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View Full Version : Food and Drink Tenderizing inexpensive Sirloin Steak?


DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 08:22 PM
Hey Master Grillers,

My wife and I had some pretty decent inexpensive Costco Sirloin steaks during our last visit to Kansas City. My mom didn't do anything special; just some butter and a little rub. They were pretty tasty and definitely worth the $3.19 a pound she paid for them.

My wife's parents are visiting for the next week so at Costco, I decided to pick up the same steaks, albeit, Cal Beef style (which is nothing like corn fed Midwestern beef). I did the same thing, a little butter and rub. Unfortunately, even though I grilled them to be very rare and medium rare, they were really chewy and pretty much devoid of flavor.

Generally to get a great cut of steak, I have to spend anywhere from $17.99-23.99 a pound, and those are always fantastic. We've never been disappointed. But I've got about 2.5 pounds left of this sirloin and the next time I grill them, I'd like them to be somewhat enjoyable.

So what say you, Dudes?

luv
02-16-2010, 08:25 PM
Have them bring some corn fed beef with them. :p

luv
02-16-2010, 08:26 PM
What kind of rub?

Mecca
02-16-2010, 08:27 PM
What kind of rub?

That's perverted.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 08:27 PM
What kind of rub?

I've got a couple - some steak rub from Omaha Steaks and Zarda rub. Tonight I used the Zarda.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 08:29 PM
Have them bring some corn fed beef with them. :p

Unfortunately, they don't have that in NoCal either, which is where my in-laws live.

The one good thing about not having inexpensive good beef is that for the past 17 years, I eat mostly chicken, which is healthier.

I'm rarely up for spend $50 dollars on steaks I have to grill myself. Holidays and anniversaries, maybe.

RJ
02-16-2010, 08:31 PM
With top sirloin, I generally marinate for maybe 30 minutes using red wine, chopped garlic, worcestershire and pepper. I salt just before grilling. It can be a nice cut.

TrebMaxx
02-16-2010, 08:33 PM
Cut in to 1 to 1 and 1/2 inch cubes. Marinate the heck out of them, I myself like to use McCormicks Mesquite marinade and make shis-kabobs out of it.

luv
02-16-2010, 08:37 PM
With top sirloin, I generally marinate for maybe 30 minutes using red wine, chopped garlic, worcestershire and pepper. I salt just before grilling. It can be a nice cut.

I think salt is key. The trick is not salting too much. I don't like the taste of salt itself, but, when the right amount is used, it can really bring out the flavor in what you're cooking.

Braincase
02-16-2010, 08:38 PM
I'd use a Jaccard Meat Tenderizer, same one I use on brisket and pork loin, then let 'em sit over night with a little lemon juice to break them down a little bit more. Season them the way you want to before putting them on the grill.

CrazyPhuD
02-16-2010, 08:50 PM
I think you might just be suffering from the fact we get shit beef out in CA. That's what I love about going back to KS, I can go to a place like denny's and get steak and eggs and that steak is better than a midrange steak house out here.

Hell if I'm cooking and I want good beef I order from omaha steaks. The only minor exception is that so far I've had decent luck at harris ranch off the 5. But other than that, beef here sucks, the sushi is better.

googlegoogle
02-16-2010, 08:53 PM
http://www.chefscatalog.com/img/products/285x285/20052_285.jpg

seen an electrical machine do it too. puts the meat between two rollers for pan fried steak.


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DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 08:59 PM
With top sirloin, I generally marinate for maybe 30 minutes using red wine, chopped garlic, worcestershire and pepper. I salt just before grilling. It can be a nice cut.

That sounds tasty, RJ. I may have to give this a whirl. Thanks!

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 09:00 PM
I'd use a Jaccard Meat Tenderizer, same one I use on brisket and pork loin, then let 'em sit over night with a little lemon juice to break them down a little bit more. Season them the way you want to before putting them on the grill.

I'd never heard of this before (clearly, I don't cook beef very often!).

Which model do you have? It seems they vary from three blades to 45.

Thanks!

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 09:01 PM
I think you might just be suffering from the fact we get shit beef out in CA. That's what I love about going back to KS, I can go to a place like denny's and get steak and eggs and that steak is better than a midrange steak house out here.

Hell if I'm cooking and I want good beef I order from omaha steaks. The only minor exception is that so far I've had decent luck at harris ranch off the 5. But other than that, beef here sucks, the sushi is better.

Oh, I can purchase good steaks but like I mentioned earlier, they'll run me anywhere from $17.99-$23.99 a pound. That's okay every three or four months but not much more than that.

The Jaccard sounds interesting...

Baconeater
02-16-2010, 09:33 PM
Throw them away and go out to a nice steakhouse.

Psyko Tek
02-16-2010, 09:35 PM
did a kosher /sea salt on some cheap steaks and it worked good
I thought it took thwe flavor out but the rest of the guests siad it was tender
it's a thread on here so take a look

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 09:36 PM
http://i48.tinypic.com/qpqmb4.jpg

ChiefsCountry
02-16-2010, 09:40 PM
Gates sauce
Worcester sauce
Soy sauce
Italian dressing

Mix with whatever salt, pepper, or rub that you want.
Posted via Mobile Device

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 09:47 PM
Gates sauce
Worcester sauce
Soy sauce
Italian dressing

Mix with whatever salt, pepper, or rub that you want.
Posted via Mobile Device

You may wanna hold off on the salt ON TOP of the Soy-sauce, don't be silly, you don't want to stroke out, afterward. Other than that, that actually sounds like a nice lil' medley of goodness.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 09:54 PM
Throw them away and go out to a nice steakhouse.

LMAO

Too bad I can't get out of a nice steakhouse for less than a buck fifty in this town.

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 10:01 PM
LMAO

Too bad I can't get out of a nice steakhouse for less than a buck fifty in this town.

yeah but they're good from time to time, Capital Grill here in Atlanta is amazing. They're a chain, I quote 'Jesus' Jenkins here, if Longhorn Steakhouse is a toyota, Capital Grill is their Lexy.

