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tooge
10-26-2009, 01:05 PM
Ok, got the hunting cabin finished this summer and want to put a wood burning stove in. I havn't ever installed one and I'm not sure what rules to follow with regards to pipe length, double pipe vs stove pipe, distance from the wall, etc. The builing is a metal building and the roof is metal also. It sits on a concrete slab. Any help would be nice. Thanks.

seclark
10-26-2009, 01:06 PM
i bet mohillbilly can help you out.
sec

Buehler445
10-26-2009, 01:06 PM
Don't the regulations vary by city?
Posted via Mobile Device

allen_kcCard
10-26-2009, 01:12 PM
Ok, got the hunting cabin finished this summer and want to put a wood burning stove in. I havn't ever installed one and I'm not sure what rules to follow with regards to pipe length, double pipe vs stove pipe, distance from the wall, etc. The builing is a metal building and the roof is metal also. It sits on a concrete slab. Any help would be nice. Thanks.

Pipe length - Long enough to get outside
double pipe - just don't cross swords..not sure what it has to do with a stove pipe
distance from wall - far enough it doesn't catch it on fire
metal, metal, and contrete - not flammable, yay!

Hope that helps.

tooge
10-26-2009, 01:20 PM
Pipe length - Long enough to get outside
double pipe - just don't cross swords..not sure what it has to do with a stove pipe
distance from wall - far enough it doesn't catch it on fire
metal, metal, and contrete - not flammable, yay!

Hope that helps.

Uh, thanks, er no. I was talking about double insulated pipe. The metal is framed by wood. I hear it has to be high enough for "draft", but dont know how high that is.

MichaelH
10-26-2009, 01:20 PM
There's a lot of things you didn't mention. Is the woodstove connecting to a chimney? If so you need the proper diamter stovepipe to go from the woodstove to the thimble (hole in the side of the chimney). That's all if you have a chimney. If you don't have a chimney, you'll need a double walled interlocking chimney system. Make sure it's for woodstoves and not gas or pellet stoves. It will have to go through your roof. Depending on where it exists the roof will decide how high it needs to be above the roof. It won't draft right if it's too close to the roof. You'll also need a roof boot to seal the chimney pipe where it protrudes through the metal roof.

tooge
10-26-2009, 01:22 PM
There's a lot of things you didn't mention. Is the woodstove connecting to a chimney? If so you need the proper diamter stovepipe to go from the woodstove to the thimble (hole in the side of the chimney). That's all if you have a chimney. If you don't have a chimney, you'll need a double walled interlocking chimney system. Make sure it's for woodstoves and not gas or pellet stoves. It will have to go through your roof. Depending on where it exists the roof will decide how high it needs to be above the roof. It won't draft right if it's too close to the roof. You'll also need a roof boot to seal the chimney pipe where it protrudes through the metal roof.

No chimney. Thanks for the info. Can it go out the side and up instead of up through the roof?

MichaelH
10-26-2009, 01:23 PM
http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/installing_a_woodstove#chimney

Type #1 would be common in any single story construction. Regular black stove pipe is run upwards from the stove and connects with the Insulated Chimney at a special support box located immediately below the ceiling level. Insulated chimney is then stacked up until the required height is obtained. All chimneys must extend a minimum of 3 feet above the roof surface and 2 feet higher than any part of the building within 10 feet.

MOhillbilly
10-26-2009, 01:23 PM
Is it a polebarn type building?

if it has flammable materials on the inside i think you have to clear 18-24 in from the wall. outside, flue i believe is 4ft. dont quote me. but i think thats right.

If you truely have a straight metal building you can do whatever you want really.

MichaelH
10-26-2009, 01:25 PM
No chimney. Thanks for the info. Can it go out the side and up instead of up through the roof?

You could use figure #2 then from the link in the previous post.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 01:41 PM
a few thoughts off the top of my head.
since it's a "hunting cabin" I'm guessing it's out in the sticks somewhere so screw any "local regulations".

not knowing how big the area to heat is, you probably don't need or want a high dollar stove. Lowes, Sutherlands or Home Depot will probably fix you up for about $300.00 or a little less. you probably DO NOT want to leave it unattended year 'round or you won't have it long in the sticks. get one small enough you and a buddy or two can pull it out and take it back home after season.

air tight are better stoves but not really needed for your use.

I prefer stoves that pipe out the top, not the back. but that's just a personal preference. they seem to draw better. IMO

I prefer rolled steel over cast iron. cast has been known to crack if they get too hot. and the welds sometimes cause problems.

