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View Full Version : Chiefs Carl Peterson: From $83 million to over $1B


T-post Tom
02-10-2010, 02:09 PM
TD Club banquet lands special speaker
By BILL WAGNER, Staff Writer


EDITOR'S NOTE: The Touchdown Club of Annapolis 56th Annual Football Awards Banquet, originally scheduled for Thursday, has been pushed back one week. the banquet will now be held at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 18, at the DoubleTree Hotel on Riva Road.


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To say Carl Peterson has enjoyed an interesting, memorable and notable career in football would be an understatement.

As Director of Player Personnel with the Philadelphia Eagles, Peterson came up with the idea for the open tryout that produced Vince Papale, who would later be immortalized in the movie ''Invincible.''

Peterson later became president, general manager and CEO of the Philadelphia Stars, the premier franchise in the short-lived United States Football League.

While serving as president, general manager and CEO of the Kansas City Chiefs, Peterson became close with a great linebacker named Derrick Thomas. It was with great sadness that Peterson gave the eulogy at Thomas' funeral and served as his presenter for posthumous induction to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Peterson will probably one day serve as presenter for his close friend and long-time associate Dick Vermeil, who will likely earn induction into the Hall of Fame as a head coach.

"It's been an absolutely great run and I was privileged to have been part of many great teams and organizations," Peterson said. "It's really the people you meet and the relationships you develop along the way that makes it so special."

Peterson, who retired after a 20-years as the top executive for the Kansas City Chiefs, now serves as chairman of USA Football - the national governing body for the sport. The 65-year-old California native will share many of his memories and experiences as guest speaker of the 56th annual Touchdown Club of Annapolis football awards banquet. The event has been pushed back to Feb. 18.

"I loved my time in the NFL, but it was time to go in a different direction and I am really enjoying this new role of trying to grow and expand the sport I love so much," said Peterson, who replaced the late Jack Kemp as chairman of USA Football last year. "I believe in the mission of this organization and am proud of what it has been able to do in terms of helping make football better by teaching and training coaches, officials and players."

Peterson, a native of Long Beach, Calif., played briefly at UCLA and decided while an undergraduate he wanted to fashion a career in football. He served as head coach at his alma mater of Woodrow Wilson High shortly after graduation and became head coach of Division II Sonoma State College at the age of 26.

Peterson was hired as an assistant coach at UCLA by Vermeil. Because Peterson had a doctorate in Administration and Higher Education, he was asked by Vermeil to also serve as the team's operations director, which would hint at a future in administration.

In 1976, UCLA captured the Pac-10 championship and upset top-ranked Ohio State in the Rose Bowl. The Bruins were 16-point underTIM-MAY!s to an undefeated Buckeyes squad that featured Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin, but were able to avenge a 41-20 loss in a regular season meeting between the schools.

Philadelphia Eagles owner Leonard Tose was impressed by Vermeil and hired him away from UCLA shortly after the Rose Bowl. Peterson was one of only a few assistants Vermeil brought with him to the NFL, initially serving as wide receivers and special teams coach for Philadelphia.

However, in 1977 Vermeil asked Peterson to move into the front office and he took over as director of player personnel for Philadelphia. Previous management had traded away the team's first, second and third round draft picks for 1976, 1977 and 1978 so Vermeil and Peterson held an open tryout to see if it would turn up any talent. Papale, a 35-year-old bartender, was the lone player invited to training camp and wound up spending three seasons with the Eagles.

Peterson spent the next five seasons assembling the roster that would propel Philadelphia to the NFC Championship and a berth in Super Bowl XV..

Two years later Peterson left the organization to become president, general manager, CEO and part-owner of the Philadelphia Stars of the fledgling United States Football League. He hired Jim Mora as head coach, signed talented future NFL players such as running back Kelvin Bryant, defensive tackle Irv Eatman and linebacker Sam Mills to create the standard-bearer franchise of the USFL. The Stars, who relocated to Baltimore in 1985, won two of three USFL titles.

Peterson resurfaced as president, general manager and CEO of the Kansas City Chiefs, who had made just one playoff appearance in the 15 previous seasons.

During Peterson's tenure from 1988-2008, Kansas City enjoyed 13 winning seasons, advanced to the postseason nine times and garnered four AFC West Division titles.

Peterson made a push to bring Kansas City a Super Bowl by signing two veteran free agents and future Hall of Famers. Quarterback Joe Montana and tailback Marcus Allen would lead the Chiefs to the AFC Championship in 1993, but the run ended with a loss to the Buffalo Bills.

A few years later, Peterson "got a chance to hire Tony Orlando and Dawn who once hired me" when he brought Vermeil to Kansas City after he won a Super Bowl with the Rams and went to the playoffs twice.

"I'm proud of what we were able to accomplish in Kansas City. When I started, the organization had 68 employees and the valuation of the franchise was $83 million. When I left, the Chiefs had 178 employees and were worth more than a billion," he said.
http://www.hometownglenburnie.com/news/Sports/2010/02/10-20/TD+Club+banquet+lands+special+speaker%0A.html

SDChiefs
02-10-2010, 02:52 PM
This franchise is worth over a Billion and they haven't been to a championship in over 40 years. I wonder what good franchises are worth.

ferrarispider95
02-10-2010, 02:54 PM
Yeah, some growth can be attributed to Carl, but the NFL as a whole has grown by tremendously.

L.A. Chieffan
02-10-2010, 02:57 PM
it was all Carl too. it it wasnt for him it would be valued at like 999 million or some ridiculously low number

kstater
02-10-2010, 02:58 PM
He "retired" in the same sense that I had sex with Halle Berry last night.

Frazod
02-10-2010, 03:01 PM
He forgot to mention his skill at alienating and offending top talent, hiring complete retards as coordinators and turning a sold out stadium into a 2/3rds empty crypt.

FUCK YOU CARL 4321

Mr. Laz
02-10-2010, 03:07 PM
once again Carl is taking credit for the overall success of the NFL as his own with the Chiefs.


**** YOU CARL 4321

Icon
02-10-2010, 03:51 PM
and how many AFC championship games did his teams win? Or Super Bowls? Once again the loser confuses making money with success. Every team in the last 20 years made money and every team's value increased. Are you going to take credit for that too, Carl?

STFU already.

Halfcan
02-10-2010, 04:23 PM
once again Carl is taking credit for the overall success of the NFL as his own with the Chiefs.


**** YOU CARL 4321

ROFL

ChiTown
02-10-2010, 04:27 PM
Yet, in 20 fucking years, he failed to even get to 1 mutherfucking SB.

Congrats, you underachieving sack of donkey cum!