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 10:02 PM
pineapple juice and soy sauce OJ and brown sugar would be nice, Dane. Plus the acid in the juice WILL tenderize it.

HotRoute
02-16-2010, 10:09 PM
take a fork a stab a few holes in them, to open it up a little, then take some olive oil a touch of vinegar and your seasoning and mix it with a whisk. then let the steaks sit for exactly 2 hours at room temp. when their done marinating, and you've had a couple of hours to get the potatoes, veggies, or whatever else ready make sure the grill is at the right temp, throw em on flip once and lightly mainate one last time. and its all good

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:10 PM
yeah but they're good from time to time, Capital Grill here in Atlanta is amazing. They're a chain, I quote 'Jesus' Jenkins here, if Longhorn Steakhouse is a toyota, Capital Grill is their Lexy.

I don't even know if there's a Capital Grille in Los Angeles.

We went to Wolfgang's "Cut" restaurant last year and dropped $525 on steak and drinks. We dropped $225 at Jar just a few weeks back and it sucked.

Steak is rough in this town.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:10 PM
take a fork a stab a few holes in them, to open it up a little, then take some olive oil a touch of vinegar and your seasoning and mix it with a whisk. then let the steaks sit for exactly 2 hours at room temp. when their done marinating, and you've had a couple of hours to get the potatoes, veggies, or whatever else ready make sure the grill is at the right temp, throw em on flip once and lightly mainate one last time. and its all good

Thanks, Dude!

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:11 PM
Gates sauce
Worcester sauce
Soy sauce
Italian dressing

Mix with whatever salt, pepper, or rub that you want.
Posted via Mobile Device

Do I use a mixture of the above sauces and dressings or one, then the salt, pepper and rub?

Chocolate Hog
02-16-2010, 10:11 PM
LMAO

Too bad I can't get out of a nice steakhouse for less than a buck fifty in this town.

What he meant was go to Phillipes (sp?)

HotRoute
02-16-2010, 10:12 PM
the real secret is letting the meat get to room temp before cooking, it allows for a much more tender steak in the end. also give them about 2-3 min to rest before serving, like with most meats they actually become more juicy a few min after they're taken off of the direct heat. GL and hope it works out for ya

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:14 PM
the real secret is letting the meat get to room temp before cooking, it allows for a much more tender steak in the end. also give them about 2-3 min to rest before serving, like with most meats they actually become more juicy a few min after they're taken off of the direct heat. GL and hope it works out for ya

Thanks, Man.

These were pretty tough though at $3.19 a pound, that's not completely unexpected for Cal beef. But I'm sure that all of these great suggestions will go a long way.

:thumb:

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 10:15 PM
Do I use a mixture of the above sauces and dressings or one, then the salt, pepper and rub?

Dane, SImply Red here, I'm locked out of my acct. But, DO NOT add salt on top of Soy AND Worsh. In fact when using Soy, almost NEVER add additional salt, assuming he was speaking of a marinade.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:16 PM
Dane, SImply Red here, I'm locked out of my acct. But, DO NOT add salt on top of Soy AND Worsh. In fact when using Soy, almost NEVER add additional salt, assuming he was speaking of a marinade.

Thanks.

Yeah, Soyo is salty. We always buy the light (green cap) and it's still pretty salty.

The best Soyo we've found is in downtown LA in Chinatown (I know it's Japanese but they sell it there, too).

VERY little salt.

It's like having olives and prosciutto in Italy. NO salt.

morphius
02-16-2010, 10:17 PM
Ball bearings and a dryer should tenderize it nicely.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:18 PM
Ball bearings and a dryer should tenderize it nicely.

No anti-freeze?

Bi_polar
02-16-2010, 10:19 PM
Thanks.

Yeah, Soyo is salty. We always buy the light (green cap) and it's still pretty salty.

The best Soyo we've found is in downtown LA in Chinatown (I know it's Japanese but they sell it there, too).

VERY little salt.

It's like having olives and prosciutto in Italy. NO salt.


olives very well may be in my top ten in regards to delightful lil' finger-foods, namely, kalamata.

HotRoute
02-16-2010, 10:20 PM
isnt soy sauce made up of about 92% salt anyway? i thought the stuff was only really ever used on plain rice.

angelo
02-16-2010, 10:20 PM
Unfortunately, they don't have that in NoCal either, which is where my in-laws live.

The one good thing about not having inexpensive good beef is that for the past 17 years, I eat mostly chicken, which is healthier.

I'm rarely up for spend $50 dollars on steaks I have to grill myself. Holidays and anniversaries, maybe.

You should check the availability of Piedmontese Beef.
It is an all natural beef from Montana that has the same health profile of chicken and taste better than standard beef.
It is the only beef that I will eat.

Ang

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:21 PM
You should check the availability of Piedmontese Beef.
It is an all natural beef from Montana that has the same health profile of chicken and taste better than standard beef.
It is the only beef that I will eat.

Ang

Thanks, M'Ang

HotRoute
02-16-2010, 10:21 PM
I'm surprised nobody has suggested an AIDS flavored marinade yet.

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:23 PM
Sea salt, a little cajun, and garlic butter. Best Ever.

morphius
02-16-2010, 10:25 PM
No anti-freeze?
Actually I'm sort of serious, it was on an episode of mythbusters. Of course it did some terrible things to the dryer.

Chocolate Hog
02-16-2010, 10:26 PM
Dane have you tried to put your dick on it? That would help tenderize it you would think.

munkey
02-16-2010, 10:28 PM
chicken fried steak? beat the crap out of it and fry it...yum

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:28 PM
Actually I'm sort of serious, it was on an episode of mythbusters. Of course it did some terrible things to the dryer.

Yeah, I bet it did!

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:29 PM
Sea salt, a little cajun, and garlic butter. Best Ever.

Even on cheap, tough steak? Does the sea salt tenderize it?

munkey
02-16-2010, 10:31 PM
Even on cheap, tough steak? Does the sea salt tenderize it?


ummmm......no

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 10:32 PM
ummmm......no

Okay, that's what I thought.

