PDA

View Full Version : Education What events/people sparked your interest in politics?


Bearcat2005
01-16-2010, 02:59 PM
There may have been a thread like this at one point but I missed it. I was thinking the other day about what events/people in my life influenced me to become involved within the political realm and I was curious to hear stories of other posters.

First, what events or people in your life sparked your interest in government affairs?
Secondly what intellectual influences have guided and shaped your political and economic philosophy in life?

As for me I think September 11th really changed my life, I was a freshman in college getting ready to work toward my history degree when it happened. The events being awful as they may be did create more of an interest in history which evolved into political science. I decided later to major in both (forcing me into one more year of undergrad), however upon entering my final year of undergrad I decided to go for my master's in poly sci and during that time my interest evolved again but more into an economic focus on political events/ policies. During that time I feel the intellectual influences that really shaped my philosophy were/are Milton Friedman, Ludwig Von Mises, Ron Paul, Fareed Zakaria, John Locke and Thomas Jefferson.

When reflecting upon the past 7-8 years of my life I have noticed how my economic and political views have impacted my social views, when initially it was my social views that influenced my political ones. Anyway, please share.

ClevelandBronco
01-16-2010, 03:02 PM
The train wreck that was the Carter Administration.

Bearcat2005
01-16-2010, 03:05 PM
The train wreck that was the Carter Administration.

Those policies angered you enough to raise an eyebrow? I just find that many my age don't have much of a interest for it or know very little. Maybe I am being naive in thinking they should.

ClevelandBronco
01-16-2010, 03:14 PM
Those policies angered you enough to raise an eyebrow?
Mysteriously enough, yes.
I just find that many my age don't have much of a interest for it or know very little.
That statement could stand truthfully on its own without being limited to their knowledge of the Carter years.

Bearcat2005
01-16-2010, 03:17 PM
Mysteriously enough, yes.

That statement could stand truthfully on its own without being limited to their knowledge of the Carter years.

Yea, my generation never knew the joy of the 70's stagflation or Nixon's price controls and the harm that govt. intervention can create.

Bearcat2005
01-16-2010, 03:19 PM
What politican/economist/writer has influenced you the most?

BucEyedPea
01-16-2010, 05:44 PM
Ronald Reagan-politician original inspiration, now it's Ron Paul
Ludwig Von Mises-economist

Taco John
01-16-2010, 05:58 PM
American Legion Boys State

Jenson71
01-16-2010, 06:20 PM
Good thread. And Bearcat, we have some similarities. I, too, was an entering College Freshman going into History. When I figured it would be better for me mostly marketly speaking to have a double major, it was Political Science I turned to because of a general interest in current affairs.

But that was in 2006. There was no general event which threw me into it. Of course, September 11th also made me interested in political affairs as an 8th grader. But much more important were my History classes in high school, in which we dealt a good deal in current affairs. Particularly in my European History class my junior and senior years we would get into it.

Influenced almost entirely by my parents, I was a Republican then. Supportive of the Iraq War, a dislike of welfare and social programs like food stamps, which I saw firsthand working at Hy-Vee.

Probably not until deep in my freshman year did I become slightly more liberal, and along with that, more Catholic oriented. Maybe there was a connection between the two, but I haven't thought about it much. I did become more opposed to the Iraq War and Republican Party. I also disliked evangelical Christianity, the base of the Republicans. Now, I don't have so much dislike for evangelical Christianity as a whole. In fact, I can't even say I dislike it so much. Just disagree with it, mostly. Some things I dislike about it.

As a unique twist, I liked Ron Paul for a little bit, after my sophomore year. But in my junior year, my mind became much more economically liberal biased. I read Paul Krugman and through socialist friends, I became aware of a working class perspective. I have been influenced by my socialist friends to an extent, but I am still a follower of Paul Krugman's, economically. Along with that, I am a supporter of worker's unions, more government regulation over the economy, and prefer small business over corporations and would like government policy to reflect that, somehow. I totally abandoned Ron Paul and embraced Franklin Roosevelt. And still very Catholic. And that's my position today.

The Mad Crapper
01-16-2010, 08:42 PM
Hitler.

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 12:36 AM
As a unique twist, I liked Ron Paul for a little bit, after my sophomore year. But in my junior year, my mind became much more economically liberal biased. I read Paul Krugman and through socialist friends, I became aware of a working class perspective. I have been influenced by my socialist friends to an extent, but I am still a follower of Paul Krugman's, economically. Along with that, I am a supporter of worker's unions, more government regulation over the economy, and prefer small business over corporations and would like government policy to reflect that, somehow. I totally abandoned Ron Paul and embraced Franklin Roosevelt. And still very Catholic. And that's my position today.