I'd use standard single wall pipe and just plan to replace it every couple of years or so.

keep it about 18-24" from anything that will get hot and maybe catch fire.

they make a "slip joint" section of pipe that will allow you to remove/install the pipe. or you could cheap out and set the legs on bricks giving you about 3" of play on the pipe length.

they make a metal flange for going thru a metal roof and get some GOOD quality high temp caulk. pipe should extend at least 3' above the peak of the roof to draw smoke good. get a cap for the top too.

get the right size flu brush and clean at least once a year depending on how often you use it and how dry/green the wood is.

keep a METAL 5 gallon bucket for cleaning the ashes out, fire place poker and shovel.

beer carton cardboard makes good kindling. ;) screw bic lighters and newspaper, plan on using a propane torch for starting fires.

pay attention how the joints match up on the pipe, there is an "upside down" to that stuff.

know what kind of wood you put in it. it DOES make a big difference.

since you had to ask this question to start with, I'd also suggest a good quality fire extinguisher. ;)

I'll let all the pros tell me how full of crap I am now.

penguinz
10-26-2009, 01:45 PM
a few thoughts off the top of my head.
since it's a "hunting cabin" I'm guessing it's out in the sticks somewhere so screw any "local regulations".

not knowing how big the area to heat is, you probably don't need or want a high dollar stove. Lowes, Sutherlands or Home Depot will probably fix you up for about $300.00 or a little less. you probably DO NOT want to leave it unattended year 'round or you won't have it long in the sticks. get one small enough you and a buddy or two can pull it out and take it back home after season.

air tight are better stoves but not really needed for your use.

I prefer stoves that pipe out the top, not the back. but that's just a personal preference. they seem to draw better. IMO

I prefer rolled steel over cast iron. cast has been known to crack if they get too hot. and the welds sometimes cause problems.

I'd use standard single wall pipe and just plan to replace it every couple of years or so.

keep it about 18-24" from anything that will get hot and maybe catch fire.

they make a "slip joint" section of pipe that will allow you to remove/install the pipe. or you could cheap out and set the legs on bricks giving you about 3" of play on the pipe length.

they make a metal flange for going thru a metal roof and get some GOOD quality high temp caulk. pipe should extend at least 3' above the peak of the roof to draw smoke good. get a cap for the top too.

get the right size flu brush and clean at least once a year depending on how often you use it and how dry/green the wood is.

keep a METAL 5 gallon bucket for cleaning the ashes out, fire place poker and shovel.

beer carton cardboard makes good kindling. ;) screw bic lighters and newspaper, plan on using a propane torch for starting fires.

pay attention how the joints match up on the pipe, there is an "upside down" to that stuff.

know what kind of wood you put in it. it DOES make a big difference.

since you had to ask this question to start with, I'd also suggest a good quality fire extinguisher. ;)

I'll let all the pros tell me how full of crap I am now.A plastic bucket will work just fine. Save your money.

Inspector
10-26-2009, 02:05 PM
Get one that comes with a fire extinquisher.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 02:14 PM
I just have a "thing" about hot embers in a plastic bucket. call me silly.

lots of stuff comes in metal buckets you can get from a dumpster. I've never in my life paid for a metal bucket, just for the bucket.

tooge
10-26-2009, 02:46 PM
a few thoughts off the top of my head.
since it's a "hunting cabin" I'm guessing it's out in the sticks somewhere so screw any "local regulations".

not knowing how big the area to heat is, you probably don't need or want a high dollar stove. Lowes, Sutherlands or Home Depot will probably fix you up for about $300.00 or a little less. you probably DO NOT want to leave it unattended year 'round or you won't have it long in the sticks. get one small enough you and a buddy or two can pull it out and take it back home after season.

air tight are better stoves but not really needed for your use.

I prefer stoves that pipe out the top, not the back. but that's just a personal preference. they seem to draw better. IMO

I prefer rolled steel over cast iron. cast has been known to crack if they get too hot. and the welds sometimes cause problems.

I'd use standard single wall pipe and just plan to replace it every couple of years or so.

keep it about 18-24" from anything that will get hot and maybe catch fire.

they make a "slip joint" section of pipe that will allow you to remove/install the pipe. or you could cheap out and set the legs on bricks giving you about 3" of play on the pipe length.

they make a metal flange for going thru a metal roof and get some GOOD quality high temp caulk. pipe should extend at least 3' above the peak of the roof to draw smoke good. get a cap for the top too.

get the right size flu brush and clean at least once a year depending on how often you use it and how dry/green the wood is.

keep a METAL 5 gallon bucket for cleaning the ashes out, fire place poker and shovel.

beer carton cardboard makes good kindling. ;) screw bic lighters and newspaper, plan on using a propane torch for starting fires.

pay attention how the joints match up on the pipe, there is an "upside down" to that stuff.

know what kind of wood you put in it. it DOES make a big difference.

since you had to ask this question to start with, I'd also suggest a good quality fire extinguisher. ;)

I'll let all the pros tell me how full of crap I am now.

