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View Full Version : Food and Drink So I tried something new today...


keg in kc
09-09-2009, 02:09 PM
Brined some chicken for lunch. Holy cow. Moist and juicy goodness.

I probably shouldn't say holy cow since it was fowl. Anyway, I'm trying to eat a few more of the things I should, and I think this may help me as far as chicken goes. Best chicken I've made as far as I can recall, and I really didn't make any an effort to spice it up. Just salt and pepper and a little italian seasoning, plated with some broccoli, cauliflower and carrots. Took me 15 friggin minutes.

(For those who don't know, brining is soaking in a salt solution. It pulls water and flavor into the meat, as I understand it. I soaked 3 boneless, skinless breasts for an hour in 4 cups of water with 3 tbsp of salt.)

I'm definitely trying this again...

Inspector
09-09-2009, 02:12 PM
Hmmm.....I wonder if this method of making something taste better would work with other types of meat.

Or organs.

Or a body part?

(Honey, bring me a glass of water and the salt shaker......)

MahiMike
09-09-2009, 02:12 PM
I thought brining was an overnight process? Aren't you basically marinating in salt?

keg in kc
09-09-2009, 02:13 PM
Hmmm.....I wonder if this method of making something taste better would work with other types of meat.

Or organs.

Or a body part?

(Honey, bring me a glass of water and the salt shaker......)I don't think you need a glass. Make yourself look good. Use a shotglass. And hope you don't lose it in that ocean of brine. Tiny.

DumbHillbillies
09-09-2009, 02:14 PM
Brined some chicken for lunch. Holy cow. Moist and juicy goodness.

I probably shouldn't say holy cow since it was fowl. Anyway, I'm trying to eat a few more of the things I should, and I think this may help me as far as chicken goes. Best chicken I've made as far as I can recall, and I really didn't make any an effort to spice it up. Just salt and pepper and a little italian seasoning, plated with some broccoli, cauliflower and carrots. Took me 15 friggin minutes.

(For those who don't know, brining is soaking in a salt solution. It pulls water and flavor into the meat, as I understand it. I soaked 3 boneless, skinless breasts for an hour in 4 cups of water with 3 tbsp of salt.)

I'm definitely trying this again...

Sorry to ruin it for you but the salt is going to give you high blood pressure.

Frazod
09-09-2009, 02:17 PM
Sorry to ruin it for you but the salt is going to give you high blood pressure.

Meh. They've got pills for that.

keg in kc
09-09-2009, 02:17 PM
I thought brining was an overnight process? Aren't you basically marinating in salt?I haven't done a whole lot of research into it, but I think it has to do with the type and amount of meat you're brining. I was only doing about a pound. Whole chicken I think would need to brine longer, and something as big as a turkey is I think several hours to overnight.

I think marinating is an entirely different process, but I'm not exactly a culinary expert.

keg in kc
09-09-2009, 02:22 PM
Sorry to ruin it for you but the salt is going to give you high blood pressure.I don't drink, I don't smoke, I'm steadily losing weight thanks to eating more fruits and vegetables and I exercise regularly, so I don't think 3 tablespoons of salt in a quart of water, most of which ends up down the drain, is going to kill me. Although I appreciate the concern and admit I could certainly be wrong.

Inspector
09-09-2009, 02:24 PM
I don't think you need a glass. Make yourself look good. Use a shotglass. And hope you don't lose it in that ocean of brine. Tiny.

I have a thimble ready to go...:D

penguinz
09-09-2009, 02:29 PM
Sorry to ruin it for you but the salt is going to give you high blood pressure.Wrong. High sodium diets to not cause HBP.

DumbHillbillies
09-09-2009, 02:35 PM
Wrong. High sodium diets to not cause HBP.

Funny

DrRyan
09-09-2009, 02:44 PM
I haven't done a whole lot of research into it, but I think it has to do with the type and amount of meat you're brining. I was only doing about a pound. Whole chicken I think would need to brine longer, and something as big as a turkey is I think several hours to overnight.

