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View Full Version : General Politics A thought on emergency care


Saul Good
08-19-2009, 09:23 PM
I just had an idea pop into my mind. It isn't fully-formed yet, and I don't know if I would even be in favor of it, but here goes...

Because hospitals can not deny emergency treatment, what if all ER care was single payer initially? That is, the government pays the hospital and then bills the patient. The ER would be required to authenticate the patient's identity prior to releasing them. If it turns out that the ER failed to obtain accurate information on the patient, they don't get paid.

Once the government bills the patient, insurance would apply just as it currently does. Anyone without coverage would have the bills treated as if they were a loan from the government. As with other federal loans, these would be non-bankruptable, and the government could place a lien on property, garnishee wages, etc. if they are not repaid.

What do you think?

Cave Johnson
08-20-2009, 09:25 AM
Are they billing them at the usual inflated rates, or what everyone with insurance pays?

BucEyedPea
08-20-2009, 09:28 AM
Are they billing them at the usual inflated rates, or what everyone with insurance pays?

The usual inflated rates are what all with insurance pay. It's when you don't have insurance and pay out of pocket you get a better deal. Try it sometime.

Cave Johnson
08-20-2009, 09:30 AM
The usual inflated rates are what all with insurance pay. It's when you don't have insurance and pay out of pocket you get a better deal. Try it sometime.

Barney Frank...... kitchen table..... what planet.

BucEyedPea
08-20-2009, 09:34 AM
Barney Frank...... kitchen table..... what planet.

Huh! Sounds like you got nuthin'!

It's cheaper when you pay cash. I had $10k knocked off a bill if I decided to not use my deductible. Got other services half price too. Insurance results in providers charging higher fees. Here's another example: visit to my GP billed on insurance at $350. If I paid out of pocket $120. In the meantime chiro visits run anywhere from $30 to $50 ( 0n the high side for a visit where you get more than just a chat....but actual treatment.) That's 'cause many more chiros operate in a free-market. Some refuse to accept insurance because insurance dictates how they are to treat the patient. Nice huh?

CoMoChief
08-20-2009, 09:37 AM
I just had an idea pop into my mind. It isn't fully-formed yet, and I don't know if I would even be in favor of it, but here goes...

Because hospitals can not deny emergency treatment, what if all ER care was single payer initially? That is, the government pays the hospital and then bills the patient. The ER would be required to authenticate the patient's identity prior to releasing them. If it turns out that the ER failed to obtain accurate information on the patient, they don't get paid.

Once the government bills the patient, insurance would apply just as it currently does. Anyone without coverage would have the bills treated as if they were a loan from the government. As with other federal loans, these would be non-bankruptable, and the government could place a lien on property, garnishee wages, etc. if they are not repaid.

What do you think?

Because most democrats and the people that "have no health care" are wanting all of this coverage for free at the cost of other tax paying Americans. You really think these people want to pay for anything???? OMG!!! You serious?

WilliamTheIrish
08-20-2009, 09:41 AM
... That is, the government pays the hospital and then bills the patient. The ER would be required to authenticate the patient's identity prior to releasing them....


1)How do you authenticate 80k Jose Garcia's?

2) Do you treat or authenticate first?

3) Regarding collection by the Gov't: How do you get money out of person who has no intention of working above the table or with no income?

4) Will the gov't reimburse actual costs?

Cave Johnson
08-20-2009, 10:10 AM
Huh! Sounds like you got nuthin'!

It's cheaper when you pay cash. I had $10k knocked off a bill if I decided to not use my deductible. Got other services half price too. Insurance results in providers charging higher fees. Here's another example: visit to my GP billed on insurance at $350. If I paid out of pocket $120. In the meantime chiro visits run anywhere from $30 to $50 ( 0n the high side for a visit where you get more than just a chat....but actual treatment.) That's 'cause many more chiros operate in a free-market. Some refuse to accept insurance because insurance dictates how they are to treat the patient. Nice huh?

I just skipped the providing the facts step, but this is just the pro forma BEP counters facts with anecdotes debate.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5290172/

And yes, I know the quote is a little anecdotal itself, but I'm just not going to bother trying to find a more authoritative one, because it doesn't effect the debate 1 iota.