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Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:10 PM
Anybody got any recommendations on an effective but inexpensive method of doing this?

Going to war with my soon-to-be-ex-ISP and I need to get those lying Indian fucks on tape.

patteeu
01-19-2010, 09:19 PM
Anybody got any recommendations on an effective but inexpensive method of doing this?

Going to war with my soon-to-be-ex-ISP and I need to get those lying Indian ****s on tape.

I bought something cheap at Radio Shack that let me record phone conversations on a basic cassette deck about a decade ago. They probably have something that would work for you although I suppose it probably wouldn't be for use with cassettes in this day and age.

patteeu
01-19-2010, 09:20 PM
P.S. "lying Indian ****s" sounds racist to me. :p

Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:22 PM
P.S. "lying Indian ****s" sounds racist to me. :p

Vailpass said it was okay. nlm

DaFace
01-19-2010, 09:23 PM
There are lots of options these days for equipment. I don't have a recommendation for any specific one, but my guess is there isn't much to it.

Do make sure that you know the laws governing the recording, though. In most places, you'll at least have to inform the other party that you're recording it at the beginning of the call at a minimum.

DaFace
01-19-2010, 09:25 PM
Here. Try this place.

http://www.telephonecallrecorder.com/

And this.

http://www.callcorder.com/phone-recording-law.htm

Ari Chi3fs
01-19-2010, 09:26 PM
Frazod. I use Skype. For $30 a year, I can make unlimited calls to US and Canada... and I have a separate private number. I think you can do the same for $2.95 or something for the month.

VOIP, crystal clear. And with a plugin called Pamela, you can record the conversations into an MP3.

Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:27 PM
There are lots of options these days for equipment. I don't have a recommendation for any specific one, but my guess is there isn't much to it.

Do make sure that you know the laws governing the recording, though. In most places, you'll at least have to inform the other party that you're recording it at the beginning of the call at a minimum.

Oh, I plan on it. Basically, my ISP told me back in October I could cancel service this month without penalty. Today they told my wife that we can't cancel for another 8 months or we have to pay a $150 termination fee. Plus they're saying we'll owe them another $80 for a modem. They claimed to have no record of our earlier call and refused to put anything in writing. I wonder how they'll respond when I say "I'm recording this conversation for my attorney."

Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:28 PM
Frazod. I use Skype. For $30, I can make unlimited calls to US and Canada... and I have a separate private number.

VOIP, crystal clear. And with a plugin called Pamela, you can record the conversations into an MP3.

I can't. I have AT&T for home service and cellphone. Switching to them for DSL now that it's available.

Mr. Flopnuts
01-19-2010, 09:33 PM
A simple digital recorder will do the job. I've done it dozens of times. Being a former bill collector, I've perfected the art of "scandalous fuck".

Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:36 PM
A simple digital recorder will do the job. I've done it dozens of times. Being a former bill collector, I've perfected the art of "scandalous fuck".

Any words of advice for my upcoming battle? The company in question is Earthlink.

Mr. Flopnuts
01-19-2010, 09:38 PM
Any words of advice for my upcoming battle? The company in question is Earthlink.

The key is getting them to admit the past conversation. That won't be an easy task, but any information you have regarding the date of the call, time, employee ID, anything will be helpful. All it takes is one admission. You'll be good. It's always a crapshoot, but I wish you luck with it.

Frazod
01-19-2010, 09:43 PM
The key is getting them to admit the past conversation. That won't be an easy task, but any information you have regarding the date of the call, time, employee ID, anything will be helpful. All it takes is one admission. You'll be good. It's always a crapshoot, but I wish you luck with it.

From what I've read, their standard MO is to claim they have no record of the prior conversation. Unfortunately we weren't suspicious of them when we called back in October (at that point we hadn't had any problems with them).

They can suck that $150 fee out of my ass. I've already contacted my credit card company and put a block on those bastards.

Mr. Flopnuts
01-19-2010, 10:09 PM
From what I've read, their standard MO is to claim they have no record of the prior conversation. Unfortunately we weren't suspicious of them when we called back in October (at that point we hadn't had any problems with them).

They can suck that $150 fee out of my ass. I've already contacted my credit card company and put a block on those bastards.

Well, be careful. If they have a signed contract, they can bury your credit score. You're better off ponying up the money and swearing them off for life.

However, if they don't have your signature, I wouldn't even worry about calling them. Fuck them. They have zero recourse. The trick is, the very second you get a collections notice, dispute it and request the original contract. Tell them you will sue if this goes on your credit without that proof.

