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CosmicPal
11-20-2009, 06:56 PM
I could use some feedback from any of the pheasant hunters on the board. It would be greatly appreciated.

1. Can a 12 year-old boy handle a 12 gauge shotgun?
2. If you're taking your 12 year-old son hunting, what are some of the techniques you would teach him?

Much thanks...

cdcox
11-20-2009, 07:02 PM
Depends on the kid if he is ready to handle any fire arm at that age.

If he isn't familiar with firearms, that is a pretty hefty load for someone his size.

Hunting is quite a bit different than target shooting in terms of safe gun handling. He'll be independently responsible for the safe handling of that gun for several hours. Running up and down ditches, crossing barb wire fences.

Hunter safety class before he goes out.

Hog Farmer
11-20-2009, 07:05 PM
I shoot lots of Pheasant.

First of all, yes ,a 12 year old boy should be able to handle a 12 guage unless he's a small 12 year old.

The main thing I would teach him is to watch and learn and tell him when he's getting close to where the bird you just shot fell. Then teach him how to clean the bird.

CosmicPal
11-20-2009, 07:07 PM
Depends on the kid if he is ready to handle any fire arm at that age.


Thanks! :thumb:

So, if a 12 gauge is too powerful, what gauge would you start him off with? And will this gauge be enough to bag a pheasant?

CosmicPal
11-20-2009, 07:10 PM
I shoot lots of Pheasant.

First of all, yes ,a 12 year old boy should be able to handle a 12 guage unless he's a small 12 year old.

The main thing I would teach him is to watch and learn and tell him when he's getting close to where the bird you just shot fell. Then teach him how to clean the bird.

He's a strong, athletic kid, so I guess a 12 gauge will be all right then.

Gonzo
11-20-2009, 07:11 PM
I've been an avid phesant hunter since I was 9. A 12 guage should be ok,(with a lighter load).
Tell him to keep the barrel up, don't put the gun over his shoulder, (douchebags do this) because he won't know where he's aiming. A safety course is wise.
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Hog Farmer
11-20-2009, 07:21 PM
I'm thinking about buying my girl her first rifle next year when she's ten. She tails behind me while I pheasant hunt, but she won't pick one up. She knows to NEVER get in front of me and when I raise to shoot she squats down. I got her a toy pistol last month to start teaching her the basics of like never pointing that thing at anything you don't want dead. She will have to master her toy before she gets the rifle and when she does it will be under close , I mean within an arms length close, supervision before I even let her hold it. And of course I just don't think I'd ever let her touch a handgun until she'd an adult. I've been around firearms all my life and have great respect for them. A kid has GOT to be ready before putting one in their hands.

NewChief
11-20-2009, 07:24 PM
I'm thinking about buying my girl her first rifle next year when she's ten. She tails behind me while I pheasant hunt, but she won't pick one up. She knows to NEVER get in front of me and when I raise to shoot she squats down. I got her a toy pistol last month to start teaching her the basics of like never pointing that thing at anything you don't want dead. She will have to master her toy before she gets the rifle and when she does it will be under close , I mean within an arms length close, supervision before I even let her hold it. And of course I just don't think I'd ever let her touch a handgun until she'd an adult. I've been around firearms all my life and have great respect for them. A kid has GOT to be ready before putting one in their hands.

You going to get her a rifle like a .22 or a shotgun like a .410?

Both great kid guns. Don't know if a .410 could handle pheasant or not, though? (never gotten to hunt pheasant down here, just doves and occasionally quail).

Hog Farmer
11-20-2009, 07:26 PM
You going to get her a rifle like a .22 or a shotgun like a .410?

Both great kid guns. Don't know if a .410 could handle pheasant or not, though? (never gotten to hunt pheasant down here, just doves and occasionally quail).

It'll be a .22

I really don't think she'll be the hunting type so I'll wait before thinking shotgun

I really just want her to know how to handle one because I think everyone should and if she wants to go hunt then great!

NewChief
11-20-2009, 07:31 PM
It'll be a .22

I really don't think she'll be the hunting type so I'll wait before thinking shotgun

I really just want her to know how to handle one because I think everyone should and if she wants to go hunt then great!

Plinking cans/targets with a .22 is a lot of fun and the lack of kick won't turn her off, either. I agree with you on the gun handling. I'm a bleeding heart, but I've had a gun in my hand since I was, literally, around five years old. Ignorance is definitely not bliss when it comes to firearms.

kstater
11-20-2009, 07:33 PM
Be sure to get him out practicing first. I reccomend throwing some 3 1/2s in there and find out what he's made of.

Bwana
11-20-2009, 07:36 PM
I was blasting a 12 gauge at 12, but I had done a lot of shooting before that point in time. If your kid isn't a big kid, and hasn't done much shooting, I would start him out with a 20 gauge. A 12 gauge could beat him up, depending on which shells you're using.

