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The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 10:34 PM
Well I'm set to start my new job next Monday. However, the special education coordinator calls me last Friday and says they are moving me from the position I accepted and interviewed for, to a completely different one, which I have no experience with.

Now mind you, I've been gathering materials all summer for this job. I've communicated extensively with the principal and formed some relationships in the building.

My workload is also going to increase, substancially.

I'm pretty aggravated that I would get shifted. I want to call her and talk to her about it, but I don't want to come across as a dick. I just think it's massively unfair that this switch happened a week before school. It will take me a good month to really settle into this position, whereas the other one I had 2 years experience with already.

Couple this with the birth of my first child, and I have zero time to get anything together in preperation.

This sucks. I think tomorrow I'm going to ask politely if I can stay at the position I have the experience with and all the materials for and see what happens.

Would you be annoyed?

Buehler445
08-23-2009, 10:39 PM
Affirmative.

Not a good way to start your new job.

sportsman1
08-23-2009, 10:39 PM
Yes.

pr_capone
08-23-2009, 10:40 PM
I would be annoyed but at the same time grateful that I have a job at all. With so many people out of work, most everyone is easily replaceable.

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 10:43 PM
I would be annoyed but at the same time grateful that I have a job at all. With so many people out of work, most everyone is easily replaceable.

See, I agree with that. However, I did turn down other offers because this job presented me the opportunity to stick with a subject area I had massive amounts of experience with.

I literally have nothing for this new position. I'm going in completely unprepared and I worry that my performance at this job will reflect that, and thus doom me if I wanted to leave after a year.

Do you think it would hurt to discuss with the coordinator my feelings on it? She called me at the worst time on Friday when I was with my son at his first doctor's appt.

DeezNutz
08-23-2009, 10:48 PM
Wasn't this also an opportunity to make more money compared to one of your other offers? And aren't you closer to home? Might be making that last one up...

Just saying, things could be worse.

Think of this as a way of broadening your areas, thus making you even more marketable in the future, if you so choose.

Bright side, dude. Bright side. Plus, if you take this switch on, embrace it, and kick ass, you'll be gaining a lot of respect from your new colleagues and bosses and what not.

pr_capone
08-23-2009, 10:49 PM
See, I agree with that. However, I did turn down other offers because this job presented me the opportunity to stick with a subject area I had massive amounts of experience with.

I literally have nothing for this new position. I'm going in completely unprepared and I worry that my performance at this job will reflect that, and thus doom me if I wanted to leave after a year.

Do you think it would hurt to discuss with the coordinator my feelings on it? She called me at the worst time on Friday when I was with my son at his first doctor's appt.

I would definitely talk to the coordinator and air out your concerns regarding the new position. Let them know what you would prefer to do but reassure them that you are ready to take on the new position if there is not an option to reclaim your old one.

Then do your damn best.

Baconeater
08-23-2009, 10:49 PM
Pissed wouldn't be the word for me...more like livid.

I suppose the amount of fuss you can raise about it would be proportionate to the number of other options you have.

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 10:50 PM
Wasn't this also an opportunity to make more money compared to one of your other offers? And aren't you closer to home? Might be making that last one up...

Just saying, things could be worse.

Think of this as a way of broadening your areas, thus making you even more marketable in the future, if you so choose.

Bright side, dude. Bright side. Plus, if you take this switch on, embrace it, and kick ass, you'll be gaining a lot of respect from your new colleagues and bosses and what not.

With the shift, I'm much further away from my house. It's about 30 miles a day difference.

I'll give it my all. I just think it's really shitty to do the week before school. The principal at the other school didn't even know about it until I e-mailed him.

It can't hurt to just talk to her. If after talking to her, they won't budge, I'll stick it out and dominate.

Bwana
08-23-2009, 10:51 PM
Very

BigMeatballDave
08-23-2009, 10:52 PM
I'd be fucking furious.

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 10:53 PM
Pissed wouldn't be the word for me...more like livid.

I suppose the amount of fuss you can raise about it would be proportionate to the number of other options you have.

Which would be zero with the school year starting. That's the shitty part. For a month and a half now, I've been preparing for this other job. I've created materials, had colleagues at my old job send me worksheets and strategies, I've even been setting up my classroom.