Frazod
01-19-2010, 10:31 PM
Well, be careful. If they have a signed contract, they can bury your credit score. You're better off ponying up the money and swearing them off for life.

However, if they don't have your signature, I wouldn't even worry about calling them. Fuck them. They have zero recourse. The trick is, the very second you get a collections notice, dispute it and request the original contract. Tell them you will sue if this goes on your credit without that proof.

My credit rating is excellent. Even if they put something on my report (which I will instantly dispute) I can't imagine a $230 claim would put me in the shitter. It's not like American Express is going to repo my gold card over a shitty company like Earthlink.

And I never signed anything - everything was done over the phone. I certainly never signed anything extending my contract.

Mr. Flopnuts
01-19-2010, 10:33 PM
My credit rating is excellent. Even if they put something on my report (which I will instantly dispute) I can't imagine a $230 claim would put me in the shitter. It's not like American Express is going to repo my gold card over a shitty company like Earthlink.

And I never signed anything - everything was done over the phone. I certainly never signed anything extending my contract.

Oh, fuck em then. I mean, personally I'd never suggest picking credit points over $150. But if you never signed a contract extension, you've already met your obligation. Tell them to shit in their hat.

Frazod
01-19-2010, 10:42 PM
Oh, fuck em then. I mean, personally I'd never suggest picking credit points over $150. But if you never signed a contract extension, you've already met your obligation. Tell them to shit in their hat.

It's not very much money, but I'm tired of my ass being a non-stop party for these goddamn companies. Comcast took a chunk on the way out, so did Sprint. Enough with this souless fucks.

As Picard might say, the line must be drawn here. This far, no further. :#

Mr. Flopnuts
01-19-2010, 10:44 PM
It's not very much money, but I'm tired of my ass being a non-stop party for these goddamn companies. Comcast took a chunk on the way out, so did Sprint. Enough with this souless fucks.

As Picard might say, the line must be drawn here. This far, no further. :#

You've got a case on this one. If they can't prove that you extended a contract, they can't do shit to try and collect on it. I say good for you. I hate everyone of those fucks.

wild1
01-20-2010, 10:46 AM
Is there an easy way to do this with cellphones?

The Rick
01-20-2010, 10:51 AM
Google Voice. I can send you an invite if you'd like...

http://www.google.com/voice

Frazod
01-20-2010, 11:14 AM
Google Voice. I can send you an invite if you'd like...

http://www.google.com/voice

How does it work? Is it for a cellphone or a land line phone?

The Rick
01-20-2010, 12:09 PM
How does it work? Is it for a cellphone or a land line phone?
You get a new number assigned to you. Then, you set up that number to ring whatever other number you want, even multiple numbers.

For example, when someone calls my Google Voice number, it rings my cell phone, my home phone, and my work phone all at the same time. I simply pick up whichever phone I'm near. One number to reach me no matter where I am.

It also allows me, if I want, to make all three of those numbers transparent to everyone else. I just give out my Google Voice number. Then, if I switch cell phone companies, it's not a big deal if I get a new number...I just remap my Google Voice number to my new cell phone number.

There are a TON of other features. Voicemail-to-text transcription, free SMS, free long distance, different profiles (greetings, etc.) for different callers. If a telemarketer keeps calling my Google Voice number, I can simply block calls from them and make it seem like the number is no longer in service.

It's kind of goofy to make calls. You either initiate a call from the web site which causes your phone to ring before connecting you to the person you're calling, or, you call your own Google Voice number, press 2, then enter the number of the person you want to call.

However, it does provide the option to record a call. Inbound only though at this time, so you'd need to get them to call you at your Google Voice number. Here's more info about recording calls:

http://www.google.com/support/voice/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=115037

In short, Google Voice has the potential to be a killer service. For me, the only drawback is the difficulty in placing a call, if you want the call to look like it's coming from your Google Voice number.

wild1
01-20-2010, 12:41 PM
I would like a google voice invite. Do you have one?

Mr. Flopnuts
01-20-2010, 02:06 PM
I would like a google voice invite. Do you have one?

PM me an email address and I'll send one to you.

Frazod
01-20-2010, 03:50 PM
You get a new number assigned to you. Then, you set up that number to ring whatever other number you want, even multiple numbers.

For example, when someone calls my Google Voice number, it rings my cell phone, my home phone, and my work phone all at the same time. I simply pick up whichever phone I'm near. One number to reach me no matter where I am.