CoMoChief
11-20-2009, 07:58 PM
I could use some feedback from any of the pheasant hunters on the board. It would be greatly appreciated.

1. Can a 12 year-old boy handle a 12 gauge shotgun?
2. If you're taking your 12 year-old son hunting, what are some of the techniques you would teach him?

Much thanks...

Me and my dad have gone to Mitchell, SD since I was like 12-13, so I dont know how much a 1-2 yrs difference would make, but it wasn't also the first time I've been hunting.

Up at my dad's friends place in SD they're EVERYWHERE. Drives the dogs absolutely insane almost to the point where they won't listen or stand on point for very long. Bringing a not-well trained dog to a place like that can give him a major case of ADHD.

Really it all depends where you're going and how many people are there hunting at the same time. Where I go there are a ton of people. So if it's something like that he's gotta be careful and make sure not shooting out of his range or cross firing into other people. Even dumbass adults make this mistake, and I've been "zinged" quite a few times....it's not fun and it will piss other people off, regardless of your age. The place where me and my dad go there are tall weeds, and generally no one wheres orange since most birds see color. So you gotta be careful and on the lookout.

If it's somewhere small and just a few people then I wouldnt nearly worry about it as much. Just depends I guess really how good is he with a gun, is he mature enough to handle/fire one. All parents/dads are different. My dad thought it was important to learn to fire/operate a shotgun and pistol when I was 12-13 yrs old. I got a Browning Gold 12 gauge Semi-automatic gas operated shotgun. Light as a feather. But most 12 yrs old would be able to handle most if not all 12 gauges. Theres VERY little kickback.

http://www.sportsmansreview.com/images/6/ReviewImg/105.jpg

If theres a nearby range....I'd take him there first. Shooting clay pigeons is fun and he will enjoy it.

Johnny Vegas
11-20-2009, 08:13 PM
kids always want to keep their finger on the trigger when pulling up for the shot. Make sure he doesn't do that. lol

MikeMaslowski
11-20-2009, 08:18 PM
I had a .410 when I was 12 (I was kinda tender shouldered though). And, after I killed the pheasant of course, we would cut the feet off and pull the tendons to make them move. My dad was sick, and the coolest mofo that ever lived.

COMO... East river pheasant or west river..which do you prefer? Haha... It's so fun telling people around the world of the SD interstate rivalry based on a river.

jeff h
11-20-2009, 08:39 PM
The place where me and my dad go there are tall weeds, and generally no one wheres orange since most birds see color.

This isn't true with pheasants. They will see you but not because of the color. I have stood in the open and they have adjusted course to miss me. I moved in front of a big round bale and blasted away as the could not see my silhouette.

I hunted opening weekend in South Dakota this year with a friend of mine who didn't wear an orange hat but had an orange vest. I can't remember how many times I lost him and couldn't shoot because I didn't know if he had slipped ahead or behind the line.

From SD state wildlife website..."While itís not required by South Dakota law, it just makes good sense for all upland bird hunters to wear at least one article of fluorescent orange clothing."

cdcox
11-20-2009, 08:41 PM
I can't remember how many times I lost him and couldn't shoot because I didn't know if he had slipped ahead or behind the line.

Wut? /Dick Cheney

jeff h
11-20-2009, 08:46 PM
Wut? /Dick Cheney

While Cheney still pulled the trigger, that guy was an idiot for coming up from behind the group, especially while hunting quail.

2bikemike
11-20-2009, 09:14 PM
I could use some feedback from any of the pheasant hunters on the board. It would be greatly appreciated.

1. Can a 12 year-old boy handle a 12 gauge shotgun?
2. If you're taking your 12 year-old son hunting, what are some of the techniques you would teach him?

Much thanks...

I was a skinny little fugger at 12 and I shot 12 GA. One thing I would suggest is get him out and let him shoot a few times maybe to a trap range. See how he handles the gun. After giving him some shooting lessons watch where he points the barrell make sure he doesn't point it in an unsafe direction.

Iowanian
11-20-2009, 09:51 PM
Start a 12 year old on a youth model 20 GA.

I was started younger than that, using a single shot 20 GA.

Make sure the person teaching him how to use it safely, knows how to shoot safely.

Practice loading and unloading and functioning, then practice stationary targets on the ground(cans)....they move on to clays in a controled environment.

Al Czervik
11-20-2009, 10:03 PM
Start a 12 year old on a youth model 20 GA.

I was started younger than that, using a single shot 20 GA.

Make sure the person teaching him how to use it safely, knows how to shoot safely.

Practice loading and unloading and functioning, then practice stationary targets on the ground(cans)....they move on to clays in a controled environment.

Excellent advice....
And get him in Hunter Safety class...
They are free and gets them in the mode of always thinking safety....

