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View Full Version : Misc Drywall and water question


ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 03:51 PM
I had a humidifier added to my heating system about 3 weeks ago. Dude tapped the hot water line with some kind of piercing clamp and then ran it via copper tubing into the unit. The hot water heater and main hot water line is located in attic space above my garage.

When I got home last night I saw some discoloration at the edge of my ceiling. I look closer and there were some pea sized bubbling of the paint. I think, oh crap and go look in the attic. Sure enough the clamp is drip, drip, dripping. No standing water but the area (6' x' 6') was wet.

I got it fixed this morning. They will pay to redo the drywall but I don't know if I want to put up with the whole process of cutting, mudding, sanding and all that. The drywall in the ceiling is not sagging and is hard to the touch except for the bubbles which basically popped.

Question: Will it dry out and not be an issue or should I get it replaced?

Any advice?

Bwana
02-11-2010, 03:54 PM
Replace it. You don't want mold issues.

Pablo
02-11-2010, 03:55 PM
Replace it. You don't want mold issues.What he said.

Water is DEATH to your home.

kstater
02-11-2010, 03:55 PM
Without a doubt, if it soaked through, replace it.

Bacon Cheeseburger
02-11-2010, 03:57 PM
Any mold on it? If so, I'd definitely tear it out, if not, I wouldn't worry about it. Although if it's a textured ceiling it may fall apart the next time you (or whoever) paints it, the water can cause the textured coating to come loose from the drywall.

Edit: I read it as 6" x 6" the first time, I would be far more concerned over that large of an area. There's no way to dry out the water that seeped in between the framing and drywall and mold WILL grow in that area.

Phobia
02-11-2010, 03:57 PM
3 weeks ago? As long as the area will dry now that the leak is resolved mold shouldn't be an issue for you. 3 weeks isn't long enough for mold to form and as long as the area actually dries completely, no worries.

As long as you're okay with any minor cosmetic blemishes created, you'll probably be just fine.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:03 PM
3 weeks ago? As long as the area will dry now that the leak is resolved mold shouldn't be an issue for you. 3 weeks isn't long enough for mold to form and as long as the area actually dries completely, no worries.

As long as you're okay with any minor cosmetic blemishes created, you'll probably be just fine.

I had it installed Jan 19th but I don't think it started leaking right away. I'm guessing it's been there for about 2 weeks. The attic has good ventilation and like I said there was no standing water, just wet. The blown in insulation was wet too but not smashed down. The moisture mostly followed the 2" x 6" rafters and then spread out into the drywall panels.

If it did mildew/mold wouldn't I know about it in the next week or two?

Brock
02-11-2010, 04:07 PM
Get the wet insulation out of there. Dry the area out with a fan.

Bacon Cheeseburger
02-11-2010, 04:12 PM
I had it installed Jan 19th but I don't think it started leaking right away. I'm guessing it's been there for about 2 weeks. The attic has good ventilation and like I said there was no standing water, just wet. The blown in insulation was wet too but not smashed down. The moisture mostly followed the 2" x 6" rafters and then spread out into the drywall panels.

If it did mildew/mold wouldn't I know about it in the next week or two?
You don't really want to wait around to see if mold will happen.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:12 PM
Get the wet insulation out of there. Dry the area out with a fan.

I would have to shovel it out. It's that blown in stuff. It's 12" deep and spread almost entirely over the drywall and rafters. It would be as hard to remove it and then replace it as it would be to have the drywall replaced. I do have a fan I can put up there to move the air directly. The temp in my attic is about 55 degrees max.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:14 PM
You don't really want to wait around to see if mold will happen.

Makes me nervous. I can get a guy to come and take a look and give me his estimate and opinion. Maybe that's the smart move.

Brock
02-11-2010, 04:15 PM
I would have to shovel it out. It's that blown in stuff. It's 12" deep and spread almost entirely over the drywall and rafters. It would be as hard to remove it and then replace it as it would be to have the drywall replaced. I do have a fan I can put up there to move the air directly. The temp in my attic is about 55 degrees max.

Well, that stuff is going to hold a lot of water. Leave it up there at your own risk.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:16 PM
Well, that stuff is going to hold a lot of water. Leave it up there at your own risk.

That's what I'm thinking.

Bacon Cheeseburger
02-11-2010, 04:17 PM
Makes me nervous. I can get a guy to come and take a look and give me his estimate and opinion. Maybe that's the smart move.
You definitely don't want to leave the wet insulation laying on wet drywall, that will never thoroughly dry. Even if you do nothing else, get that insulation out of there. Soon.

Bwana
02-11-2010, 04:19 PM
I would have to shovel it out. It's that blown in stuff. It's 12" deep and spread almost entirely over the drywall and rafters. It would be as hard to remove it and then replace it as it would be to have the drywall replaced. I do have a fan I can put up there to move the air directly. The temp in my attic is about 55 degrees max.

You shouldn't have to do Jack crap. They screwed it up, they need to pick up the bill. Have it taken care of to be sure.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:25 PM
You shouldn't have to do Jack crap. They screwed it up, they need to pick up the bill. Have it taken care of to be sure.

They will pay. I'm more concerned about the workers stomping around in and around the attic. Since I live on a hill it's going to take some time to do.

rockymtnchief
02-11-2010, 04:36 PM
They will pay. I'm more concerned about the workers stomping around in and around the attic. Since I live on a hill it's going to take some time to do.

Better to have them stomp around than have mold spread. I know people who've had to move out of their house because of mold. It can make some people very sick.

I don't know about every state, but most lenders won't let you buy a house with mold problems. Just something to consider down the road.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 04:55 PM
Thanks for the info fellas.