Now all of that is worth shit.

I can't risk the job with a week old baby at home now, but I sure as hell would like to find out what prompted this, and how can they expect me to succeed at this job.

BigMeatballDave
08-23-2009, 10:53 PM
I would be annoyed but at the same time grateful that I have a job at all. With so many people out of work, most everyone is easily replaceable.Well, there is this, because I am in this situation, but this is beside the point.

DeezNutz
08-23-2009, 10:56 PM
With the shift, I'm much further away from my house. It's about 30 miles a day difference.

I'll give it my all. I just think it's really shitty to do the week before school. The principal at the other school didn't even know about it until I e-mailed him.

It can't hurt to just talk to her. If after talking to her, they won't budge, I'll stick it out and dominate.

Yep. I understand and agree.

The biggest thing is that it's a red flag about the level of professionalism that they're showing. You don't drop a bombshell like this on someone a week out from the new job.

But the underlined is the type of attitude that one has to take into these kinds of shitty situations. And perhaps you'll be pleasantly surprised when the dust settles...

BigMeatballDave
08-23-2009, 10:58 PM
Which would be zero with the school year starting. That's the shitty part. For a month and a half now, I've been preparing for this other job. I've created materials, had colleagues at my old job send me worksheets and strategies, I've even been setting up my classroom.

Now all of that is worth shit.

I can't risk the job with a week old baby at home now, but I sure as hell would like to find out what prompted this, and how can they expect me to succeed at this job.
I would explain this to whoever changed your position.

pr_capone
08-23-2009, 10:58 PM
Yep. I understand and agree.

The biggest thing is that it's a red flag about the level of professionalism that they're showing. You don't drop a bombshell like this on someone a week out from the new job.

But the underlined is the type of attitude that one has to take into these kinds of shitty situations. And perhaps you'll be pleasantly surprised when the dust settles...

[thread hijack]

I'd like to ask you about Deez!

[/thread hijack]

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 10:59 PM
Yep. I understand and agree.

The biggest thing is that it's a red flag about the level of professionalism that they're showing. You don't drop a bombshell like this on someone a week out from the new job.

But the underlined is the type of attitude that one has to take into these kinds of shitty situations. And perhaps you'll be pleasantly surprised when the dust settles...

All great points.

There are some pros to this job. I'd be working with high school kids as opposed to elementary. I'd have more breaks during the day.

But the learning curve might kill me the first couple weeks and months. I think they should have presented this as an option, not a directive. I've been a real good solider this summer for them by attending workshops (unpaid) and creating relationships at the place I was supposed to work.

It just sucks. I don't need the added stress with already getting zero sleep from my one-week old being up roughly 23 hours a day.

Baconeater
08-23-2009, 11:03 PM
Which would be zero with the school year starting. That's the shitty part. For a month and a half now, I've been preparing for this other job. I've created materials, had colleagues at my old job send me worksheets and strategies, I've even been setting up my classroom.

Now all of that is worth shit.

I can't risk the job with a week old baby at home now, but I sure as hell would like to find out what prompted this, and how can they expect me to succeed at this job.
Yeah, I'd say you deserve an explanation at the very least. This sounds odd, although I'm admittedly unfamiliar with how a typical school system operates.

Didn't you relocate for this job as well?

ChiefJustice
08-23-2009, 11:27 PM
What exactly was the change that was made?

What subject?

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 11:28 PM
What exactly was the change that was made?

What subject?

Elementary learning support to high school emotional support.

I didn't relocate for the job, I did it to be closer to family.

Miles
08-23-2009, 11:34 PM
Do you feel comfortable with having a candid conversation about this with who gave you this news or someone that would matter?

The Bad Guy
08-23-2009, 11:37 PM
Do you feel comfortable with having a candid conversation about this with who gave you this news or someone that would matter?

Yes and no. I don't want to come across that I couldn't do the new job, but I want to express how prepared I am to do the old one and see if I could possibly stay there.

Raised On Riots
08-23-2009, 11:37 PM
With the shift, I'm much further away from my house. It's about 30 miles a day difference.