It seems like the simplest solution is a tenderizer, like the model Braincase suggested.

But, I don't know that I want to spend $25 dollars for $15 dollars worth of steak I'll probably never buy again.

Truth be told, I only eat red meat about 15 times a year.

The overwhelming majority of my meat intake is chicken and fish.

Extra Point
02-16-2010, 10:34 PM
RJ and KC111110 have it about right.

Supermarket Steak Marinade:

1 tbsp Worcestershire
1 tbsp Italian Dressing

Put each (thawed) steak in a 1 qt food storage bag>add marinade>press ambient air out of bag>refrigerate minimum of 24 hrs before cooking>remove from refrigerator 3 hrs prior to grilling>grill

Without pulling a vacuum on the steak, which breaks up the meat tissue, you're not going to get potential deep marination. Pushing the air out of the steak in the food storage bag and zipping it shut is about the best you can do, cheap.

I sold vacuum pumps to specialty meat processors, including KC Steak Company, for their vacuumizing meat tumblers. Of course, they have their own recipe, but, given a little salt in the mix, such as in a Worcestershire or soy sauce, you can't go wrong. Just get as much air out of the bag. Flip your stuff every four to six hours, and you ought to be alright. 30 mins to an hour just won't cut it, as that will only flavor the surface.

Rubs only permeate the surface. Liquids penetrate, and, given time, will better penetrate into the tissue.

Good luck.

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:35 PM
Drown it in salt and let it sit for 30 min. Rinse it off and pat it dry.

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:42 PM
Don't freeze the steak, but keep it at a temperature close to freezing for about two weeks. Its kinda tricky though, because it can easily end up freezing or spoil if not done right.

munkey
02-16-2010, 10:45 PM
Drown it in salt and let it sit for 30 min. Rinse it off and pat it dry.


????

You have to beat it....just beat it..

http://www.ochef.com/358.htm

Soaking in salt is "marinating"...Not tenderizing...

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:46 PM
Hey Master Grillers,

My wife and I had some pretty decent inexpensive Costco Sirloin steaks during our last visit to Kansas City. My mom didn't do anything special; just some butter and a little rub. They were pretty tasty and definitely worth the $3.19 a pound she paid for them.

My wife's parents are visiting for the next week so at Costco, I decided to pick up the same steaks, albeit, Cal Beef style (which is nothing like corn fed Midwestern beef). I did the same thing, a little butter and rub. Unfortunately, even though I grilled them to be very rare and medium rare, they were really chewy and pretty much devoid of flavor.

Generally to get a great cut of steak, I have to spend anywhere from $17.99-23.99 a pound, and those are always fantastic. We've never been disappointed. But I've got about 2.5 pounds left of this sirloin and the next time I grill them, I'd like them to be somewhat enjoyable.

So what say you, Dudes?

Beat it, just beat it.

munkey
02-16-2010, 10:46 PM
Don't freeze the steak, but keep it at a temperature close to freezing for about two weeks. Its kinda tricky though, because it can easily end up freezing or spoil if not done right.

That's just retarded...why would you go through all that when you can just use a mallet?

munkey
02-16-2010, 10:50 PM
RJ and KC111110 have it about right.

Supermarket Steak Marinade:




are we talking marinade or tenderize....:spock:

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:54 PM
the salt getting inside the steak draws out the water and makes it more tender, but thats besides the point.

Extra Point
02-16-2010, 10:57 PM
are we talking marinade or tenderize....:spock:

Both. The purpose of a marinade is not only to flavor, but to tenderize the cut of meat. Ask the Scavuzzo family. They know their business.

RustShack
02-16-2010, 10:59 PM
I've worked in a couple different steak houses for years, but I'm sure an accountant knows more.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 11:01 PM
Drown it in salt and let it sit for 30 min. Rinse it off and pat it dry.

Sea salt or iodized?

RustShack
02-16-2010, 11:04 PM
Sea salt or iodized?

That way just iodized is fine. Flavoring it though sea salt is the best.

RustShack
02-16-2010, 11:05 PM
When you go that route to tenderize it though, youll rinse all the salt and pat most of it out so it wont be all salty.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 11:06 PM
That way just iodized is fine. Flavoring it though sea salt is the best.

I don't even have any iodized in my house.

If I'm going to salt something (which is very rare), we use sea salt.

Thanks!

munkey
02-16-2010, 11:07 PM
The overwhelming majority of my meat intake is chicken and fish.

Buy some chicken breasts from costco....place a breast between two pieces of saran wrap and use the mallet to tenderize them...To prepare...

ingredients: three eggs - beat'n
one cup of flour with salt and pepper
on cup of panko bread crumbs

Directions: Dip each breast in the eggs (like french toast), dredge in flour and then panko. repeat with all chicken and let sit in the fridge for at least 30 minutes...the longer the better as this helps the bread crumbs adhere to the chicken (egg batter cools) and cooks better. I like to prepare this LONG before I start my other side dishes and it cooks FAST.

When ready to cook heat some olive oil or what ever oil you prefer to smoke (medium high) and cook on each side until golden brown (roughly 5 minutes on each side). It's basically chicken fried chicken and it's so damn tender you can cut it with a fork and eat it by itself.

My kids won't eat chicken any other way....gravy and mashed potatoes are what I usually do with this meal but you could really do what ever chicken dish you desire really...be creative...

If you like Tune a I have an even better dish :p

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 11:09 PM
Buy some chicken breasts from costco....place a breast between two pieces of saran wrap and use the mallet to tenderize them...To prepare...

ingredients: three eggs - beat'n
one cup of flour with salt and pepper
on cup of panko bread crumbs

Directions: Dip each breast in the eggs (like french toast), dredge in flour and then panko. repeat with all chicken and let sit in the fridge for at least 30 minutes...the longer the better as this helps the bread crumbs adhere to the chicken (egg batter cools) and cooks better. I like to prepare this LONG before I start my other side dishes and it cooks FAST.