That is sort of what I was thinking until I started looking online for the pipe. Most sites talk all about double insulated pipe and chimney kits. Going by "the book" would set me back close to a thousand bucks. Screw that, that buys alot of blankets and whiskey. I think I will take the less expensive route.

MOhillbilly
10-26-2009, 03:50 PM
That is sort of what I was thinking until I started looking online for the pipe. Most sites talk all about double insulated pipe and chimney kits. Going by "the book" would set me back close to a thousand bucks. Screw that, that buys alot of blankets and whiskey. I think I will take the less expensive route.

shouldnt be more than 300$, even going by the book. call around to some chimney sweep repair places.

penguinz
10-26-2009, 03:58 PM
I just have a "thing" about hot embers in a plastic bucket. call me silly.

lots of stuff comes in metal buckets you can get from a dumpster. I've never in my life paid for a metal bucket, just for the bucket.It was a joke.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 06:09 PM
oops, sorry, my bad.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 06:15 PM
shouldnt be more than 300$, even going by the book. call around to some chimney sweep repair places.

that craps expensive. I've got my receipts for some stuff I bought about 3 years ago.
I'll dig it out while I watch the game later and post what I paid.

ETA:

5.8.07 I bought a "turnkey" set up from a place in Olathe. being off season and hungry all the pipe stuff was 20% off plus another 5% off for paying cold hard cash.
two 4' sections of double wall insulated stainless was $295.00

haven't priced any since then but I doubt it's any cheaper, but maybe if you look hard on the net you can find a deal.

Hog Farmer
10-26-2009, 06:46 PM
Sparkys got some good points but you can really save yourself a lot of money and trouble with a few good pointers.

1) PVC is way cheaper than metal and will make you a fine stove pipe. Just remember to use lots of glue at the joints.

2) To get it to draw right the cap needs to be at least 14 feet above the roof line. This way it really gets going and since you'll be adding two 90 degree elbows at the top to keep the rain out, it's totally necessary.

3) Trying to get the fire lit is always the hardest part so using a hand torch is a good idea. Also keep handy a little mixture of diesel fuel, black powder and PVC glue. Mix it up into 1 gallon milk jugs and just set one in the chamber and throw a lit roll of toilet paper in there.

4) The distance from the wall really doesn't matter . Thats a wives tale. The closer to the wall the better IMO because it gives you more room.

5)If you go ahead and make the flu out of PVC like I suggest then you'll want to pour about a gallon of PVC cleaner down it a couple times a year.

6) Treated wood from a lumber yard burns longer than regular wood. I used the neighbors fence posts until they were all gone.

7) Fire extinguishers are for people too stuped to carry insurance.

8) It is true that it could be stolen when you leave for some time so I would recommend filling it full of concrete mix when your done for the winter. It'll be too heavy to steal.

I hope this helps. Good luck.

Skip Towne
10-26-2009, 06:52 PM
I like to keep a small bellows handy. It will help revive a fire that is trying to go out.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 07:36 PM
I like to keep a small bellows handy. It will help revive a fire that is trying to go out.

or knee pads for the camp whore. those are a "multi-purpose" tool.

seriously, I would like to have a small bellows but never remember to look at the local hardware store or wally world.

and LOL,
PVC glue left over from the pipe installation will help save on the liquor bill too. a little dab'll do ya. make ya cough balloons.

Bugeater
10-26-2009, 08:37 PM
Heck if the building is all metal I'd just run stove pipe all the way to the top, that double walled shit is expensive. I think I spent around $500 total on mine back in '04, but I had to buy 5 4' sections, plus the tee, thimble and cap. And yes, you can run it out through the wall then up the outside, I did that on mine and even added two 90s on the inside to drop it down to the level of the stove without any problems, fugger is worth it's weight in gold.

sparkky
10-26-2009, 08:44 PM
No chimney. Thanks for the info. Can it go out the side and up instead of up through the roof?

ya, you can but I don't think they draw as well. the fewer the bends in the pipe the better for the draw.

and you'll want to put a damper in the pipe 2' or so above the stove so you can slow down the burn rate once it's going if the stove isn't an airtight type.

MOhillbilly
10-27-2009, 07:28 AM
that craps expensive. I've got my receipts for some stuff I bought about 3 years ago.
I'll dig it out while I watch the game later and post what I paid.

ETA:

5.8.07 I bought a "turnkey" set up from a place in Olathe. being off season and hungry all the pipe stuff was 20% off plus another 5% off for paying cold hard cash.
two 4' sections of double wall insulated stainless was $295.00

haven't priced any since then but I doubt it's any cheaper, but maybe if you look hard on the net you can find a deal.

for what he needs he can get a up to code set up for around 300$. i know how much the stuff runs trust me.

sparkky
10-27-2009, 07:51 AM
MO,,

fair enough. I will defer to your opinion sir.
I'm sure you're more informed and up to date on this stuff than I am. :thumb:

are you in that business?