He's a socialist and a spendaholic and you're one of his followers....but you say you're not a socialist? Logic FAIL. He's also completely wrong as are the socialists who have wrecked every country they've ruled in. I, however, do not expect that to deter you.

BTW when one claims to be economically liberal....it means liberalization of markets meaning freedom. Ya' know the way Sweden has in recent years begun to liberalize her markets. So as to rescue the country from the ravages of socialism.

You're economically hard left which is socialist and a Catholic. This is why, exactly, I say and say with more certainty that is Liberation Theology minus the violence.
But you are NO economic liberal,which stems from the Latin liberalis, "of freedom; worthy of a free man." You are not that but in the heavy control camp.

TigerPig
01-17-2010, 04:19 AM
I became disillusioned by our political process before I even got a chance to vote, during the whole 2000 election thing in Florida. It was after all of that it occurred to me my vote doesn't always count. It CAN count, sure, but only in a state where you voted for the majority. So if you are a conservative in California, or a liberal in Utah, your vote doesn't count... it disappears once the state has been tallied.

I think its important to clarify I still like politics, just not current events. This whole bickering back and forth crap about stuff like Guantanamo and universal health care... I'll leave that to other people. I enjoy talking about politics in theory more than in application. Marx, Smith, Keynes, Friedman... that stuff. And I can't remember what really got me started on that. I think it may be the American Government class I took in high school...

SLAG
01-17-2010, 04:36 AM
American Legion Boys State



This....

but i try to keep my interest in politics to a minimum as I feel i really have no say so in the system...

Earthling
01-17-2010, 07:02 AM
Vietnam

MarcBulger
01-17-2010, 09:13 AM
Watching an ass-clown like Mike Dukakis riding in a tank.....trying to out military a fighter pilot...

donkhater
01-17-2010, 09:49 AM
You're economically hard left which is socialist and a Catholic.

Whoa there, Kemosabi. I'm a Catholic and certainly not socialist. During this last election cycle I was able to talk to my pastors and they were all very enthusiastic about Paul. We even brought in a priest form the former Soviet Union for a talk. It was fascinating.

Jenson71
01-17-2010, 12:17 PM
He's a socialist and a spendaholic and you're one of his followers....but you say you're not a socialist? Logic FAIL. He's also completely wrong as are the socialists who have wrecked every country they've ruled in. I, however, do not expect that to deter you.

BTW when one claims to be economically liberal....it means liberalization of markets meaning freedom. Ya' know the way Sweden has in recent years begun to liberalize her markets. So as to rescue the country from the ravages of socialism.

You're economically hard left which is socialist and a Catholic. This is why, exactly, I say and say with more certainty that is Liberation Theology minus the violence.
But you are NO economic liberal,which stems from the Latin liberalis, "of freedom; worthy of a free man." You are not that but in the heavy control camp.

Very interesting. Thank you for that brand new perspective on this board.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 01:14 PM
Whoa there, Kemosabi. I'm a Catholic and certainly not socialist. During this last election cycle I was able to talk to my pastors and they were all very enthusiastic about Paul. We even brought in a priest form the former Soviet Union for a talk. It was fascinating.

She doesn't write very clearly sometimes. I don't think she's saying that socialist = catholic. I'm pretty sure she's saying that as a socialist AND a catholic, jenson71 has effectively adopted something like the liberation theology of the socialists in the central american clergy. IOW, socialist + catholic = ~liberation theologist.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 01:17 PM
For me, the three men who were most responsible for sparking my interest in politics were Tom Braden, Pat Buchanan, and George Will. I started watching CNN's crossfire when I was in college in the 1980s and reading George Will columns. I had a very liberal friend that I'd eat lunch with and talk politics. Of course, Ronald Reagan had a role too.

RedNeckRaider
01-17-2010, 01:25 PM
Late in life as I spent most of my life working and raising my kids. I just went to work and paid my bills and really never wasted much time thinking about it. One day not that long ago I started to pay attention and realized the government is beyond repair. It is corrupt and an embarrassment and I now think of it as an enemy~

WilliamTheIrish
01-17-2010, 02:02 PM
I credit my Mom for sparking my interest in politics. She was always very active in local Democratic action committees. She volunteered at the polling place in every election I can remember. I volunteered* (she drug me to the polling place) and I volunteered* (she forced me) to go door to door with her as she campaigned for her favorites.