When ready to cook heat some olive oil or what ever oil you prefer to smoke (medium high) and cook on each side until golden brown (roughly 5 minutes on each side). It's basically chicken fried chicken and it's so damn tender you can cut it with a fork and eat it by itself.

My kids won't eat chicken any other way....gravy and mashed potatoes are what I usually do with this meal but you could really do what ever chicken dish you desire really...be creative...

If you like Tune a I have an even better dish :p

Thanks, Man! Sounds like I could do a nice chicken Parmesan dish with this as well.

We have GREAT chicken at Costco out here - Foster Farms. It's fresh and grills perfectly, so I bet this'll kick ass.

DaneMcCloud
02-16-2010, 11:09 PM
Thanks again to everyone.

You guys ROCK the kitchen!

RustShack
02-16-2010, 11:11 PM
When I worked at Lone Star I would use our onion breading and do something like that. Money. Crunchy Dip is pretty good too.

munkey
02-16-2010, 11:14 PM
Both. The purpose of a marinade is not only to flavor, but to tenderize the cut of meat. Ask the Scavuzzo family. They know their business.

No, I understand what your saying...the salt and other ingredients break it down...much like lime will do to fish. If you soak chicken in soy sauce in preparation of say...maffa chicken to long it will basically cook the meat...chemically. I just look at the word "tenderize" as what it is and to use a marinade to do so is not tenderizing IMO...BUT that's just me ;)

munkey
02-16-2010, 11:16 PM
Thanks, Man! Sounds like I could do a nice chicken Parmesan dish with this as well.



LOL...I've done that with this...AND it does rock :p

Had my mind on the mashed potatoes and gravy...:p

munkey
02-16-2010, 11:18 PM
We have GREAT chicken at Costco out here - Foster Farms. It's fresh and grills perfectly, so I bet this'll kick ass.

That's what we have here at our local costco as well...enjoy :-)

Consistent1
02-17-2010, 05:30 AM
The Great Dane frontin' with cheap meat. WTF is Hollywood coming to bro? I thought all of your meals were paid for by celebs that just wanted to be seen out with you?Then they hook you up with the keys to a Lambo or Ferrari and introduce you to a couple wanna-be starlets who will do anything to make it.Fucking Costo shit?You need a PR dude to help man.Modesty only works for those that aren't the real deal homey.
Posted via Mobile Device

crispystl420
02-17-2010, 06:11 AM
I've worked in a couple different steak houses for years, but I'm sure an accountant knows more.

This guy is right. I cook for a living.

the Talking Can
02-17-2010, 06:55 AM
slice it thin and do a korean style bbq/grill....

Saggysack
02-17-2010, 06:56 AM
California Beef or Operator Error. Meat isn't graded by what state it comes from. It's graded by the marbling. Seeing how it was Costco I'm going to take a leap and say that the cut was more than likely a choice cut. Which brings me to if you can't grill a sirloin and have it come out like cuttin like butter, then more times than not it is operator error. What temps were these steaks cooked at? Was it gas or charcoal? I'm betting gas since it was tough. Too many variables that the operator can do to make a poor steak, rather than having a poor steak. JMO

patteeu
02-17-2010, 07:21 AM
Drown it in salt and let it sit for 30 min. Rinse it off and pat it dry.

This is the answer that came to my mind as well. I don't cook for a living, but I do read ChiefsPlanet fairly religiously and not that long ago, someone posted this link:

How to Turn Cheap “Choice” Steak into Gucci “Prime” Steak (http://steamykitchen.com/163-how-to-turn-cheap-choice-steaks-into-gucci-prime-steaks.html)

patteeu
02-17-2010, 07:23 AM
Buy some chicken breasts from costco....place a breast between two pieces of saran wrap and use the mallet to tenderize them...To prepare...

ingredients: three eggs - beat'n
one cup of flour with salt and pepper
on cup of panko bread crumbs

Directions: Dip each breast in the eggs (like french toast), dredge in flour and then panko. repeat with all chicken and let sit in the fridge for at least 30 minutes...the longer the better as this helps the bread crumbs adhere to the chicken (egg batter cools) and cooks better. I like to prepare this LONG before I start my other side dishes and it cooks FAST.

When ready to cook heat some olive oil or what ever oil you prefer to smoke (medium high) and cook on each side until golden brown (roughly 5 minutes on each side). It's basically chicken fried chicken and it's so damn tender you can cut it with a fork and eat it by itself.

My kids won't eat chicken any other way....gravy and mashed potatoes are what I usually do with this meal but you could really do what ever chicken dish you desire really...be creative...

Thanks, Man! Sounds like I could do a nice chicken Parmesan dish with this as well.

I do that with a wine, garlic, mushroom sauce. Kind of a cooking moron's version of Chicken Marsala.

I've done it as Chicken Parmesan too.

One of my favorite meals that my mom cooked when I was growing up was basically this recipe with round steak instead of chicken. She usually had mashed potatoes and gravy with the breaded steak. More recently, she's been using sirloin instead of round steak for this.

tooge
02-17-2010, 07:36 AM
Sirloin is actually my go to cut. It is the most flavorful piece of meat on the cow as far as pure "steak" taste. It needs to age a bit first, then it cant be cooked past medium rare or it will be tough. I wouldn't use anything other that salt, pepper, and garlic powder.

Great Expectations
02-17-2010, 07:53 AM
Okay, that's what I thought.

It seems like the simplest solution is a tenderizer, like the model Braincase suggested.

But, I don't know that I want to spend $25 dollars for $15 dollars worth of steak I'll probably never buy again.

Truth be told, I only eat red meat about 15 times a year.

The overwhelming majority of my meat intake is chicken and fish.

The Jacquard tenderizer is best used on chicken and pork. I have one and never use it on steak, of course I don't by crappy steak or marinate it.

It works well on chicken and pork because it helps the meat cook faster (as much as 30-35% faster) so it doesn't dry out as much. It also helps the meat take in the marinade.

Chiefnj2
02-17-2010, 07:59 AM
http://steamykitchen.com/163-how-to-turn-cheap-choice-steaks-into-gucci-prime-steaks.html

Garcia Bronco
02-17-2010, 08:03 AM
If you want more flavor for less...buy ribeyes. I don't prefer them but I think you can get by on them.

