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DaFace
09-20-2009, 07:07 PM
I have a female relative whose significant other is...well...frankly, he's a bit of a douchebag. Until about two years ago, they only had one car between the two of them, but that didn't matter too much since he didn't have a license. However, the situation was making it pretty difficult for him to find a job, so when we upgraded my wife's car, we gave them her old one (which was old, but worked decently). The idea was that he would get his license and then drive the car back and forth to work. This was about 2 years ago.

Fast forward to today. For reasons I cannot comprehend, he still hasn't ever gotten his license (hasn't even tried), and my wife's car hasn't moved in over a year. Even so, he has been driving their OTHER car to work here and there (without a license).

I'm staying way out of the situation, so this isn't an "advice" thread. I have no intentions of telling them how to live their lives. However, I'm curious...


What happens if an unlicensed driver gets in an accident from an insurance standpoint? In other words, say one day he goes out and wrecks the car. Would insurance cover that, given that she has knowingly allowed an unqualified driver to operate the car? What if the situation was much more dire, and he was the cause of an injury accident? Will insurance still cover liability in that situation?

I guess, if I were an insurance company, a basis for the "contract" would be that you don't allow unqualified individuals to operate your car. However, I've never heard of anything like that either.

kstater
09-20-2009, 07:10 PM
You pay for uninsured/underinsured motorist accidents. Mine's even itemized on my bill.

DaFace
09-20-2009, 07:11 PM
You pay for uninsured/underinsured motorist accidents. Mine's even itemized on my bill.

I always thought that was for when YOUR car was hit by an uninsured driver. Would that still apply if your own car was the issue?

kstater
09-20-2009, 07:13 PM
I always thought that was for when YOUR car was hit by an uninsured driver. Would that still apply if your own car was the issue?

The two insurance companies would go to court over it(or settle).

Buehler445
09-20-2009, 07:14 PM
I got hit by an uninsured driver once. My only recourse was to seek small claims damages. I imagine if I was injured my insurance would have paid for it. (I only had liability and the damage was quoted at about 1500). Cops told me they have to send every ticket they give to the DOT and they would issue her a citation for driving without insurance.

I should mention that in this case, she had the card, but didn't pay her premium.

Sandyskc
09-20-2009, 07:21 PM
If you let an unlicensed driver drive your car, the insurance company does not have to pay, and the owner of the car is still liable, so SHE would be responsible for paying any damages.

Bacon Cheeseburger
09-20-2009, 07:24 PM
You pay for uninsured/underinsured motorist accidents. Mine's even itemized on my bill.
I believe that only covers medical bills, not damage to your vehicle.

DaFace
09-20-2009, 07:25 PM
If you let an unlicensed driver drive your car, the insurance company does not have to pay, and the owner of the car is still liable, so SHE would be responsible for paying any damages.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking.

sedated
09-20-2009, 07:26 PM
insurance companies are not charities. if they have a way to get out of paying, they won't think twice about it.

Saul Good
09-20-2009, 07:30 PM
In most cases, if you have collision coverage and wreck your car, they will pay regardless of whether or not you have a valid license. I was a claims adjuster as my first job out of college. I don't remember ever even asking about whether or not the driver had a current, valid license. The insurance is on the car, not the driver.

DaFace
09-20-2009, 08:08 PM
In most cases, if you have collision coverage and wreck your car, they will pay regardless of whether or not you have a valid license. I was a claims adjuster as my first job out of college. I don't remember ever even asking about whether or not the driver had a current, valid license. The insurance is on the car, not the driver.

Interesting. I'm surprised that they wouldn't have that as a criterion for the policy. Otherwise, someone could go out and let their 5 year old drive their car and suffer only minimal consequences if their kid caused a serious accident. But I guess it would be tough to police it.

ChiefEd
09-20-2009, 08:10 PM
Just think about the money you could be saving with Geico...

Mr. Flopnuts
09-20-2009, 08:18 PM
If you're driving uninsured and you get in a wreck don't expect anyone's insurance to pay for it. At least not on your behalf. My car was hit in a parking lot by a car that was insured, but the driver was not, my insurance paid. He was on the hook, and the legal owner of the car was on the hook as well.

Demonpenz
09-20-2009, 08:32 PM
the insurance would likely pay for it, but you would get a risk advice set up on your policy which would up your premium and subject you to special investigations if wrecks started to set up. Being licensed is more of a state police matter where insurance pays if someone is at fault, beling licensed doesn't really factor in if someone was at fault or not. The only way i recall insurance not paying is if you have restricted driver on your policy where that person cannot drive your car. This is pretty rare

Demonpenz
09-20-2009, 08:33 PM
i have worked in insurance a billion years and I don't ever remember licensed ever being asked