Also, at the time my brothers were in the same high school with Tom Docking, the son of the former Kansas governor Robert Docking. As a grade school kid I was a familiar face to the Kansas governor.

Looking back, most of the kids in my grade school did the same thing. Those damn Irish Catholics. So involved.

Baby Lee
01-17-2010, 02:06 PM
My interest in politics in inexorably intertwined with my interest in analysis, logic, and debate.

My mind reflexively sees what is and says 'why.' And in the case of politics, it's the draw of 'why do people become so passionate in their stances.' If I had to identify a single event, it'd be the first time I voted. It was a primary, and I had little interest in what was on the ballot. But I noticed that most of the stuff on the Dem ballot was uncontested, and there were some actual races on the Republican ballot. Plus there was someone I knew from church was running for state representative as a Rep. So I show up and it turned out our neighbor was a pollster. She asked me what ballot I wanted, already reaching for a Dem ballot, the look on her face when I said Republican sparked an intense curiousity [not to mention a reflexive unsecurity] in me, that I've explored ever since.

Moving on to University, my twin studies on Political Science and Psychology were quite formative, as I was studying how politics works coincidently with learning why people behave as they do. As I'm sure people are on here are aware, my 'faith' in the politic spectrum is not conservative or liberal, but Skinnerian. That is rewarded behaviors are repeated and punished behaviors are extinguished. This drives my assessment of both the possibility and danger of social engineering.

What comes from my 'gut' something I cognize without being able to control, is my emphasis on results and rejection of emotion. That is, I can't abide the notion that merely empathizing is sufficient or adequate governance. In this I admit I'm wholly from Mars, not Venus, probably a factor in why my sexual preference has not been a subject of even passing introspection. I'm a man, who likes women, and I prefer action to gabbing. Telling me you feel my pain will not reduce me to tearful gratitude, and no amount of listening tours will sate my desire for results. Give me results, give me a rationale, give me an action plan. That is what I desire.

Royal Fanatic
01-17-2010, 02:09 PM
My epiphany took place when I was in college watching the debate between Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter. Ronald Reagan talked about high tax rates and how they were strangling the economy. If I recall correctly, the top tax rate at the time was 70%. (That's what happens when Democrats get too much power for too long).

Ronald Reagan said "Let's get the government off the backs of the American people". It made so much sense and seemed so self-evident that I was hooked forever.

Of course, today the Obamabots are determined to put the government back on the backs of the American people as much as possible, but I digress.

InChiefsHell
01-17-2010, 02:24 PM
Grew up overseas in Germany and Spain in the 80's. Ronald Reagan was a huge influence on everything, and if you were an American overseas back then, at least in Europe, Reagan was awesome. So I was always a Republican, but the older I got the more conservative I became. Then in 1996 I got audited by the IRS. They basically fucked me with a dick big enough to make an elephant squeal...and I've pretty much despised the Federal Government ever since.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 02:44 PM
Good thread. And Bearcat, we have some similarities. I, too, was an entering College Freshman going into History. When I figured it would be better for me mostly marketly speaking to have a double major, it was Political Science I turned to because of a general interest in current affairs.

But that was in 2006. There was no general event which threw me into it. Of course, September 11th also made me interested in political affairs as an 8th grader. But much more important were my History classes in high school, in which we dealt a good deal in current affairs. Particularly in my European History class my junior and senior years we would get into it.

Influenced almost entirely by my parents, I was a Republican then. Supportive of the Iraq War, a dislike of welfare and social programs like food stamps, which I saw firsthand working at Hy-Vee.

Probably not until deep in my freshman year did I become slightly more liberal, and along with that, more Catholic oriented. Maybe there was a connection between the two, but I haven't thought about it much. I did become more opposed to the Iraq War and Republican Party. I also disliked evangelical Christianity, the base of the Republicans. Now, I don't have so much dislike for evangelical Christianity as a whole. In fact, I can't even say I dislike it so much. Just disagree with it, mostly. Some things I dislike about it.

