what a collosal douchebag Chiefaroo is?

I feel sorry for those kids.

They could probably tell when they first met him. He has a Wichita accent.

ChiefaRoo
08-19-2009, 10:02 PM
Ari calling me a douche? Oh the irony.

ChiefaRoo
08-19-2009, 10:10 PM
4 good LB's is a key, but I try to stay away from a 3-4 in the lower level. I use a 4-4 or a 5 - 4, it gets more kids involved up front, at that level you do very little passing, it's all running.

We are at the upper level of our program now, I still do not plan on using a 3-4. Reason, most kids at that level are still not discipline enough to play it .

But make it fun, I have 7 out of 12 players off last years team that went undefeated. Teaching fundamentals, all the basic stuff and winning will take care of itself.

We're playing a 4-3 with a Rover or Monster back. I'm just a n00b coach but if it was me I'd run a 6 man front with the ends containing the play (which would contain the sweeps) and rushing the passer on occasion. There's not much chance of having any 8 year old who can wing the ball much less another 8 year old who can catch it with a man on them.

KCBOSS1
08-19-2009, 10:25 PM
Actually, I've done this exact thing. The coach was an insane guy with a rediculous temper. It was silly. I had to call him on it, then he calmed down. But yeah, it was really fun most of the time.

ROYC75
08-19-2009, 10:26 PM
We're playing a 4-3 with a Rover or Monster back. I'm just a n00b coach but if it was me I'd run a 6 man front with the ends containing the play (which would contain the sweeps) and rushing the passer on occasion. There's not much chance of having any 8 year old who can wing the ball much less another 8 year old who can catch it with a man on them.

8 & 9 year old kids, you can get away with several guys up front, 4-4 , 5-4,5-3, ,6-3, etc.

ChiefaRoo
08-19-2009, 10:42 PM
I'm now entering my 8th season coaching tackle. I've been an assistant the whole time, because I'm not much of a x's and o's guy, I work with kids on positions and techniques. What I've learned over the last 7 years is:

1) You start out strict and hard with these boys. I've coached from 8 year olds all the way to 12 year olds and back again. Regardless of age, these boys want, NEED to be whipped into shape. That doesn't mean screaming and swearing, it means consistency and getting them to understand your expectations from the get go. If you start soft, you will lose. It's happened to us a couple of times. Somehow, we started a season soft, and they reacted and became a soft team.

2) Get a grip on the parents from day one. Make sure they know that YOU are the coach and that if they have any issues or problems that you are happy to speak with them about it AFTER the game or AFTER practice. Let them know that they need to encourage their kid at games, not coach him (or her as the case may be).

3) We started this year a little earlier, which is great. We are having our 3rd practice tomorrow, and all we are doing is running their little couch potato asses off and teaching footwork drills. Get them into the mindset of hard work early, they will be hungry to hit and play ball by the time they get pads on. Running sucks. Just ask the Chiefs...heheheh...

4) At the beginning of every season, I explain to the boys that winning is NOT everything...but losing really really sucks. So, it's on them to do everything in their power to ensure that they don't lose. That means taking care of their equipment, (it's not mom's responsibility for you to bring your water and your mouthpiece etc. If they show up without that stuff, they run laps.) Showing up to practice on time and working hard the entire practice. It means working together not against each other, and considering the team as family. If they've done all they could and lose a game anyway, then they have nothing to feel bad about. They just flat out got beat by a better team.

4) Lastly, but not least, school comes first. If they are jacking around in school and getting in trouble, they don't play. Period. Get your homework done right after school so practice won't get in the way.

At this age, you are not just teaching them how to play football, but how to be team players, leaders, good winners and good losers. In short, you are teaching them how to be men.

Do you remember your first football coach? I do. They will remember you. Hopefully it will be a positive memory.

Good luck, you are doing a great thing. My son moved on to high school football a couple of years ago, but I'm still coaching, because I honestly love to do it. Don't know when I'll quit...


Good stuff. I was watching the head coach closely and he started out really soft with them for about 1/2 of the first padded practice. They were not focused and just were listless running through drills. He got kind of fired up after watching that and gathered them around and let them know that he wanted them to get fired up and have some fun and play hard. It got a lot better after that and each practice the kids get better. I would not of thought a coach could lose an 8 year old team but I can see where it can happen.

