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View Full Version : Obama Not just lil bitty African countries asking for Billions in Copenhagen


HonestChieffan
11-30-2009, 01:16 PM
Somebody needs to tell the UN we are done paying all the bills and for once stand up to these weasels. What are the odds Obama gives in and commits this money adding to the deficit?


Upfront money needed to ease UN climate deal
By CHARLES J. HANLEY (AP) 22 hours ago

NEW YORK Money on the table perhaps $10 billion a year or more could help close a deal in Denmark next month and keep climate talks moving toward a new global treaty in 2010. But if poorer nations see too little offered up front, the U.N. conference could end in discord.

The money would help developing countries cope with ocean flooding, drought and other effects of climate change, while also helping them cut down on emissions of global-warming gases. The funds might eventually come from new sources, such as a tax on airline flights, but negotiators for now are seeking quicker infusions.

"Rich countries must put at least $10 billion a year on the table to kick-start immediate action up to 2012," the U.N. climate chief, Yvo de Boer, told reporters last week in a preview of the two-week conference opening next Monday in Copenhagen.

His goal gathered backing in recent days, including from French President Nicolas Sarkozy and Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who said his nation would contribute $1.3 billion over three years.

"The rest of Europe will do so," Brown told a Commonwealth summit in Trinidad on Friday. "And I believe America will do so as well."

U.S. President Barack Obama and the Chinese leadership energized lagging climate talks last week by announcing modest targets for controlling their countries' emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases blamed for warming the atmosphere.

Although talks will now be extended, Copenhagen was originally meant to culminate years of negotiation centered on two pillars: emissions reductions and financial aid for developing countries to adapt to climate change.

The proposed emissions targets by industrialized nations for 2020 and China's plan to slow emissions growth fall short of what scientists say is needed to head off damaging climate change. But if developing nations accept the quick-start financing, a deal might be reached at Copenhagen on a framework for putting all elements in a binding agreement next year, with an eye toward deeper emissions cuts and heftier financing beyond that.

"Short-term finance would be used as an opportunity to get a political buy-in for the other elements of an agreement," said Athena Ballesteros, a climate-finance expert at the Washington think tank World Resources Institute.

The needs are becoming increasingly clear.

An international scientific update last week said changes are happening faster than anticipated. Global temperatures are rising by 0.19 degrees C (0.34 degrees F) per decade, pushing the world into a time of climate disruption, species die-off and expanding seas. Oceans are rising by 3.4 millimeters (0.13 inches) per year, faster than predicted.

"It threatens to submerge the Maldives. My country would not survive," Mohamed Nasheed, president of that low-lying Indian Ocean island nation, told a conference of vulnerable nations earlier this month.

Offers of assistance thus far have been "so low, it is like arriving at an earthquake zone with a dustpan and brush," Nasheed said.

In scores of nations, money will be needed to build coastal protection, modify or shift crops threatened by drought, build water supply and irrigation systems, preserve forests, improve health care to deal with diseases spread by warming, and move from fossil-fuel to low-carbon energy systems, such as solar and wind power.

The World Bank estimates adaptation costs alone will total $75 billion to $100 billion a year over the next 40 years. The cost of mitigation reducing carbon emissions in poorer nations will add tens of billions to that. China and other developing countries say the target should be even higher, in the range of $350 billion.

De Boer's $10 billion a year to 2012 is barely a start. But "kick-start finance is so important because such finance will allow developing countries to plan," he told The Associated Press.

In fact, much of the funding would go to "capacity building" training, planning, getting a fix on needs, local emissions and related concerns.

Upfront money would also help rebuild trust between the rich north and poor south, eroded by years of relative inaction on climate, particularly by the United States.

Climate conference observers expect the European Union to offer most at Copenhagen, perhaps $5 billion a year or more. Japan might contribute $1 billion or more, as would the United States. Appropriations for 2010 totaling some $1 billion to $1.3 billion related to international climate aid are making their way through Congress.

"Quite simply it's the bottom line for getting a deal," New Zealand's Prime Minister John Key said of the financing package, as he pledged up to $50 million on Sunday at a Commonwealth summit in Trinidad.

Obama might use his Dec. 9 drop-by at the Copenhagen conference on his way to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway to announce a U.S. offer on financing. Some 80 other presidents and premiers are expected to attend the final days of the conference Dec. 17-18.