As a unique twist, I liked Ron Paul for a little bit, after my sophomore year. But in my junior year, my mind became much more economically liberal biased. I read Paul Krugman and through socialist friends, I became aware of a working class perspective. I have been influenced by my socialist friends to an extent, but I am still a follower of Paul Krugman's, economically. Along with that, I am a supporter of worker's unions, more government regulation over the economy, and prefer small business over corporations and would like government policy to reflect that, somehow. I totally abandoned Ron Paul and embraced Franklin Roosevelt. And still very Catholic. And that's my position today.

Interesting and similar.
I too was a Republican during college, never really had much of a political influence through my parents though. You have completely abandoned Ron Paul? Including his view of what US foreign policy should be in regards to a non-interventionist approach? Can I assume you meant just economically speaking?

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 02:46 PM
Ronald Reagan-politician original inspiration, now it's Ron Paul
Ludwig Von Mises-economist

Reagan also inspired much of my political leanings, I really wasn't old enough though to know him as a president.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 02:49 PM
He's a socialist and a spendaholic and you're one of his followers....but you say you're not a socialist? Logic FAIL. He's also completely wrong as are the socialists who have wrecked every country they've ruled in. I, however, do not expect that to deter you.

BTW when one claims to be economically liberal....it means liberalization of markets meaning freedom. Ya' know the way Sweden has in recent years begun to liberalize her markets. So as to rescue the country from the ravages of socialism.

You're economically hard left which is socialist and a Catholic. This is why, exactly, I say and say with more certainty that is Liberation Theology minus the violence.
But you are NO economic liberal,which stems from the Latin liberalis, "of freedom; worthy of a free man." You are not that but in the heavy control camp.

I know that has always frustrated me, my thesis I finished last spring discribes economic liberalization's impact on the political liberalization of states. When someone in the non-political science field asks me about it and I describe it the usual response is, "I thought you were a libertarian or conservative"? :rolleyes:

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 02:51 PM
Vietnam

Did you serve or too young to serve? It seemed many became involved and well disillusioned as well during that time and well watergate.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 02:56 PM
Grew up overseas in Germany and Spain in the 80's. Ronald Reagan was a huge influence on everything, and if you were an American overseas back then, at least in Europe, Reagan was awesome. So I was always a Republican, but the older I got the more conservative I became. Then in 1996 I got audited by the IRS. They basically ****ed me with a dick big enough to make an elephant squeal...and I've pretty much despised the Federal Government ever since.

It seems the older I get the more "conservative" I become as well. Grew up basically poor and looking back I saw first hand what many well intended sponsors policies looked like.

Reagan did play on nationalism, it even seems America was waiting for a moral boost. Hollywood got on board too.

HonestChieffan
01-17-2010, 03:07 PM
I lived in Denmark and lived through the Vietnam war era just not old enough to have gone.

But saw the Johnson years, the way the country was torn apart, saw it on campus and realized the anti war people were the ones creating the discontent and saw we could not trust them. They were willing to destroy anything to make the case for peace? The race riots in Chicago were horriffic. When you see it every day walking to and from class and hear the words in classes, and see buildings set on fire and rocks and bottles thrown in the name of peace.....it doesnt add up.

Supported Nixon and had my trust shot to hell in Watergate, survived 18% interest and a 15% mortgage under Carter, saw family farm disappear under the crushing debt of interest just to put in a crop and what weakness internationally led to in Iran. But when Reagan came on the scene and we had just endured Carter, he brought back the desire to try to be involved.

Lots of that took place when I was in my 20's and 30'sand still was bit idealistic. As I got older and realized it was more than idealism, that there really were people who felt they were entitled to take what I had earned, saved and accumulated that I felt a greater need to be involved.

The town halls of last summer were a real eye opener. To see others who care to be so willing to speak out and to try to get the country back to the very idea that Americanism is good and positive and that patriotism is what makes a country strong was incredible.

I believe we have turned the corner and we are on a path that with just a bit of effort, we can get the country back and we can have unlimited opportunity for the generations to come.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 03:15 PM
I lived in Denmark and lived through the Vietnam war era just not old enough to have gone.

But saw the Johnson years, the way the country was torn apart, saw it on campus and realized the anti war people were the ones creating the discontent and saw we could not trust them. They were willing to destroy anything to make the case for peace? The race riots in Chicago were horriffic. When you see it every day walking to and from class and hear the words in classes, and see buildings set on fire and rocks and bottles thrown in the name of peace.....it doesnt add up.

Supported Nixon and had my trust shot to hell in Watergate, survived 18% interest and a 15% mortgage under Carter, saw family farm disappear under the crushing debt of interest just to put in a crop and what weakness internationally led to in Iran. But when Reagan came on the scene and we had just endured Carter, he brought back the desire to try to be involved.