I'll give it my all. I just think it's really shitty to do the week before school. The principal at the other school didn't even know about it until I e-mailed him.

It can't hurt to just talk to her. If after talking to her, they won't budge, I'll stick it out and dominate.

Hey man, what PR Capone said sounds best. My bosses wife is a teachers aid, and the majority of them got canned at the end of the semester before summer break. Luckily, she got her job back before the start of this year.

But I'm just saying; the economy is crap, is not projected to bottom out for real until 2012, and you've got that new baby. Everything pretty much sucks all over and if you've been given the opportunity to dig-in with a steady job and money, you really should and just ride it out.

Good luck to you, and I mean that.

Miles
08-23-2009, 11:56 PM
Yes and no. I don't want to come across that I couldn't do the new job, but I want to express how prepared I am to do the old one and see if I could possibly stay there.

Sounds tricky for sure. Is there much chance of them sending you back to your previous position?

Seems like you might be able to at least let them know what you have done to prep and that you will put that same effort and enthusiasm into the new position.

cdcox
08-24-2009, 12:22 AM
From the other side: I did something similar to a colleague a year ago. I gave him an increased teaching responsibility with about a 2 mos notice. Basically the course needed to be taught and he was the one with the lightest load. I fully understood that it would be a lot of extra work for him, probably cause him to work additional hours, and would be a total pain in the ass for him. I still gave the job to him because it was the best of a few bad options. We discussed it for a few hours during which time he shared his perspective (which I already knew before I made the decision) and we went ahead with it. He had to suck it up and do the needed thing. That's pretty much the real world.

You can give your perspective, but chances are the powers-that-be have already considered your situation in the process of making the decision to give you this assignment. Your best bet to help yourself is to indicate that you'll do your best in the new assignment despite the difficulties. Use it as an opportunity to demonstrate your adaptability, willingness to contribute to the good of the organization, and ability to perform under non-ideal conditions. It will pay off down the road.

KCChiefsMan
08-24-2009, 01:43 AM
ya, you got screwed, I'd be pissed too. Unless you have another option you pretty much just have to deal with it. But I would start looking around for something else.

Valiant
08-24-2009, 02:34 AM
From the other side: I did something similar to a colleague a year ago. I gave him an increased teaching responsibility with about a 2 mos notice. Basically the course needed to be taught and he was the one with the lightest load. I fully understood that it would be a lot of extra work for him, probably cause him to work additional hours, and would be a total pain in the ass for him. I still gave the job to him because it was the best of a few bad options. We discussed it for a few hours during which time he shared his perspective (which I already knew before I made the decision) and we went ahead with it. He had to suck it up and do the needed thing. That's pretty much the real world.

You can give your perspective, but chances are the powers-that-be have already considered your situation in the process of making the decision to give you this assignment. Your best bet to help yourself is to indicate that you'll do your best in the new assignment despite the difficulties. Use it as an opportunity to demonstrate your adaptability, willingness to contribute to the good of the organization, and ability to perform under non-ideal conditions. It will pay off down the road.

Two months and two weeks are completely different in being able to prepare a curriculum for students in a class you have not taught..

As for your story, it basically says.. I could get away with it, so I did it. But I will put a nice spin to it so it makes it seem I am helping the person in the long run as a character builder...

It is a great way to lose good staff..

Guru
08-24-2009, 02:49 AM
man, that sucks. I would be extremely upset to put it lightly. With the economy the way it is though, just tread carefully in how you choose to deal with it is all I would say.

MoreLemonPledge
08-24-2009, 03:18 AM
That's really shitty, but everything is a learning experience. Make the best of it and perhaps you'll find out that you enjoy your new job. I'm a big believer in change being good and everything happening for a reason.

stumppy
08-24-2009, 03:46 AM
Find a job somewhere else. Drop that bombshell on them about a week before work starts. Then tell them not to worry, you already have an excellent replacement already lined up. Send GoChiefs in for the interview.