I think marinating is an entirely different process, but I'm not exactly a culinary expert.

Marinating is a different process. All brining does is put more water/liquid into the meat. When I do whole chickens or turkeys I typically brine them over night. I would not worry much about the salt, all it is doing really is creating a osmotic solution which draws the water into the bird, making it more juicy.

If you do not brine your Thanksgiving turkey, I would highly recommend doing so.

penguinz
09-09-2009, 02:46 PM
FunnyNot really. High sodium diet by itself is not a cause of HBP.

Bowser
09-09-2009, 02:54 PM
Somebody once tried to convince me that salt is actually poison in our systems. I replied with that is the tastiest poison I've ever tried.

DumbHillbillies
09-09-2009, 03:25 PM
Not really. High sodium diet by itself is not a cause of HBP.

Maybe but how many of these causal factors do you have ? I have four and I suspect that most americans have at least several. But, I didn't know that keg in kc lead such a healthy lifestyle (although it sounds like he is overweight since he is trying to lose weight).

What Causes High Blood Pressure?
The exact causes of high blood pressure are not known. Several factors and conditions may play a role in its development, including:

Smoking
Being overweight or obese
Lack of physical activity
Too much salt in the diet
Too much alcohol consumption (more than 1 to 2 drinks per day)
Stress
Older age
Genetics
Family history of high blood pressure
Chronic kidney disease
Adrenal and thyroid disorders

Source: Web Md
http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/blood-pressure-causes

Spicy McHaggis
09-09-2009, 03:30 PM
Speaking of brining, I used this recipe over the summer for a tailgate. People loved it and if I can do it, you certainly can.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/pulled-pork-recipe/index.html

sedated
09-09-2009, 03:32 PM
I thought brining was an overnight process?

I read that it only requires 2 hours per pound of meat.

keg in kc
09-09-2009, 03:34 PM
Maybe but how many of these causal factors do you have ? I have four and I suspect that most americans have at least several. But, I didn't know that keg in kc lead such a healthy lifestyle (although it sounds like he is overweight since he is trying to lose weight).I am overweight. Down about 25 pounds for the year. Right around 220 (I'm 6'0). I'm very active, but I like to eat all the wrong things. Sugar, bread, fried foods. Yum.

I also have genetics/family history against me.

But that's it on that list for me.

Part of the reason for experimenting with new cooking methods is to keep myself eating the right things, like chicken, instead of going out. And I believe DrRyan was correct in that the method is not about seasoning, it's about bringing moisture into the meat. Brine isn't for flavoring, like when you marinade. In fact, the chicken wasn't the least bit salty.

acesn8s
09-09-2009, 03:39 PM
Somebody once tried to convince me that salt is actually poison in our systems. I replied with that is the tastiest poison I've ever tried.Ever had antifreeze?

penguinz
09-09-2009, 03:40 PM
Too much salt is often accompanied by not enough potassium which may be a bigger contributor to HBP.

BigMeatballDave
09-09-2009, 03:49 PM
I was gonna say masturbating with the other hand, but this is good too...

DumbHillbillies
09-09-2009, 03:52 PM
Ever had antifreeze?

Yes, sweet isn't it. :BLVD:

keg in kc
09-09-2009, 03:52 PM
I was gonna say masturbatiing with the other hand, but this is good too...So many options. Do I go with "I'm ambidextrous, lots of practice" or "mine takes two hands".

acesn8s
09-09-2009, 03:53 PM
Yes, sweet isn't it. :BLVD:Drink of choice by Chiefs fans everywhere.

googlegoogle
09-09-2009, 04:07 PM
Gourmet magazine we have says to do this too.

Haven't tried it.

thank for the reminder.

allen_kcCard
09-09-2009, 04:13 PM
I love brining...I had a brined turkey, pork chops, and chicken lots of times.