Lots of that took place when I was in my 20's and 30'sand still was bit idealistic. As I got older and realized it was more than idealism, that there really were people who felt they were entitled to take what I had earned, saved and accumulated that I felt a greater need to be involved.

The town halls of last summer were a real eye opener. To see others who care to be so willing to speak out and to try to get the country back to the very idea that Americanism is good and positive and that patriotism is what makes a country strong was incredible.

I believe we have turned the corner and we are on a path that with just a bit of effort, we can get the country back and we can have unlimited opportunity for the generations to come.

I like your optimism, I would share it except I am not sure the Republicans have made the changes necessary to embrace a smaller more limited government. I see signs of such though but just want them to prove it.

HonestChieffan
01-17-2010, 03:20 PM
I like your optimism, I would share it except I am not sure the Republicans have made the changes necessary to embrace a smaller more limited government. I see signs of such though but just want them to prove it.

Im optomistic because WE are the republicans. There is no They. We will nominate and vote for the people who run as republicans in primarys across the country. that is the transformation we need.

At the same time, when WE stay home and dont get to the polls, in thet regard we are the ones who let THEM take over.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 03:26 PM
Im optomistic because WE are the republicans. There is no They. We will nominate and vote for the people who run as republicans in primarys across the country. that is the transformation we need.

At the same time, when WE stay home and dont get to the polls, in thet regard we are the ones who let THEM take over.

If the Republicans can weed out the big government/big spenders I would be more than happy to jump on the wagon. It is just so frustrating to see people like Roy Blunt get the nod from the Republicans and go practically unchallenged into the primary because the NRSC is funding them based on patronage not merit. He is one of the biggest spenders the Repubs had during their control of the house.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 03:37 PM
I like your optimism, I would share it except I am not sure the Republicans have made the changes necessary to embrace a smaller more limited government. I see signs of such though but just want them to prove it.

I think it's pretty optimistic to believe that smaller, more limited government can be popular enough to support a political movement over the long haul. Reagan couldn't even manage it.

Bearcat2005
01-17-2010, 03:59 PM
I think it's pretty optimistic to believe that smaller, more limited government can be popular enough to support a political movement over the long haul. Reagan couldn't even manage it.

Im not arguing if it is popular or not, im arguing this belief that the Repubs will be committed to such principles. I actually do believe that once people experience a real effort and experience of such will only enlarge one's voter base.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 04:21 PM
Im not arguing if it is popular or not, im arguing this belief that the Repubs will be committed to such principles. I actually do believe that once people experience a real effort and experience of such will only enlarge one's voter base.

Ignoring your first sentence, your second is the very thing I'm skeptical about. I think there is a very real chance that once people experience a real effort to shrink government, they will throw the small government politicians out on their ear. I hope my pessimism is unwarranted though.

Jenson71
01-17-2010, 04:39 PM
Interesting and similar.
I too was a Republican during college, never really had much of a political influence through my parents though. You have completely abandoned Ron Paul? Including his view of what US foreign policy should be in regards to a non-interventionist approach? Can I assume you meant just economically speaking?

Primarily economically. I'm not totally against his non-interventionist approach. My views of American foreign policy are under-developed. I am welcome to both the isolationist trend and the moral prerogative trend.

Baby Lee
01-17-2010, 05:02 PM
As a unique twist, I liked Ron Paul for a little bit, after my sophomore year. But in my junior year, my mind became much more economically liberal biased. I read Paul Krugman and through socialist friends, I became aware of a working class perspective. I have been influenced by my socialist friends to an extent, but I am still a follower of Paul Krugman's, economically. Along with that, I am a supporter of worker's unions, more government regulation over the economy, and prefer small business over corporations and would like government policy to reflect that, somehow. I totally abandoned Ron Paul and embraced Franklin Roosevelt. And still very Catholic. And that's my position today.

It seems the older I get the more "conservative" I become as well. Grew up basically poor and looking back I saw first hand what many well intended sponsors policies looked like.

Reagan did play on nationalism, it even seems America was waiting for a moral boost. Hollywood got on board too.

Maybe instead of all the old fogey's chiding Jenson, these two should 'rap.' Is that what the kids are calling it these days?