It also allows me, if I want, to make all three of those numbers transparent to everyone else. I just give out my Google Voice number. Then, if I switch cell phone companies, it's not a big deal if I get a new number...I just remap my Google Voice number to my new cell phone number.

There are a TON of other features. Voicemail-to-text transcription, free SMS, free long distance, different profiles (greetings, etc.) for different callers. If a telemarketer keeps calling my Google Voice number, I can simply block calls from them and make it seem like the number is no longer in service.

It's kind of goofy to make calls. You either initiate a call from the web site which causes your phone to ring before connecting you to the person you're calling, or, you call your own Google Voice number, press 2, then enter the number of the person you want to call.

However, it does provide the option to record a call. Inbound only though at this time, so you'd need to get them to call you at your Google Voice number. Here's more info about recording calls:

http://www.google.com/support/voice/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=115037

In short, Google Voice has the potential to be a killer service. For me, the only drawback is the difficulty in placing a call, if you want the call to look like it's coming from your Google Voice number.

I'll check into this more tonight. Thanks for the info. :thumb:

verbaljitsu
01-20-2010, 09:05 PM
1st, You need to be absolutely sure that the state you are in is a "one party notification state." If you live in a two-party notification state and record that phone call without telling them, you are committing a crime.

2nd, no attorney would take a case with $150 in damages. I would not threaten them at all with litigation, they will not take you seriously.

3rd, you don't have to sign anything to form a contract. The written instrument is good PROOF of a contract, but it is not the contract. A contract is an offer, acceptance, and consideration. It doesn't matter whether that happens orally, through correspondence, or whether it is memorialized in what people informally call contracts (what you normally sign).

I do not really have enough information to explain your legal position. The critical issue probably comes down to whether or not there has been a bargained-for-exchange when they "said you could cancel this month."

verbaljitsu
01-20-2010, 09:11 PM
Btw, Illinois appears to be a two party notification state. That means you can't legally record the call unless you notify the other party.

Note, the key word is notify. You don't need their permission.

Frazod
01-20-2010, 09:12 PM
1st, You need to be absolutely sure that the state you are in is a "one party consent state." If you live in a two-party consent state and record that phone call, you are committing a crime.

2nd, no attorney would take a case with $150 in damages. I would not threaten them at all with litigation, they will not take you seriously.

3rd, you don't have to sign anything to form a contract. The written instrument is good PROOF of a contract, but it is not the contract. A contract is an offer, acceptance, and consideration. It doesn't matter whether that happens orally, through correspondence, or whether it is memorialized in what people informally call contracts (what you normally sign).

I do not really have enough information to explain your legal position. The critical issue probably comes down to whether or not there has been a bargained-for-exchange when they "said you could cancel this month."

I work for a law firm, so if I need somebody to write shitty letters that won't be a problem. I have access to pretty much everything I need if this gets nasty. Actually, I'll write the shitty letter myself and have one of the lawyers sign it.

Frazod
01-20-2010, 09:13 PM
Btw, Illinois appears to be a two party notification state. That means you can't legally record the call unless you notify the other party.

Note, the key word is notify. You don't need their permission.

I have every intention of telling them. I assume it will alter the way they handle the call when they know their lies are being documented.

verbaljitsu
01-20-2010, 09:13 PM
Fair enough. Good luck.

Frazod
01-20-2010, 09:16 PM
BTW, Rick, apparently with that google thing you can only record calls that come in on a google-supplied telephone number, not calls you initiate. Won't work for this, since I'll be calling them. Thanks for the idea, though.

Frazod
01-20-2010, 09:17 PM
Fair enough. Good luck.

Thanks.

Mastashake
01-21-2010, 09:58 PM
Oh, I plan on it. Basically, my ISP told me back in October I could cancel service this month without penalty. Today they told my wife that we can't cancel for another 8 months or we have to pay a $150 termination fee. Plus they're saying we'll owe them another $80 for a modem. They claimed to have no record of our earlier call and refused to put anything in writing. I wonder how they'll respond when I say "I'm recording this conversation for my attorney."

Its quite possible they won't allow you to. They have no obligation to allow this if they feel they have you under contract. They have you under their thumb, unless they're nice about it they might refuse the recording.

Sadly enough, your only alternative could be to request audio from prior sessions or the written contract. If for some case they cannot produce either, then you don't have a contract and it doesn't matter. If they get argumentative or refuse to comply, get an attorney.