RJ
02-17-2010, 08:33 AM
Plenty of good CP cooks and plenty of ways to do a sirloin, no doubt.

One thing I have found in the past 10 or so years is that not all steaks labeled sirloin are the same. I suppose they all come from the same section of the cow but they're not always cut alike. Around here, if I buy a sirloin at my local butcher it looks like the same cut that was considered a quality piece of meat back in the day. It's generally a sort of roundish shape with some marbling and sells for $6-7 a pound. But if I buy what is labeled sirloin at a local grocery store, they are cut to look like a strip steak, have very little marbling and sell for $4-5 a pound. For whatever reason or reasons, the sirloin from the butcher has considerably better flavor and texture.

Someone told me - maybe someone here? - that sirloins in groceries are now cut to be more sir and less loin, or something like that. Anyway, it's worth considering spending a little more for better meat. The quality of the sirloin I buy has a lot to do with how I decide to prepare it.

Great Expectations
02-17-2010, 09:34 AM
You are probably getting bottom sirloin when you bye it at the grocery store and getting top sirloin when purchasing it at your local butcher.

tooge
02-17-2010, 09:36 AM
Plenty of good CP cooks and plenty of ways to do a sirloin, no doubt.

One thing I have found in the past 10 or so years is that not all steaks labeled sirloin are the same. I suppose they all come from the same section of the cow but they're not always cut alike. Around here, if I buy a sirloin at my local butcher it looks like the same cut that was considered a quality piece of meat back in the day. It's generally a sort of roundish shape with some marbling and sells for $6-7 a pound. But if I buy what is labeled sirloin at a local grocery store, they are cut to look like a strip steak, have very little marbling and sell for $4-5 a pound. For whatever reason or reasons, the sirloin from the butcher has considerably better flavor and texture.

Someone told me - maybe someone here? - that sirloins in groceries are now cut to be more sir and less loin, or something like that. Anyway, it's worth considering spending a little more for better meat. The quality of the sirloin I buy has a lot to do with how I decide to prepare it.
you can stick your head up a butchers ass.....

Bwana
02-17-2010, 09:45 AM
Hmmm, You can either marinate them, or "beat your meat" with a meat hammer. :D

I'll tell you what Dane, I try to avoid that cut and stick with quality rib steaks. If you are looking for tender, juicy, melt in your mouth steaks, that's the only route to go.

DaneMcCloud
02-17-2010, 10:39 AM
Hey Guys,

Thanks for all of the replies. As I mentioned in the OP, high quality cuts are available but they'll cost anywhere from $17.99 to $23.99. I've never had a problem with grilling, flavor or "operator error" with the higher-end cuts or corn-fed Midwestern beef.

This particular sirloin however was only $3.19 a pound at Costco. There is little "marbling" but there is fat on the edges which I did not touch before grilling.

I'll definitely give many of these suggestions a whirl and report back. If the steak is still tough and not flavorful, I'll grill up the remainder and give to my Labs as treat.

Thanks again to everyone!

Bi_polar
02-17-2010, 10:44 AM
Hey Guys,

Thanks for all of the replies. As I mentioned in the OP, high quality cuts are available but they'll cost anywhere from $17.99 to $23.99. I've never had a problem with grilling, flavor or "operator error" with the higher-end cuts or corn-fed Midwestern beef.

This particular sirloin however was only $3.19 a pound at Costco. There is little "marbling" but there is fat on the edges which I did not touch before grilling.

I'll definitely give many of these suggestions a whirl and report back. If the steak is still tough and not flavorful, I'll grill up the remainder and give to my Labs as treat.

Thanks again to everyone!

Be sure you try that marinade (the bottle I attached) - It's also great on Chicken, just marinate it in tupperware overnight and you're all set.

googlegoogle
02-17-2010, 11:52 AM
That way just iodized is fine. Flavoring it though sea salt is the best.

i tried this and didn't notice much difference.

don't use iodized salt is what they say.

If you have time then try 'home dry aging' steak. Never tried it.

Fried Meat Ball!
02-17-2010, 12:24 PM
I'd use a Jaccard Meat Tenderizer, same one I use on brisket and pork loin, then let 'em sit over night with a little lemon juice to break them down a little bit more. Season them the way you want to before putting them on the grill.

I don't like marinating in much of an acid. Mostly, it just turns the outer layers to mush, but doesn't get to the inside of the steak, unless you're only cutting the steaks 1/2-inch thick. According to my Cooks Illustrated, you could try wrapping the steak in cheesecloth and putting at the back of the fridge for three days, which is a home-version of dry aging. They say it works, but I've never tried it. Obviously, the best thing you can do for tenderizing is after cooking, cut it in 1/4-3/8-inch thick slices, on the bias, across the grain.

I'm not one for doing much to tenderize.

Bi_polar
02-17-2010, 01:04 PM
I don't like marinating in much of an acid. Mostly, it just turns the outer layers to mush, but doesn't get to the inside of the steak, unless you're only cutting the steaks 1/2-inch thick. According to my Cooks Illustrated, you could try wrapping the steak in cheesecloth and putting at the back of the fridge for three days, which is a home-version of dry aging. They say it works, but I've never tried it. Obviously, the best thing you can do for tenderizing is after cooking, cut it in 1/4-3/8-inch thick slices, on the bias, across the grain.

I'm not one for doing much to tenderize.

have you tried the Liquid smoke version of that?

crazycoffey
02-17-2010, 04:44 PM
take a fork a stab a few holes in them, to open it up a little, then take some olive oil a touch of vinegar and your seasoning and mix it with a whisk. then let the steaks sit for exactly 2 hours at room temp. when their done marinating, and you've had a couple of hours to get the potatoes, veggies, or whatever else ready make sure the grill is at the right temp, throw em on flip once and lightly mainate one last time. and its all good


very good suggestion, I like marinating in beer only, little oil on the grill to make it non-stick and add any season the steak last, not only if there's salt in the seasoning. Rubs are for cheaper meat (like smoking) in my opinion.