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 05:51 PM
For me, the three men who were most responsible for sparking my interest in politics were Tom Braden, Pat Buchanan, and George Will. I started watching CNN's crossfire when I was in college in the 1980s and reading George Will columns. I had a very liberal friend that I'd eat lunch with and talk politics. Of course, Ronald Reagan had a role too.

That explains a lot!

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 05:52 PM
Whoa there, Kemosabi. I'm a Catholic and certainly not socialist. During this last election cycle I was able to talk to my pastors and they were all very enthusiastic about Paul. We even brought in a priest form the former Soviet Union for a talk. It was fascinating.

Yeah, but I said he was socialist and Catholic which means he's in the Liberation Theology camp. If you're a Catholic and not a socialist, and I know many, you're not in the Liberation Theology camp. Men like libertarian Tom Woods and Paleo-Con Buchanan are not socialist and are Catholic. I think you misread that.

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 05:57 PM
Moving on to University, my twin studies on Political Science and Psychology were quite formative, as I was studying how politics works coincidently with learning why people behave as they do. As I'm sure people are on here are aware, my 'faith' in the politic spectrum is not conservative or liberal, but Skinnerian. That is rewarded behaviors are repeated and punished behaviors are extinguished. This drives my assessment of both the possibility and danger of social engineering.
What? :shake: Didn't his own kid die trapped in some maze? Or was it she committed suicide. Must'a been the maze that incited that. Now I understand why you post as you do. :D

Baby Lee
01-17-2010, 06:00 PM
What? :shake: Didn't his own kid die trapped in some maze? Or was it she committed suicide. Must'a been the maze that incited that. Now I understand why you post as you do. :D

http://www.snopes.com/science/skinner.asp

There was no maze. There was nothing more than a climate controlled crib that kept her comfortable without being swaddled and layered in clothes.

And she's come out numerous times to say she had a bucolic childhood and was not experimented upon by her father or anyone else.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 06:10 PM
That explains a lot!

Like what?

I'm shocked you didn't zero in on Braden as proof (or what passes as it in your world) that I'm a liberal. :rolleyes:

Baby Lee
01-17-2010, 06:14 PM
Like what?

I'm shocked you didn't zero in on Braden as proof (or what passes as it in your world) that I'm a liberal. :rolleyes:

At least you have SOME direction as to what she's talking about.

For me, the fact that I buy into the psychological findings of someone she misremembers as some kind of child abusing suicide causer tells her everything about ME.

I have NO IDEA what 'why I post as I do' is supposed to mean, either.

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 06:14 PM
http://www.snopes.com/science/skinner.asp

There was no maze. There was nothing more than a climate controlled crib that kept her comfortable without being swaddled and layered in clothes.

And she's come out numerous times to say she had a bucolic childhood and was not experimented upon by her father or anyone else.

A climate controlled crib? Lol! Anyway, I was just having fun with "Skinnerian." :D Though the link was interesting.

Actually I never read the article on the maze/box or whatever contraption it was recalled as. I just heard an aunt say that about Skinner.

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 06:16 PM
Like what?
I'd rather keep my own counsel on it.

patteeu
01-17-2010, 06:30 PM
I'd rather keep my own counsel on it.

That's probably for the best.

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 07:27 PM
You bet!

Jenson71
01-17-2010, 07:30 PM
Yeah, but I said he was socialist and Catholic which means he's in the Liberation Theology camp. If you're a Catholic and not a socialist, and I know many, you're not in the Liberation Theology camp. Men like libertarian Tom Woods and Paleo-Con Buchanan are not socialist and are Catholic. I think you misread that.

I just need to point out that just because a person has some ideas that you see as being socialist and Catholic beliefs, doesn't mean they are in the "Liberation Theology camp."

BucEyedPea
01-17-2010, 07:32 PM
I thought you were going to post that Reverand Wright was one of your inspirations as well as the campus Marxists you met.

Jenson71
01-17-2010, 07:33 PM
I thought you were going to post that Reverand Wright was one of your inspirations as well as the campus Marxists you met.

It looks like you were wrong. Once again.

Velvet_Jones
01-18-2010, 03:03 PM
I grew up on a dairy farm west of Burlington Kansas. I cannot remember when I started to help milk the cows but I think I was 5. We got up at 4 am and milked cows until around 7 am. I caught the school bus at 7:15. After getting home from school we ate supper and then milked the cows again from about 6:30 pm until 9:30 pm. That was pretty much our life except the rest of the time we grew crops to feed the cows as well as a few cash crops. We were very self sufficient. That is where my conservative roots were born. My Dad was a simple yet smart man.

