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Saul Good
11-18-2009, 06:04 PM
http://realestate.yahoo.com/promo/americas-best-place-to-raise-your-kids.html

See which town ranked highest in BusinessWeek's fourth annual survey of the Best Places to Raise Your Kids. Hint: It's in Illinois.

You'd think that the character of a village that grew from 12,000 to 60,000 residents in less than 40 years might have changed with the population. But young families move into Tinley Park, Ill., a proud village 25 miles southwest of Chicago, for the same reason that Edward and Emily Zabrocki chose to raise their children there in 1970.

"We looked at the schools and the community services," said Zabrocki, a retired high school guidance counselor who has been Tinley Park's mayor since 1981. "And we found a house that was good for our pocketbook."

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Tinley Park, with its top-rated schools, low crime, beautiful parks, relatively affordable houses, and easy access to jobs, is the winner of BusinessWeek's Best Places in America to Raise Kids. Working with OnBoard Informatics, we chose a winner for each state, but the Chicago suburb-only an hour south of last year's winner, Mount Prospect, Ill.-scored the highest.

Named after the village's first railroad master in the 1800s, Tinley Park has two train stations, which carry commuters to Chicago in 45 minutes. Single-family homes for sale in Tinley Park start at $166,000 for a two-bedroom, two-bath house spread over 1,200 square feet to brand-new four-bedroom house for $630,000.
Settling Down
All three of the main high schools serving Tinley Park are ranked in the top 100 in the state. And the students are closely tied to the community and often stay there after graduating.

At Andrew High School, where each student is required to complete 24 hours of community service to graduate, only about 3% of the 2,400 student body move away during high school, compared with the state average of 14%, said principal Robert Nolting.

"There are a high number of kids in Tinley Park who have lived there their whole life," Nolting said. "Of the communities I've lived in or have been part of, it has more interconnectedness to it. It feels smaller than it is."

The village is quiet and safe. But it was shaken on Feb. 2, 2008, when a man posing as a delivery man shot five women to death at a clothing store in one of Tinley Park's outdoor malls. It was a big shock but it brought the community even closer, said Tinley Park High School Principal Theresa Zielinski.

"It shocked everybody," said Zielinski, a lifelong resident. "It's not what happens here in our town."
Friendly Atmosphere
Safety, along with school test scores, air quality, and affordability, were weighted especially highly in this year's calculations. But we also considered job growth, diversity, and amenities such as museums, parks, and theaters.

Many of our picks also share Tinley Park's family-friendly atmosphere. Owensboro, our top pick for Kentucky, is a good example. The industrial town, about 100 miles southwest of Louisville known for its mutton barbecue and as the birthplace of actor Johnny Depp, takes pride in its school district and hires accordingly, said Keith Lawrence, business reporter for the Messenger-Inquirer newspaper in Owensboro. The town's former superintendent left to become superintendent of the Lexington school district.The median home is about $100,000, and it's so safe that two middle-aged women once set out to walk every mile of the 18.7-square-mile city. "They started walking after getting off work at 10 p.m., Lawrence said. "There aren't a whole lot of cities you would do that."

"It's kind of a 21st century version of Leave It to Beaver-church and family and Little League and soccer," said Lawrence who raised a family in Owensboro. "It's really family-oriented. If you're single, though, it's rough."

Saul Good
11-18-2009, 06:20 PM
7 of the 10 cities had 2.5% black populations or less. All of them are in Blue States.
The other 3 cities are all in red states.

Incidentally, has anyone ever been to Warner Robins, GA? It's over 32% black and ranks third on the list.

I started digging a bit to see what some of the more successful cities in the US with disproportionately high black populations, and Atlanta, GA jumped out at me. I've been to Atlanta, and it seems like a pretty cool city. 56% of its citizens are black. What really surprised me, though, is the fact that it has the third highest GLBT percentage of any major US city.

Overall, I found it interesting that the most successful towns with high minority populations were all in red states. Is that totally random, or is there something more to it?

NewChief
11-18-2009, 06:28 PM
7 of the 10 cities had 2.5% black populations or less. All of them are in Blue States.
The other 3 cities are all in red states.

Incidentally, has anyone ever been to Warner Robins, GA? It's over 32% black and ranks third on the list.

I started digging a bit to see what some of the more successful cities in the US with disproportionately high black populations, and Atlanta, GA jumped out at me. I've been to Atlanta, and it seems like a pretty cool city. 56% of its citizens are black. What really surprised me, though, is the fact that it has the third highest GLBT percentage of any major US city.

Overall, I found it interesting that the most successful towns with high minority populations were all in red states. Is that totally random, or is there something more to it?

Atlanta is cool as hell because of that, in my opinion. I always loved watching the Flip This House shows in Atlanta, because it was all these brothers that were serious fucking businessmen and were surrounded with other brothers and sisters who were serious businesspeople. It's not like I lived in some illusion that there were no black business people, but it was just such a different depiction that what we're accustomed to seeing on television.

Little Rock is also similar with that demographic if you hang out downtown.