Stewie
02-17-2010, 04:52 PM
Why buy sirloin when ribeye is a much better cut and a little more expensive. Sirloin can be all over the map in marbling, flavor, toughness, etc.. Choice cuts of ribeye can't be beat for grilling.

RJ
02-17-2010, 05:20 PM
you can stick your head up a butchers ass.....


Maybe, but I fail to see how that will get the steak any more tender.

bevischief
02-17-2010, 05:59 PM
I think salt is key. The trick is not salting too much. I don't like the taste of salt itself, but, when the right amount is used, it can really bring out the flavor in what you're cooking.

Sea Salt.

DJ's left nut
02-17-2010, 06:14 PM
As has already been mentioned - room temperature makes a big difference.

Additionally, make sure you pat them dry before you put them on your heat. If you try to sear wet meat, you flash steam it more than you sear it; it makes a surprisingly big difference. Also DO NOT salt before cooking. Salt acts to pull moisture back to the surface and actually makes it tougher (what's the main ingredient for a jerkey cure?). If you want salt flavor, put some on after the sear and use coarse sea salt.

Finally -- HOOOOOT fire. The hotter you can get that thing, the better. What I'll do is actually use lump charcoal to start out. I set a smaller grate in the bottom of the Weber so the meat gets close to the very hot fire. I do a very fast sear on both sides (about 30 seconds/side). Then I spread out the lump charcoal, put some briquets in there and finish off for 3-4 minutes/side; depending on thickness.

A tenderizer doesn't hurt, nor does just jabbing it with a fork. I'm not a fan of the texture when you do that, but it does help make it a bit more tender. A basic olive oil/garlic marinade gives you incremental gains as well.

EDIT: Okay, evidently the consensus has been that pulling the water w/ salt tenderizes it. I've never had that experience and it will absolutely screw up your sear. I suppose I'll defer to the chain steakhouse guy, but the raw science behind sucking the liquid out of a steak (without doing anything to break up connective tissue first) to tenderize it doesn't make any sense to me.

milkman
02-17-2010, 06:20 PM
With top sirloin, I generally marinate for maybe 30 minutes using red wine, chopped garlic, worcestershire and pepper. I salt just before grilling. It can be a nice cut.

I do much the same, except I use Brandy instead of wine.

Fried Meat Ball!
02-17-2010, 06:23 PM
As has already been mentioned - room temperature makes a big difference.

Additionally, make sure you pat them dry before you put them on your heat. If you try to sear wet meat, you flash steam it more than you sear it; it makes a surprisingly big difference. Also DO NOT salt before cooking. Salt acts to pull moisture back to the surface and actually makes it tougher (what's the main ingredient for a jerkey cure?). If you want salt flavor, put some on after the sear and use coarse sea salt.

Finally -- HOOOOOT fire. The hotter you can get that thing, the better. What I'll do is actually use lump charcoal to start out. I set a smaller grate in the bottom of the Weber so the meat gets close to the very hot fire. I do a very fast sear on both sides (about 30 seconds/side). Then I spread out the lump charcoal, put some briquets in there and finish off for 3-4 minutes/side; depending on thickness.

A tenderizer doesn't hurt, nor does just jabbing it with a fork. I'm not a fan of the texture when you do that, but it does help make it a bit more tender. A basic olive oil/garlic marinade gives you incremental gains as well.

Your salting paragraph is SORT OF incorrect and SORT OF correct. You absolutely should not salt right before cooking. However, you can have very good effects by salting 30-45 minutes before cooking. The salt will draw moisture out of the steak, however, after some time, the steak will draw that moisture back in, as well as the now-dissolved salt and season the inside of the steak.

Bi_polar
02-17-2010, 06:27 PM
Your salting paragraph is SORT OF incorrect and SORT OF correct. You absolutely should not salt right before cooking. However, you can have very good effects by salting 30-45 minutes before cooking. The salt will draw moisture out of the steak, however, after some time, the steak will draw that moisture back in, as well as the now-dissolved salt and season the inside of the steak.

If that Mf'er is still breathing, I want NO part of it.

DJ's left nut
02-17-2010, 06:30 PM
Your salting paragraph is SORT OF incorrect and SORT OF correct. You absolutely should not salt right before cooking. However, you can have very good effects by salting 30-45 minutes before cooking. The salt will draw moisture out of the steak, however, after some time, the steak will draw that moisture back in, as well as the now-dissolved salt and season the inside of the steak.

Ah, I see what you're saying. I added an edit as I got further into the thread, but that makes a little more sense.

I still don't see how that would make it more tender, though. Even if the meat is able to re-claim the moisture, it would just put back what was already there and in the process of doing so, add a meat 'cure' in the salt. I know I don't think of tender when I think of cured meat. Even in a salt 'marinade', there's nothing there that's going to break down the connective tissue to actually make the meat more tender.

That probably would give you a good salt flavor throughout the meat, but unless you're grilling a 3 inch filet, what's the point? Every bite is going to have that outer crust on it, so if you get a good salt flavor on the outside, you get all the salt you'd need.

I may give it a shot one of these days, but ultimately it seems like a lot more prep for not much upshot. A nice turn with a sea salt grinder after your sear should give you the flavor you want, but everyone has their own theory.

RJ
02-17-2010, 06:33 PM
Your salting paragraph is SORT OF incorrect and SORT OF correct. You absolutely should not salt right before cooking. However, you can have very good effects by salting 30-45 minutes before cooking. The salt will draw moisture out of the steak, however, after some time, the steak will draw that moisture back in, as well as the now-dissolved salt and season the inside of the steak.



That's the idea behind dry brining. After a day or so you can see liquid that has been drawn out but the next day it has all been reabsorbed. I did it with a Thanksgiving turkey and was very happy with the results.

mlyonsd
02-17-2010, 07:38 PM
Marinate for 1-2 hours with:

3/4 C Soy Sauce
1/4 C Ketchup
2 T Sesame Oil
1/4 slice onion

Get your grill as hot as it can get.