When I grew up, I went to KU to study math and got a few crazy (liberal) ideas. When I discussed them with Dad, he would shoot them down with little or no effort. It was a simple straight forward way of thinking that I now admire. The further I went in school, the more of what Dad said made sense. Through economics and statistics, what he said rang true. My Dad had a high school education and his dad had little more than a 3rd grade education. It’s ironic that it took me achieving an MBA in CIS before I considered myself their equal and fully understood their intellect. In my opinion, this actually has more to do with maturing than education.

For the individuals or the masses, there is no need for all these nuances. There is no need for all these excuses and justifications. What my Dad taught me and his dad taught him is: “Stand on your own and be accountable to yourself and your family. If you must rely on someone else, rely on family, friends and your church – in that order.”. If you notice, government is not someone you rely upon.

This is why I am conservative. This is how this country was built. This is why I reject the liberal agenda.

The Mad Crapper
01-18-2010, 03:13 PM
I grew up on a dairy farm west of Burlington Kansas. I cannot remember when I started to help milk the cows but I think I was 5. We got up at 4 am and milked cows until around 7 am. I caught the school bus at 7:15. After getting home from school we ate supper and then milked the cows again from about 6:30 pm until 9:30 pm. That was pretty much our life except the rest of the time we grew crops to feed the cows as well as a few cash crops. We were very self sufficient. That is where my conservative roots were born. My Dad was a simple yet smart man.

When I grew up, I went to KU to study math and got a few crazy (liberal) ideas. When I discussed them with Dad, he would shoot them down with little or no effort. It was a simple straight forward way of thinking that I now admire. The further I went in school, the more of what Dad said made sense. Through economics and statistics, what he said rang true. My Dad had a high school education and his dad had little more than a 3rd grade education. It’s ironic that it took me achieving an MBA in CIS before I considered myself their equal and fully understood their intellect. In my opinion, this actually has more to do with maturing than education.

For the individuals or the masses, there is no need for all these nuances. There is no need for all these excuses and justifications. What my Dad taught me and his dad taught him is: “Stand on your own and be accountable to yourself and your family. If you must rely on someone else, rely on family, friends and your church – in that order.”. If you notice, government is not someone you rely upon.

This is why I am conservative. This is how this country was built. This is why I reject the liberal agenda.

Jensen would be terrified to touch an utter. Unless it was attached to B.O.

http://www.freerepublic.com/images/freepathon/Imagine_NO_Liberals-vi.gif

Bearcat2005
01-18-2010, 03:16 PM
Primarily economically. I'm not totally against his non-interventionist approach. My views of American foreign policy are under-developed. I am welcome to both the isolationist trend and the moral prerogative trend.

One of the things that frustrates me on this board is when people refer to Paul as an isolationist, reducing trade barriers is one the most engaging economic activities we can have with other nations, increasing cooperation and providing another incentive against conflict.

BucEyedPea
01-18-2010, 03:16 PM
Hitler.

ROFL

Bearcat2005
01-18-2010, 03:17 PM
Maybe instead of all the old fogey's chiding Jenson, these two should 'rap.' Is that what the kids are calling it these days?

Some say your "hip" with it, is this true? :D

BucEyedPea
01-18-2010, 03:22 PM
One of the things that frustrates me on this board is when people refer to Paul as an isolationist, reducing trade barriers is one the most engaging economic activities we can have with other nations, increasing cooperation and providing another incentive against conflict.

Yup. That one on Paul is a red-herring and strawman.

Jenson71
01-18-2010, 05:58 PM
Jensen would be terrified to touch an utter. Unless it was attached to B.O.

What can I say, my family farm isn't dairy.

fan4ever
01-18-2010, 07:13 PM
The person that has inspired me the most to become politcally involved would have to be my "old hippie" mother-in-law and her ability to suspend all logic on a daily basis. It woke me up to realize she wasn't the only her thought like her . . . and that scared the hell out of me.

patteeu
01-18-2010, 08:41 PM
I grew up on a dairy farm west of Burlington Kansas. I cannot remember when I started to help milk the cows but I think I was 5. We got up at 4 am and milked cows until around 7 am. I caught the school bus at 7:15. After getting home from school we ate supper and then milked the cows again from about 6:30 pm until 9:30 pm. That was pretty much our life except the rest of the time we grew crops to feed the cows as well as a few cash crops. We were very self sufficient. That is where my conservative roots were born. My Dad was a simple yet smart man.