Saul Good
11-18-2009, 06:35 PM
Atlanta is cool as hell because of that, in my opinion. I always loved watching the Flip This House shows in Atlanta, because it was all these brothers that were serious ****ing businessmen and were surrounded with other brothers and sisters who were serious businesspeople. It's not like I lived in some illusion that there were no black business people, but it was just such a different depiction that what we're accustomed to seeing on television.

I know exactly what you mean. I've watched that show and thought the same thing. I don't know why, but when I see a black person in that situation, I root extra hard for him/her. Maybe it's similar to the way I root for white guys in basketball.

WilliamTheIrish
11-18-2009, 06:44 PM
Atlanta is cool as hell because of that, in my opinion. I always loved watching the Flip This House shows in Atlanta, because it was all these brothers that were serious ****ing businessmen and were surrounded with other brothers and sisters who were serious businesspeople. It's not like I lived in some illusion that there were no black business people, but it was just such a different depiction that what we're accustomed to seeing on television.

Little Rock is also similar with that demographic if you hang out downtown.

I spent a very short time in Atlanta over the summer. It made me realize just how "small town" I am. I'd never been to the South. But Atlanta was just an eye popper for me.

Try to understand where I'm coming from when I tell this story.

I stayed at a fairly new development 10 minutes from the airport. I have never seen so many black folks. Ever. And these folks were driving big trucks, F-350's and Lexus' and Mercedes and Acuras. All these folks had to be business owners. Successful business owners and professionals. The homes in the area were in the 250k and up range. Driving through the neighborhood, there wasn't a single white face. I'd never experienced that in my life. Here, I can't even tell you the name of a large black owned business.

And it was the friendliest vacation experience of my life. True southern hospitality. During the time I was in the area, I don't think I saw 25 white folks. It was the strangest and most enlightening experience of my life.

Something very different for a guy from flyover country.

Saul Good
11-18-2009, 06:59 PM
I spent a very short time in Atlanta over the summer. It made me realize just how "small town" I am. I'd never been to the South. But Atlanta was just an eye popper for me.

Try to understand where I'm coming from when I tell this story.

I stayed at a fairly new development 10 minutes from the airport. I have never seen so many black folks. Ever. And these folks were driving big trucks, F-350's and Lexus' and Mercedes and Acuras. All these folks had to be business owners. Successful business owners and professionals. The homes in the area were in the 250k and up range. Driving through the neighborhood, there wasn't a single white face. I'd never experienced that in my life. Here, I can't even tell you the name of a large black owned business.

And it was the friendliest vacation experience of my life. True southern hospitality. During the time I was in the area, I don't think I saw 25 white folks. It was the strangest and most enlightening experience of my life.

Something very different for a guy from flyover country.

I would love to see what the black illegitimacy rate is in Atlanta, but I can't find it. Nationwide, it's around 70%. I would wager that it is substantially lower in Atlanta.

Rain Man
11-18-2009, 09:05 PM
I have a really bad image of Illinois, but it's because I had a bad life experience there. I could never live in Illinois.

Saul Good
11-18-2009, 09:08 PM
I have a really bad image of Illinois, but it's because I had a bad life experience there. I could never live in Illinois.

Where did Dongola rank for best Sudanese cities for raising children?

NewChief
11-18-2009, 09:15 PM
ROFL

They rated Springdale as the best place in Arkansas, and they have a picture of Fayetteville, instead. The fact that they chose Springdale over Fayetteville tells me that these people know jack and shit about.... anything. Good grief.

Rain Man
11-18-2009, 09:16 PM
Where did Dongola rank for best Sudanese cities for raising children?

It's actually one of the top ten. Less than half of the schools have been burned by the janjaweed, the land mine concentration is well below average, women are only whipped lightly for wearing pants, and ammunition is remarkably inexpensive.

Saul Good
11-18-2009, 09:18 PM
It's actually one of the top ten. Less than half of the schools have been burned by the janjaweed, the land mine concentration is well below average, women are only whipped lightly for wearing pants, and ammunition is remarkably inexpensive.

I said Dongola, not Detroit.

BIG_DADDY
11-18-2009, 09:43 PM
Um, no thanks.

Hydrae
11-19-2009, 07:34 AM
I said Dongola, not Detroit.

ROFL

RJ
11-19-2009, 10:11 AM
Rio Rancho, New Mexico makes the list. They're right - it is safe and the schools are pretty good. Now if we could just get our own movie theater and a decent sub shop.

RaiderH8r
11-19-2009, 11:00 AM
Curiously, Neverland Ranch made a significant jump up on this list this year.

NewChief
11-19-2009, 01:26 PM
Here's a picture taken today from Springdale, the best place to raise a family in Arkansas:

http://twitpic.com/q4n1w

bowener
11-19-2009, 01:37 PM
Didn't Springfield, Missouri rank as one of the bottom 5 places to raise a family last year? I thought I saw that. When I get some time I will try and find it, unless somebody else gets around to that for me.

Garcia Bronco
11-19-2009, 02:43 PM
Another study has Vriginia Beach, Virginia as the best place to rasie children with Denver coming in at 6th.

CoMoChief
11-19-2009, 04:20 PM
I was born in Peoria, IL til I was 5yrs old. Then my dad got a job promotion in KC so we moved. Peoria's not too far away from there.