Cook on your highest grill heat about 3-4 minutes per side.

Easy 6
02-17-2010, 09:23 PM
Someone on the Planet said to cake it in table salt for atleast 12 hours...

Fried Meat Ball!
02-18-2010, 05:04 AM
Ah, I see what you're saying. I added an edit as I got further into the thread, but that makes a little more sense.

I still don't see how that would make it more tender, though. Even if the meat is able to re-claim the moisture, it would just put back what was already there and in the process of doing so, add a meat 'cure' in the salt. I know I don't think of tender when I think of cured meat. Even in a salt 'marinade', there's nothing there that's going to break down the connective tissue to actually make the meat more tender.

That probably would give you a good salt flavor throughout the meat, but unless you're grilling a 3 inch filet, what's the point? Every bite is going to have that outer crust on it, so if you get a good salt flavor on the outside, you get all the salt you'd need.

I may give it a shot one of these days, but ultimately it seems like a lot more prep for not much upshot. A nice turn with a sea salt grinder after your sear should give you the flavor you want, but everyone has their own theory.
I don't think it would make it any more tender. I was just saying that the idea you shouldn't ever salt beforehand wasn't necessarily true. You can with very good results.

As for the extra prep time, that's not really much of a problem for me - I don't put a cold steak on a hot grill anyway. My steaks always sit out for an hour or so before they get cooked, so I can use that time to season it, inside and out.

the Talking Can
02-18-2010, 06:22 AM
i would never put a steak on the fire without serious, and extended amounts of foreplay....

patteeu
02-18-2010, 07:21 AM
Someone on the Planet said to cake it in table salt for atleast 12 hours...

12 hours seems too long. The article I linked in post 73 has a table suggesting times of up to about 1 hour depending on the thickness of the cut.

patteeu
02-18-2010, 07:29 AM
Ah, I see what you're saying. I added an edit as I got further into the thread, but that makes a little more sense.

I still don't see how that would make it more tender, though. Even if the meat is able to re-claim the moisture, it would just put back what was already there and in the process of doing so, add a meat 'cure' in the salt. I know I don't think of tender when I think of cured meat. Even in a salt 'marinade', there's nothing there that's going to break down the connective tissue to actually make the meat more tender.

That probably would give you a good salt flavor throughout the meat, but unless you're grilling a 3 inch filet, what's the point? Every bite is going to have that outer crust on it, so if you get a good salt flavor on the outside, you get all the salt you'd need.

I may give it a shot one of these days, but ultimately it seems like a lot more prep for not much upshot. A nice turn with a sea salt grinder after your sear should give you the flavor you want, but everyone has their own theory.

Check this out:

<h2>How Salting Works</h2>
<p><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3216/2523531309_a1e5de1ce1.jpg" alt="" /></p>
<p>All of you who season JUST before grilling – this is what you are really doing to the meat. Did you know that? All the water comes to the surface and if you don’t pat super-dry, you’re basically STEAMING the meat. Plus, your salt just sits on the surface of the steak, leaving the interior tasteless.</p>
<p><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2037/2524356176_eb011258f8.jpg" alt="" /></p>
<p>Now – note that only a little of the salt gets to go back into the meat. Don’t worry – you aren’t going to be eating all that salt!</p>

<p><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2376/2524356244_faf64e1a0c.jpg" alt="" /></p>
<p>Bourbon does that to me too.</p>
<p><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2411/2523531455_605de5296c.jpg" alt="" /></p>
<p>I can hear it now..BUT!!! What of all the water that stayed on the surface of the meat? Aren’t you drawing all the moisture out of the meat? Will it taste like a salt lick? (*%!*%!@#!#!!! I DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS STEAK RECIPE!!!</p>
<p>Pull your pants back on and keep reading…</p>
<p><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2346/2524356324_ff4c99a2a7.jpg" alt="" /></p>

MOhillbilly
02-18-2010, 07:33 AM
Sea Salt.

my old lady is scared of sea salt cause she thinks itll give her a goiter?:shake:

tooge
02-18-2010, 07:34 AM
I feel that it isn't so much the cut but how it is prepared and served. As an example, some of the beefiest tasting and tender and juicy beef available is a slow cooked brisket. To me, some of the least flavorfull and textureless meat is the tenderloin, although it is very tender and juicy. All in all, I just love a sirloin even though it gets the rep of being a lesser cut. It simply has to be medium rare to rare though. Cook a ribeye that way and they can lose the textural constitution. All meat is good though

Fried Meat Ball!
02-18-2010, 10:14 AM
I feel that it isn't so much the cut but how it is prepared and served. As an example, some of the beefiest tasting and tender and juicy beef available is a slow cooked brisket. To me, some of the least flavorfull and textureless meat is the tenderloin, although it is very tender and juicy. All in all, I just love a sirloin even though it gets the rep of being a lesser cut. It simply has to be medium rare to rare though. Cook a ribeye that way and they can lose the textural constitution. All meat is good though

I like a good chuck steak for flavor. Tenderloin is a great cut only because it's so tender. But go to a restaurant, and you'll almost always find tenderloin served with some kind of sauce or other flavor compound. There's simply not a lot of "steak" flavor there. That's why I much prefer rib eye.

But give me a tenderloin for steak au poivre. :drool:

Frosty
02-18-2010, 10:44 AM
I like a good chuck steak for flavor.

A chuck steak is surprisingly good, though it can be tough in spots.

Chuck eyes are rare but definitely worth searching out. All the flavor of the best part of the chuck but well marbled and tender.

Ribeyes are my staple. I buy a slab and dry age it in the fridge. Just slice off a steak when I need one and I am good to go. They will easily last 3 - 4 weeks that way and it avoids having to freeze the meat. Plus, the steaks just taste better and better as you go. :drool:

I don't buy sirloin as I just haven't gotten in a good one in ages. The one kind I do buy, though, is tri tip. That is one of my favorite cuts but tends to be be expensive. If I can get a pack on markdown, I'll get it.

MOhillbilly
02-18-2010, 10:47 AM
dane, whats a tri-tip go for per# out your way?