Buehler445
11-21-2009, 06:32 AM
Thanks! :thumb:

So, if a 12 gauge is too powerful, what gauge would you start him off with? And will this gauge be enough to bag a pheasant?

20 gauge. It will, but you have to be a better aim. I strongly recommend some clay pigeons to start.

Pioli Zombie
11-21-2009, 06:40 AM
Have him first practice in shopping malls.
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JD10367
11-21-2009, 06:43 AM
I hunt them sometimes at night, in camo, when I can shoot from the bushes and not get caught by police. A good spot is near a flea market or... oh, wait, I misread the title, I thought it said "Any Peasant Hunters Out There?". Never mind.

Bwana
11-21-2009, 07:58 AM
20 gauge. It will, but you have to be a better aim. I strongly recommend some clay pigeons to start.

Indeed!

When I first stated with a shotgun, my dad made me use a 20 gauge "single shot." Most of the time I only had one shot, so it made me a darn good shot right out of the gate. It pissed me off at the time, but looking back, it was the best thing he could have done for me.

On a side note, the last thing I would get him to start out with is a simi-auto. If his first gun is a simi, he will just point and shoot, rather than aim, knowing there is another shot right there. Once he gets the basic fundamentals down, you can move him up to something like that if you like.

Pioli Zombie
11-21-2009, 09:18 AM
First its pheasants, then its ducks, then bears, the teachersn then police officers, then federal buildings, then flying airlanes into buildings, where does this BLOODY MADNESS STOP!!!!!!?????????
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Pioli Zombie
11-21-2009, 09:19 AM
I'm going to go to Boston Market and shoot me a Rotissiere dinner with two sides.
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Delano
11-21-2009, 11:41 AM
And get him in Hunter Safety class...
They are free and gets them in the mode of always thinking safety....

This.

On a related note, I've talked with SD conservation officers over the past few years and they tell me the pheasant numbers are incredibly high. In fact, in 2008 they considered adding a new season for residents. There is also a lot of fear amongst the GF&P that the numbers will be dropping in the next few years because lots of CRP acres are in the process of conversion back to row crops.

TIED5573
11-21-2009, 12:03 PM
You don't indicate if it's his first time with a gun in the field, if you are hunting in a group or just you two, if you have a dog, what part of the country you plan to hunt. All is relevent, and it will affect how you hunt with him. If you have not hunted wild pheasants before, I would recommend going with some who has and with a good gun dog. Early season birds are different from late season birds, and of course weather conditions play into the experience. The gun size recommendations are all sound, it has more to do with his being able to handle the firearm. You can bring down a pheasant with a .410, but I would recommend at least a 20 ga. I have been involved in Pheasants Forever for many years, they can offer a wealth of info for you and your son. Welcome to pheasant hunting. Good hunting and good luck!

PastorMikH
11-21-2009, 01:30 PM
I could use some feedback from any of the pheasant hunters on the board. It would be greatly appreciated.

1. Can a 12 year-old boy handle a 12 gauge shotgun?
2. If you're taking your 12 year-old son hunting, what are some of the techniques you would teach him?

Much thanks...


1. He should be able to handle one, but I'd make sure the gun fit him - ie not too heavy, stock cut to his size so he can pull it up without hanging up.

2. My grandfather did something with both my dad when he was a kid that my dad did with me when I was a kid. He let dad carry an unloaded gun when they hunted quail. When the dog went on point he would give dad a shell and let him load the gun. Then, after dad proved he could carry the gun safely until grandad was comfortable, he let dad carry the gun unloaded but let him carry his own shells. When the dog went on point, dad could load his gun. Once grandad was comfortable with this, he let dad carry his gun loaded (on safe) like an adult. Like I said, dad also did this with me when I first started out too. It may be a little harder with pheasant but it could still be done.

I'd have the kid walk right with me and not off to the side. I'd also be hesitant to take him in a big group of hunters where walkers and blockers will start shooting at each other (but then again, I'm hesitant when I'M in this situation with hunters I don't know or trust).

PastorMikH
11-21-2009, 01:40 PM
On wearing orange... You should always wear orange! (unless you are tresspassing, then orange should be avoided as most landowners are able to see you tresspassing at long distances).

:)

PastorMikH
11-21-2009, 01:42 PM
He's a strong, athletic kid, so I guess a 12 gauge will be all right then.



I think I'd still avoid heavy 3" mag loads. 2 3/4 field loads with 1 to 1 1/8 oz shot will work fine without hammering his shoulder and causing him to develop a flinch when he pulls a trigger.

Buehler445
11-21-2009, 02:55 PM
On wearing orange... You should always wear orange! (unless you are tresspassing, then orange should be avoided as most landowners are able to see you tresspassing at long distances).

:)

That'd work, but most of the time the toolboxes that are trespassing park their big ass clean (so we know he isn't local) right by the field they are trespassing on.
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