When I grew up, I went to KU to study math and got a few crazy (liberal) ideas. When I discussed them with Dad, he would shoot them down with little or no effort. It was a simple straight forward way of thinking that I now admire. The further I went in school, the more of what Dad said made sense. Through economics and statistics, what he said rang true. My Dad had a high school education and his dad had little more than a 3rd grade education. It’s ironic that it took me achieving an MBA in CIS before I considered myself their equal and fully understood their intellect. In my opinion, this actually has more to do with maturing than education.

For the individuals or the masses, there is no need for all these nuances. There is no need for all these excuses and justifications. What my Dad taught me and his dad taught him is: “Stand on your own and be accountable to yourself and your family. If you must rely on someone else, rely on family, friends and your church – in that order.”. If you notice, government is not someone you rely upon.

This is why I am conservative. This is how this country was built. This is why I reject the liberal agenda.

Good heavens. This is a real Crying Game moment for me. I still have feelings for you Velvet_Jones, but I disgust myself. :p

BTW, excellent post as usual.

NewChief
01-18-2010, 08:56 PM
My initial introduction to politics was listening to my family, literally, muse on whether Bill Clinton was the antichrist or not. I was conservative without even really knowing anything about it. I just basically believed like my parents believed. I went to college and got into the whole hippie thing. My original interests were in the libertarian movement. I got involved with a libertarian environmental group (Buffalo River Stewardship Foundation) and was pretty interested in the whole free market thing for a couple of years.

From there, I pretty much got apolitical for 5 years. I just saw the whole system as fucked. This was my drop out phase, where I was so anti-establishment that I saw the whole political process as too mainstream to even bother with. I stayed in that mode until graduate school. At that point, I had a Marxist professor who pretty much changed my entire worldview. Between his lectures and my growing fascination with proletariat literature and the labor movement, I became a fairly committed socialist for around 4 years. This coincided with my meeting my wife whose father grew up on the picket lines with his dad, who was a meat packer. This began my gravitation to the democratic party. I was pretty committed to them for the last 8 years or so.

At this point, I'm just freaking confused. I'm probably as close to the apolitical days of my hippie years as anything, although I still have an observer's interest in politics. I'm pretty damned cynical and not very happy with either side. I've got a lot of leftist leanings still, but I've become increasingly suspicious of and negative toward big government as found in the USA, especially.

Rain Man
01-18-2010, 11:46 PM
I think it's pretty optimistic to believe that smaller, more limited government can be popular enough to support a political movement over the long haul. Reagan couldn't even manage it.


I could be wrong, but didn't Reagan have the challenge of massive Cold War spending to finally break down the Soviets? Thus not being able to give people the full financial benefit of a smaller government.


As for the original topic, I'm actually much more interested in policy than in politics. I view policy as solving the world's problems and politics as being how you get policy enacted.

My first memory of politics was a small child, and my parents were worried that McGovern could get elected over Nixon, in which case he would legalize drugs. Neither happened.

My second memory was coming home and watching Nixon' resignation on TV. I was only about 11, but I still remember exactly what the room looked like and where I was standing when I watched it. I didn't quite understand the significance, but I knew it was significant.

My next real memory was a big debate about Ford or Carter in 7th-grade social studies. I was in the pro-Ford camp and none of us knew anything about anything. If our teacher was thoughtful, he probably would have had Nate Kaeding kick the chair out from under him.

I'll occasionally get interested in a political topic, but even today it's not a huge interest. Policy is much more interesting, in my opinion.

patteeu
01-19-2010, 06:46 AM
I could be wrong, but didn't Reagan have the challenge of massive Cold War spending to finally break down the Soviets? Thus not being able to give people the full financial benefit of a smaller government.

He did, but he never really reduced the non-defense portion of the budget either. He couldn't even get rid of the Department of Education or the National Endowment for the Arts which he campaigned against. Part of the problem he faced was that he never had Republican control of both houses of Congress, but that itself is evidence that the American people aren't completely receptive to smaller government. It would have been interesting to see how far he could have gone if he'd have had the kind of cooperative Congress that Barack Obama has now, but it's hard for me to imagine him being able to cut deeply into the real culprits of expanding government like the entitlements without serious political backlash. They don't call SS the 3rd rail of American politics for nothing. Sadly, much of big government is popular when you get right down to it.