Finance expert Ballesteros expects Copenhagen to narrow the focus of talks next year on sources for longer-term, richer adaptation funding, such as a levy on international air transport, sharing in proceeds from the growing trade in carbon emission allowances, or even a global levy on carbon emissions.

Most important is that such revenue be "stable and predictable," not dependent on vagaries of budget-writing in national capitals, she said.

Emissions reductions, adaptation finance and other elements would be part of a hoped-for treaty or set of internationally binding agreements next year to succeed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. Its limited emissions reductions expire in 2012. The U.S. was the only industrial nation not to accept Kyoto.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iTRZ4QDU8I7b9Rc94wwerRVdws3QD9C9E8700

Rain Man
11-30-2009, 01:22 PM
Another alternative is to invest that money in a plague that Americans are inoculated against.

Chief Henry
11-30-2009, 01:54 PM
10 Billion $$$ per year Stooges

Whiskey
Tango
Foxtrot

Garcia Bronco
11-30-2009, 02:03 PM
"The money would help developing countries cope with ocean flooding, drought and other effects of climate change"


LOL...prove it. Because before "man-made global" warming was invented there were no floods or drought.

HonestChieffan
11-30-2009, 02:05 PM
If the Maldives put up a speed bump all around the shoreline they will be safe for generations.

Iowanian
11-30-2009, 02:10 PM
Cut off their food air drops to save the earth.

Hey Africa, GFYWET (go F Y-S w/ and elephant Tusk)

jjjayb
11-30-2009, 02:11 PM
And those of us who believe the global warming farce is all about one world government are still considered "fringe". :shake:

HonestChieffan
11-30-2009, 02:21 PM
Mybe he should ask the UN to help pay for the US to send back the illegals. They should buy into that, right?

Iowanian
11-30-2009, 02:44 PM
Well, let them eat Yellow Cake.

HonestChieffan
11-30-2009, 03:15 PM
Oh well....forget they lied.

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FishingRod
11-30-2009, 03:25 PM
Sometimes I have to tell my children no. Perhaps we as a country should do that from time to time.

SNR
11-30-2009, 11:56 PM
Sometimes I have to tell my children no. Perhaps we as a country should do that from time to time.We really should have considered abortion with some of our children

kcfanXIII
12-01-2009, 04:22 AM
NEW YORK Money on the table perhaps $10 billion a year or more could help close a deal in Denmark next month and keep climate talks moving toward a new global treaty in 2010. But if poorer nations see too little offered up front, the U.N. conference could end in discord.

a new global treaty? what exactly would we be agreeing to, besides giving money we don't have to poorer countries???

The money would help developing countries cope with ocean flooding,

when did the ocean's start flooding? ooooh, right, more predictions from the liars...

"Rich countries must put at least $10 billion a year on the table to kick-start immediate action up to 2012," the U.N. climate chief, Yvo de Boer, told reporters last week in a preview of the two-week conference opening next Monday in Copenhagen.

define "rich" countries. i'm pretty sure we are in debt to jesus's eyeballs at this point...

its all a load of crap. big old heaping load of crap. all lies to help sell another tax. this tax will go to other countries though. wake up people!

AndChiefs
12-01-2009, 05:49 AM
If I had as much debt compared to assets as the US I doubt many people would consider me rich.

FishingRod
12-01-2009, 12:51 PM
We really should have considered abortion with some of our children

That is rather a strange response. Would you care to elaborate? My point was that the world often looks at the US the same way as a child looks to it's provider. Everything will be expected to just be given to them until they hear the word no a few times. And the point you were making was?

SNR
12-01-2009, 02:45 PM
That is rather a strange response. Would you care to elaborate? My point was that the world often looks at the US the same way as a child looks to it's provider. Everything will be expected to just be given to them until they hear the word no a few times. And the point you were making was?It was a joke. I'm saying using your analogy the US has lots of problem children if we are the parents. Insert name of any country, really, I wasn't referring to any single one. For some it might be France, Russia, etc.

Fail on my part. Probably should have specified it.

FishingRod
12-01-2009, 03:32 PM
It was a joke. I'm saying using your analogy the US has lots of problem children if we are the parents. Insert name of any country, really, I wasn't referring to any single one. For some it might be France, Russia, etc.

Fail on my part. Probably should have specified it.

Ok sorry didn't know what you were saying but I'm with ya now