DaneMcCloud
02-18-2010, 11:42 AM
dane, whats a tri-tip go for per# out your way?

I'll have to check the next time I'm at the market. I usually tend to stick with NY Strip steaks that are shipped in from the midwest or New York because the Cal beef sucks so much ass. My parents don't even like the California cheese! My dad won't even eat it. There's just something different about California raised cows versus the Midwestern cows.

This beef purchase was the first Cal beef purchase in a long, long time. I don't even buy hamburger at Costco or Ralphs or whatever because next to what I can get specialty markets, it's not even worth eating.

Stewie
02-18-2010, 03:33 PM
I feel that it isn't so much the cut but how it is prepared and served. As an example, some of the beefiest tasting and tender and juicy beef available is a slow cooked brisket. To me, some of the least flavorfull and textureless meat is the tenderloin, although it is very tender and juicy. All in all, I just love a sirloin even though it gets the rep of being a lesser cut. It simply has to be medium rare to rare though. Cook a ribeye that way and they can lose the textural constitution. All meat is good though

The ribeye isn't a better cut because it's tender, it's a better cut because it has great flavor. That's why it's the cut of choice for grilling. There's a reason they make steak knives.

Cuts of steak can be broken down into three sections. Starting on the upper back and moving down to the mid-back you have the rib, the short loin and the sirloin. The rib contains cuts such as the Rib Roast, the Rib-eye Steak and the back ribs. This is the least tender section of the three. The short loin produces the T-bone, Top Loin Steak, Tenderloin and the Porterhouse. The Sirloin gives the Sirloin Steak, and the Top Sirloin. Other steaks like the chuck, round and flank steak come from those respective areas and tend to be tough cuts of meat. Strips steaks, like the New York Steak is cut from the T-bone portion.

mlyonsd
02-18-2010, 05:05 PM
dane, whats a tri-tip go for per# out your way?

Tri-tips rock.

BigOlChiefsfan
02-18-2010, 06:07 PM
For really tough meat, I always recommend papaya. It contains an enzyme (papayin) that will break down the tough tissue and it can improve tough meat mo' bettah than any other ingredient that I've found. Adolf's meat tendrizer uses papayin - so do 'knock-offs'. Use liberally on tough meat and give it some time to work. So if Old Dobbin broke thru one too many fences just add some chopped papaya to the hossflesh stew.

I like good sirloin but I tend to marinate grocery-store sirloin and cook it as a kebab rather than as whole steak most of the time. Flavor is good as kebab esp. if you leave room between hunks and get a good 'char' going - don't muck up the kebab w/lots of veggies that will overcook before the meat is done, make some veggie kebabs and let them cook at their own pace. Sesame oil is sirloin's friend.

If you want to try a tasty but lean cut...look for a flank steak. I like them marinated/room temp for an hour or so. It's important to sear it well over high heat, take it off and let it rest 10 minutes before slicing thin across the grain. Good flavor this way. It's good grill-panned indoors as well as on a real grill (turn on the exhaust fan). Here are a couple recipes I use for tasty beef that won't break the bank.

part 1 (http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/01/marinated-flank-steak-part-one/) part 2 (http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/01/marinated-flank-steak-part-2-come-to-mama/) of marinated flank steaks

Seared Flank steak w/broccoli (http://icookstuff.blogspot.com/2008/08/pan-seared-flank-steak-and-broccoli.html) My fave

flat iron steak (http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Flat-Iron-Steak-with-Herb-Butter?cmpid=enews101909) - sub. chuck tenders or good sirloin if your butcher doesn't know what flat iron is (regional name - also known as 'top chuck steak' or 'blade chuck')

DaneMcCloud
02-19-2010, 08:39 PM
Okay, here's the latest:

I took the Top Sirloin out of the fridge and covered each cut heavily with sea salt. I let them sit for exactly 30 minutes, which also brought them to room temperature. I thoroughly rinsed and put a little butter on top, along with some rub and warmed up the grill to 650 degrees.

At first, I cooked them on each side for 3.5 minutes and brought them inside. Once cut open, they were still extremely rare (these cuts are more than 2 inches thick, probably closer to 3 inches). After cutting into small 4x2.5" pieces, I put them back on the grill for about 5 minutes at 400 degrees.

The result: Not bad! Much more tender and flavorful. Since this was an "experiment", I only made enough steak for me but I gave a few pieces to the wife who proclaimed "Yeah, not too bad".

I'll do another run on Sunday (JFC, this will be the most steak I've eaten in a week in about 20 years!). I think I'll need to modify my grill temperature and time, but I think they'll at least be fairly edible, though I'm not likely to purchase this cut again.

Thanks for all of the suggestions!

Phobia
02-20-2010, 02:37 AM
I can't believe I skimmed the whole thread, which has some good ideas. But I didn't see more call for slicing it on the bias. That would make all the difference in the world.

Saccopoo
02-20-2010, 02:54 AM
I can't believe I skimmed the whole thread, which has some good ideas. But I didn't see more call for slicing it on the bias. That would make all the difference in the world.

I doubt it. Dane bought some rump roasts at the Hi-Vee, and then minced them up and put them on a shiskabob that was encrusted with Lemon Pepper and MSG and wondered why his "steaks" didn't taste hi-end.

It was doomed from the start.

Fried Meat Ball!
02-20-2010, 06:08 AM
I can't believe I skimmed the whole thread, which has some good ideas. But I didn't see more call for slicing it on the bias. That would make all the difference in the world.

No faith, Phil....

I don't like marinating in much of an acid. Mostly, it just turns the outer layers to mush, but doesn't get to the inside of the steak, unless you're only cutting the steaks 1/2-inch thick. According to my Cooks Illustrated, you could try wrapping the steak in cheesecloth and putting at the back of the fridge for three days, which is a home-version of dry aging. They say it works, but I've never tried it. Obviously, the best thing you can do for tenderizing is after cooking, cut it in 1/4-3/8-inch thick slices, on the bias, across the grain.

I'm not one for doing much to tenderize.