Bugeater
10-27-2009, 07:59 AM
for what he needs he can get a up to code set up for around 300$. i know how much the stuff runs trust me.
What I found out when I did mine is that the prices vary wildly. I went to a fireplace specialty store and the stuff was outrageous, Menards had the double walled pipe for about 1/2 the price but they didn't have everything else I needed, then trying to make the shit from two different places fit together was a pain in the ass.

MOhillbilly
10-27-2009, 08:24 AM
MO,,

fair enough. I will defer to your opinion sir.
I'm sure you're more informed and up to date on this stuff than I am. :thumb:

are you in that business?

no, but ive done my homework and like bugeater says prices vary. If you have even basic horse trader skills you can get a class c flue and stove pipe for around 300$.


Sparkky- if you are in N. AR consumers hardware on n. glenstone in spfld is your friend. great prices.

People in spfld. they will fix your broken storm windows & screens.
I also get decent deals from smittys chimney on w. chestnut and of course the almighty NORTHERNTOOL.COM has great deals on stoves.

tooge
10-27-2009, 08:26 AM
Sparkys got some good points but you can really save yourself a lot of money and trouble with a few good pointers.

1) PVC is way cheaper than metal and will make you a fine stove pipe. Just remember to use lots of glue at the joints.

2) To get it to draw right the cap needs to be at least 14 feet above the roof line. This way it really gets going and since you'll be adding two 90 degree elbows at the top to keep the rain out, it's totally necessary.

3) Trying to get the fire lit is always the hardest part so using a hand torch is a good idea. Also keep handy a little mixture of diesel fuel, black powder and PVC glue. Mix it up into 1 gallon milk jugs and just set one in the chamber and throw a lit roll of toilet paper in there.

4) The distance from the wall really doesn't matter . Thats a wives tale. The closer to the wall the better IMO because it gives you more room.

5)If you go ahead and make the flu out of PVC like I suggest then you'll want to pour about a gallon of PVC cleaner down it a couple times a year.

6) Treated wood from a lumber yard burns longer than regular wood. I used the neighbors fence posts until they were all gone.

7) Fire extinguishers are for people too stuped to carry insurance.

8) It is true that it could be stolen when you leave for some time so I would recommend filling it full of concrete mix when your done for the winter. It'll be too heavy to steal.

I hope this helps. Good luck.

Best advice yet. I'm foloowing this to a tee. Thanks

sparkky
10-27-2009, 08:50 AM
MOh,

thanks for the tip. I'm dead center between Harrison and Mt. Home so that puts Springfield about 2 hours away.
so far I haven't encountered anything that can't be dealt with in one or the other. I still go back to KC to work on occasion so I make a list of "GET" things while I'm up there.

one BIG bummer here is UPS/FED X flat out REFUSE and laugh at me about coming down my road. that makes "net shopping" a PIA finding a place to ship stuff to. for several reasons DW and I both are touchy about involving friends in our personal affairs.

if you were in the biz,, I was going to ask your opinion on the Regency brand of stoves. and please feel free to counter any "bad advice" you think I may given about stoves. I will gladly defer.

thanks again for the Spgfd. tips.

Delano
10-27-2009, 09:06 AM
Is there a tax break for wood burning stoves?

MOhillbilly
10-27-2009, 10:00 AM
MOh,

thanks for the tip. I'm dead center between Harrison and Mt. Home so that puts Springfield about 2 hours away.
so far I haven't encountered anything that can't be dealt with in one or the other. I still go back to KC to work on occasion so I make a list of "GET" things while I'm up there.

one BIG bummer here is UPS/FED X flat out REFUSE and laugh at me about coming down my road. that makes "net shopping" a PIA finding a place to ship stuff to. for several reasons DW and I both are touchy about involving friends in our personal affairs.

if you were in the biz,, I was going to ask your opinion on the Regency brand of stoves. and please feel free to counter any "bad advice" you think I may given about stoves. I will gladly defer.

thanks again for the Spgfd. tips.

not in the biz, but put a new stove,stainless chimney liner, ect. in last year and did my homework. I bought a vogelzang stove(heartwood) and attached a heat reclaimer. When i bought my stove i priced the ones i wanted at every place in the area and they all said they couldnt touch NT.com prices.

If you work in town or off a state hwy ect UPS/FED X will dropship to any addy you want,friends,family,ect.(part of my job is shippin & rec.) if you can ship to a buis. itll be cheaper then a residence.

Consumers hardware in spfld has chimney kits for around 175$, i didnt put one in but they are slick, and easy to install.

MOhillbilly
10-27-2009, 10:01 AM
Is there a tax break for wood burning stoves?

yes, but it has to meet certain EPA regulations.