That'll teach em.:D

kepp
08-24-2009, 07:08 AM
Two things:

1. It can't hurt to develop new professional skills.
2. If they're moving you to an area where they know you don't have much experience, I would think that means they have a lot of faith and trust in your skills.

the Talking Can
08-24-2009, 07:22 AM
yes

unless someone just died and you are the only option, this is a major red flag...it is a sign of an organization that is poorly organized, and terrible at communication, both of which are indicators of mild to major contempt for their workers...good leaders don't get into situations like this unless tragedies strike..

but the only thing you can do in the short term is to bust your ass and succeed...complaining won't matter, if they cared about you in the first place they wouldn't have treated you this way....remember this: you can only hurt yourself by grousing or slacking...it is unfair, but that's life...

i was in a similar situation, and I promised myself that I would find a new job asap...so i went about my job as best i could, killing them with kindness, and eventually a found a better job (took almost a year) and had the distinct pleasure of walking into a manager's office and saying "adios, this shithole is all yours now..."

being in education, you probably don't can't switch jobs as easily, and the economy is for shit, but I would have a long term goal of finding a workplace that values you and treats you with respect - they exist....until then, don't do anything to risk your job or to give them an excuse to get rid of you...

and people saying you will be rewarded for this eventually are out to lunch...you won't get a raise or a bag of cash or anything....you'll get a plaque some day that says "thanks for allowing incompetent management to cover their ass and keep their six figure jobs, we never cared about you, here is a coupon for a watch at Wal Mart, sucker"

Chiefnj2
08-24-2009, 07:27 AM
Under the no child left behind act, aren't there minimum teaching requirements for certain positions? Unless it is an emergency or temporary reassignment, can they move a teacher to a position in which the teacher has no experience whatsoever?

dirk digler
08-24-2009, 07:27 AM
I would be extremely pissed. Did you sign any kind of contract?

Reerun_KC
08-24-2009, 07:33 AM
Well I'm set to start my new job next Monday. However, the special education coordinator calls me last Friday and says they are moving me from the position I accepted and interviewed for, to a completely different one, which I have no experience with.

Now mind you, I've been gathering materials all summer for this job. I've communicated extensively with the principal and formed some relationships in the building.

My workload is also going to increase, substancially.

I'm pretty aggravated that I would get shifted. I want to call her and talk to her about it, but I don't want to come across as a dick. I just think it's massively unfair that this switch happened a week before school. It will take me a good month to really settle into this position, whereas the other one I had 2 years experience with already.

Couple this with the birth of my first child, and I have zero time to get anything together in preperation.

This sucks. I think tomorrow I'm going to ask politely if I can stay at the position I have the experience with and all the materials for and see what happens.

Would you be annoyed?
Shit you have already failed! LMAO

Skip Towne
08-24-2009, 07:44 AM
It sounds to me like they are in a bind and moving you was their best, maybe their only, option. I would talk to them about it but be prepared to do what they want. It will add to your resume. Let us know what happens.

Iowanian
08-24-2009, 07:51 AM
You're getting screwed a little, but you can do 2 things.

1. bail
2. View this as an opportunity to expand on your experience in the field and make yourself more valuable to that district or more marketable to others.

LTL
08-24-2009, 08:07 AM
Did they give you any reason as to why they moved you? If not, I would at least call and find that out. Somebody may have quit and left them with very few alternatives and you were their best option for now.

I don't know how the district you are in works, but I know from listening to my sister and nephew it seems like the newer teachers end up with the short end of the stick quite a few times due to them not having tenure. Somebody that has been with the district say 10 years who is more qualified to do a position won't and in some cases don't have to take on things they don't want to because of that.

Could very well be wrong on that, either though, would at least try and find out why first.

Simplex3
08-24-2009, 08:11 AM
You don't drop a bombshell like this on someone a week out from the new job.

Sounds to me like some friend of hers just got their dream job at the Bad Guy's expense.

I'd be talking to the coordinator and if I didn't get a suitable response I'd be asking her to bring her boss in to explain it to both of us.

The Bad Guy
08-24-2009, 08:12 AM
Well I did find out that the reason the position is open is because the emotional support teacher in the high school was appointed to the vice principal post.

The thing that bugs me (and I haven't called yet) is that the special ed. coordinator said the reason I was hired for the elementary position is because of my experience.

Demonpenz
08-24-2009, 08:13 AM
Do as little as possible bitch and moan throughouth then put it on your resume as a learning experience