I'm in the midst of p90x, so I have been trying to avoud the brining to avoud the extra sodium, but I think that nutrition info on brined recipies grossly overcounts the sodium in the finished product because it counts all the salt int he bring as part of the food. I know some extra sodium goes in, but I think that I would probably use less int he long run if I don't need salt on the meat to make it more edible at the end.

I'm starting to struggle a little keeping up with the p90x diet, so I might need to get back to more brining to keep the fire going, so to speak, and reading today makes it wounds like the sodium it does add isn't very bad really....one I saw said it adds about 1/8th a teaspoon to a serving of chicken, which takes in more than other meats since the fibers are so much looser than other meats.

Mr. Krab
09-09-2009, 04:16 PM
Too much salt is often accompanied by not enough potassium which may be a bigger contributor to HBP.
Bananas FTW!!!!!!!!!!!

DumbHillbillies
09-09-2009, 06:30 PM
Marinating is a different process. All brining does is put more water/liquid into the meat. When I do whole chickens or turkeys I typically brine them over night. I would not worry much about the salt, all it is doing really is creating a osmotic solution which draws the water into the bird, making it more juicy.

If you do not brine your Thanksgiving turkey, I would highly recommend doing so.

Wait a minute just occured to me that this doesn't make sense at least to me. The salt/water is hyperosmolar so water would be moving out of the chicken if this worked by osmolar forces. Still not convinced that meat prepared this way does not have a significant amount of sodium.

googlegoogle
09-09-2009, 06:42 PM
Wait a minute just occured to me that this doesn't make sense at least to me. The salt/water is hyperosmolar so water would be moving out of the chicken if this worked by osmolar forces. Still not convinced that meat prepared this way does not have a significant amount of sodium.

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/ibb/posts.aspx?postID=281625

bevischief
09-09-2009, 06:49 PM
Antifreeze and salt the best.

googlegoogle
09-09-2009, 06:54 PM
Antifreeze and salt the best.

chlorine and sodium is good too.

BigOlChiefsfan
09-11-2009, 12:44 PM
I always brine turkey, wild ducks, quail and other small game, too. If you're hunting w/a shotgun the brine will often lighten the color of the meat and make it easier to see some of the otherwise 'hidden' shot. You can add a pinch of sugar to the brine if you like.

BigRichard
09-11-2009, 12:57 PM
Did you take it in the can?

Stewie
09-11-2009, 01:05 PM
Did you take it in the can?

How about a can in the can?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41kUZH2IDBL._SS400_.jpg

RJ
09-11-2009, 01:10 PM
I thought brining was an overnight process? Aren't you basically marinating in salt?


Depends on what you're brining. Chicken breasts or thick cut pork chops might only be a couple of hours. A turkey is an overnight deal.

Stewie
09-11-2009, 01:10 PM
Just a heads up for those who think they'll brine a chicken or turkey. Only brine fresh poultry. The frozen $0.59/lb. turkey isn't meant to be brined. It already has a salt solution. Just read the label to see if there's added solution in the bird (chicken or turkey).

Edit: Another point. Don't use salt by volume but by weight. Table salt is denser than Kosher salt. Use Kosher salt if possible.

RJ
09-11-2009, 01:12 PM
Wait a minute just occured to me that this doesn't make sense at least to me. The salt/water is hyperosmolar so water would be moving out of the chicken if this worked by osmolar forces. Still not convinced that meat prepared this way does not have a significant amount of sodium.



I don't believe it's any saltier than it would be from normal seasoning.

Great Expectations
09-11-2009, 03:07 PM
Also, use a jaccard knife when cooking chicken breasts. It helps the brine enter the meat, but more importantly it helps the chicken cook faster to prevent it from drying out.

A jaccard knife also works well on pork.

BigOlChiefsfan
11-17-2009, 11:19 AM
Have fun!

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Grilled-Turkey