Phobia
02-11-2010, 05:16 PM
You definitely don't want to leave the wet insulation laying on wet drywall, that will never thoroughly dry. Even if you do nothing else, get that insulation out of there. Soon.

Indeed. That won't dry by itself nor with a fan. Get that wet insulation out if you have any hopes of resolving this non-invasively.

bevischief
02-11-2010, 06:14 PM
Burn it to the ground, only way to be sure there is no mold.

Over-Head
02-11-2010, 06:55 PM
Well, that stuff is going to hold a lot of water. Leave it up there at your own risk.Not too mention the gypsum will break down and crumble under the paper it's wrapped in leaving you with a nice big sag in your ceiling about 6 months from now.
Funny thing about gyproc.
IT SWELLS WHEN WET crumbles up quite nicely too. Not to mention it will losen around the nails/screws holding it up as Gypsum board in any other form than DRY has absolutely NO R-Value, or strength integrity

Pro advice from a plasterer/mud tape man
*Hire a taper to come in and give you a quote to repair it properly.

OR

If you don't care about a "potential health risk involving MOLD" / or give a rats ass that your ceiling WILL sag out
Hit it with BiN (by Zinzer), freshstart(by Benjamin Moore), or any Oil based primer, repaint white and *pretend it didn't happen

Phobia
02-11-2010, 08:58 PM
OH gave the best advice on the thread. As long as you get the wet insulation out and replace it, there's no mold risk. Mold takes more than double that time to develop but the gypsum & paper breakdown is legit.

stevieray
02-11-2010, 09:07 PM
makes mud.

ChiefaRoo
02-11-2010, 09:15 PM
OH gave the best advice on the thread. As long as you get the wet insulation out and replace it, there's no mold risk. Mold takes more than double that time to develop but the gypsum & paper breakdown is legit.

I went up there and scooped out a bunch of the wet insulation. Hopefully it'll dry now. It's drying quickly. Glad to hear about mold issue. I don't think more than 3 or 4 gallons of water has been let loose up there over 2 weeks. We'll see.

Phobia
02-11-2010, 09:38 PM
Buy another bag of the stuff for $7 at the sto. Loosen it up to put it back in place after it's good and dry.

mikeyis4dcats.
02-12-2010, 10:21 AM
OH gave the best advice on the thread. As long as you get the wet insulation out and replace it, there's no mold risk. Mold takes more than double that time to develop but the gypsum & paper breakdown is legit.

not really true. Mold can start to grow in a matter of days if the conditions are right.

ChiefaRoo
02-12-2010, 03:15 PM
not really true. Mold can start to grow in a matter of days if the conditions are right.

Drywall guy is coming on Tues. for an opinion and estimate.

bevischief
02-12-2010, 05:00 PM
Fire, fire, fire...

Over-Head
02-17-2010, 03:17 PM
not really true. Mold can start to grow in a matter of days if the conditions are right.
Everything is possible, but at this stage, (no apparent black fuzzy crap looking sorta like those SB leftovers you threw out yesterday, yet) spraying the area with a mist bottle of clorox sure wouldn't hurt after it's all dried out. You don't have to go crazy, but the bleach might prevent something nasty down the road.

ChiefaRoo
02-20-2010, 02:26 PM
Ok, so I got the drywall problem solved.

However, I went and took a look at the way the guy tied into my main hot water line and found out the moron tapped into a flex/plastic main line with a copper piercing valve. He used a nut and two brackets on either side to hold it in place which pinches the hose. I called the company and spoke with the owner. He told me his manager made a mistake and sent a guy who WASN'T a plumber. So I call a plumber and he looks at it and says, "This isn't code and within a few months this thing is going to explode and flood your entire attic" and by extension my house. Unbelievable.

Phobia
02-20-2010, 02:29 PM
Ok, so I got the drywall problem solved.

However, I went and took a look at the way the guy tied into my main hot water line and found out the moron tapped into a flex/plastic main line with a copper piercing valve. He used a nut and two brackets on either side to hold it in place which pinches the hose. I called the company and spoke with the owner. He told me his manager made a mistake and sent a guy who WASN'T a plumber. So I call a plumber and he looks at it and says, "This isn't code and within a few months this thing is going to explode and flood your entire attic" and by extension my house. Unbelievable.

Yeah - that's just plain lazy stupidity.

ChiefaRoo
02-20-2010, 02:39 PM
I'm really amazed. I've had all sorts of hell with contractors in Austin. I've lived in KS, Atlanta and Memphis. I've owned a house in each place and Austin has to have the worst group of tradesmen I've ever run into.

Home builder - meh. I bought a new spec house and have had over 20 significant warranty items in the past 1 1/2 years. They've all been taken care of but what an incredible pain in the ass it's been.

Phobia
02-20-2010, 02:42 PM
Home builder - meh. I bought a new spec house and have had over 20 significant warranty items in the past 1 1/2 years.
Sounds like you have an amazing builder. Most homeowners start getting blown off after the 2nd or 3rd callback.

Hog Farmer
02-20-2010, 02:45 PM
Mold is over rated . Cut off the source of water and it will die.

ChiefaRoo
02-20-2010, 02:53 PM
Sounds like you have an amazing builder. Most homeowners start getting blown off after the 2nd or 3rd callback.

They're a good outfit with a good reputation and the home was a floor plan demo. (meaning it had a lot of foot traffic for about 10 months before I even showed up) I made sure the warranty was for two years across the board. I negotiated it special. Now, I wish I would of negotiated a better built house instead. :)