When I got certified to coach the league head went through about 30 minutes on unruly parents. There is one guy whose kid is playing who got banned from baseball this year and they're all worried he's gonna freak out in the stands in football. They even talked about having a cop clued into this guy and his potential for going over the top. I was like WTF?... welcome to TX football. :)

cardken
08-19-2009, 11:29 PM
Coached for 5 years in Louisville, 3 years 8-9 YO, 1 year 10-11 yO and 1 year 12-14 YO.
Patience with the younger set is paramount. Never yell to berate, only to get their attention and in a none threatening way. With the Parents, let them talk , but give little consideration, they had the opportunity to take the position, no one has ever benefited from an Arm chair Quarterback. Make sure everybody gets playtime, even when the less talented seem like a death nail to your gameplan, I've been surprised more than once in how one plays come gametime. Plenty of drills during practice and scrimmage, Balance your time, get all the fundimentals covered, and keep quizzing them during practice keeps them focused, those not focused make run, does wonders. Always preach and practice good sportsmanship, even when the other team doesn't, and officials don't win or lose games.
All children are different, some need more attention and teaching than others. I had a great time in my tenure as Coach, and was successful. Five seasons, 8 games each season, overall record was 30-9-1, one championship, and two runners ups. I always had a great bonding and opportunity to shape the Kids opinion of sports for their entire life. I always told them at the last game it was an honor and a privilege to Coach them, it seemed to go along way. It can be a really great experience.

InChiefsHell
08-20-2009, 07:20 AM
Good stuff. I was watching the head coach closely and he started out really soft with them for about 1/2 of the first padded practice. They were not focused and just were listless running through drills. He got kind of fired up after watching that and gathered them around and let them know that he wanted them to get fired up and have some fun and play hard. It got a lot better after that and each practice the kids get better. I would not of thought a coach could lose an 8 year old team but I can see where it can happen.

When I got certified to coach the league head went through about 30 minutes on unruly parents. There is one guy whose kid is playing who got banned from baseball this year and they're all worried he's gonna freak out in the stands in football. They even talked about having a cop clued into this guy and his potential for going over the top. I was like WTF?... welcome to TX football. :)

Ah yes, the parents...that's a whole other ball of shit aspect of coaching. I consider it the hazards of the job...if it weren't for parents, you wouldn't have any kids to coach, so I suppose they are a necessary evil. I've had all kinds, from the drunk dad to the single mom who thinks she's better than a dad and all points in between. Mostly, we've had really good parents though, and so far this season, I've only got one dad who is already getting on my nerves. He's just annoying, always wants to be on the field, constantly talking about his son (the biggest kid on our team) and how big and strong he is, how much ass he's kicked on the field in the past, blah blah. After awhile, you don't even look at him while he's talking in hopes that he'll get the message.

This weekend we don the pads, and I'm going to use that as an opportunity to tell him he needs to stay off the field during practice. Not sure how that will go, but I'm 38 and way past worrying about hurting the guys feelings.

Skip Towne
08-20-2009, 07:32 AM
The parents are what have kept me from coaching the kids.

Chiefnj2
08-20-2009, 08:16 AM
The best way to deal with unruly parents is for the league to be involved. If a ref is hearing a parent yell unacceptable things, or the parent is being abusive to the ref or other team, then the ref should give 1 warning to coaches who have to talk to the parent. Next time it happens it is a 15 yard penalty. If it happens a third time, you forfeit the game and the team gets fined by the league.

InChiefsHell
08-20-2009, 08:32 AM
The best way to deal with unruly parents is for the league to be involved. If a ref is hearing a parent yell unacceptable things, or the parent is being abusive to the ref or other team, then the ref should give 1 warning to coaches who have to talk to the parent. Next time it happens it is a 15 yard penalty. If it happens a third time, you forfeit the game and the team gets fined by the league.

Yeah, at our games if a parent gets stupid, it's up to US to control them. The Ref lets us know that we need to control the parent or it's a 15 yard penalty. So far, it's never been a problem. I've only had to talk to parents twice in 8 years, and as soon as I tell them to calm down or we'll be penalized, they get a little embarrassed and STFU.