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View Full Version : Computers Wiring help needed (Ethernet crappola)


JD10367
02-18-2010, 07:38 AM
Okay, first, let me state for the record that I'm a moron. Some of you may have already gleaned this.

Here's my situation.

I have:

1.) A POS computer.
2.) A POS cable modem (one Ethernet hole to go to the POS computer).
3.) A TiVo Series 2 DT which is hooked up via phone line.
4.) An iPod Touch that has suddenly stopped reaching the Internet because the neighbors got smart and turned off their unsecure networks. :(

Now, I'm thinking it's time I buy a wireless router so I can use my iPod Touch legally in the comfort of my own home. I think I'm pretty set on that: BestBuy sells two relatively cheap wireless routers (a Belkin for $34.99 and a NetGear for $39.99... don't see much of a difference between them).

So, I'm thinking, if I'm gonna buy a wireless router, I should probably buy the TiVo Network Wireless Adapter, so my TiVo can get its stuff from the Internet and not the phone line. (Many advantages: I can download movies and shows, I can access the TiVo from a computer outside the house to set programs, the TiVo will check regularly for program updates and not once a day, I would really no longer need a house phone, etc.,.).

So I look for it in BestBuy: they want to f**k me for $69 for it.

I check TiVo.com... not much better ($59 and I'm sure by the time they tax me it'll be the same as BestBuy).

However: there is a wired Ethernet port on the back of the Series 2 DT which they sort of don't tell you about. Apparently you can used a WIRED connection to the Internet with this port. They don't tell you 'cause they'd rather you buy the Wireless Adapter and give them money.

Cool! I'll just plug the TiVo into the Internet. Problem: the crappy cable modem only has one port.

So, to make a long story short, here's the question: I was looking at wired routers. But if I buy a wireless router, the chain would normally go:

Cable jack in wall ---COAX---> Cable Modem ---ETHERNET--> Wireless Router ---ETHERNET---> Home Desktop

thus allowing your home desktop to still get to the Internet, and now a wireless router. But I notice that they come with MULTIPLE Ethernet ports on the back... I assume so you can connect multiple things THROUGH the router, no? In other words, if I buy a long Ethernet cable, can I plug the TiVo into the wireless router and thus have it feed on through to the cable modem? To wit, is a wireless router simply a wired router that also happens to have an antenna on it, and I don't need to buy two routers?

tymania
02-18-2010, 07:44 AM
You pretty much got it.. all you need is a wireless router. Then you can plug your Tivo into it, and your computer(if you dont have wireless on your comp) and then connect wirelessly with your ipod touch..

The one thing to note is that you will need to plug the ethernet cord running from the cable modem to the router in the "Uplink" port on the router.. other than that it is a real easy set up..
Walmart usually has a Belkin wireless router you can get for under $50..
IF you have any problems let me know.

Lzen
02-18-2010, 09:23 AM
Pretty much. Wireless routers are, like you said, basically wired and wireless all in one. Typically, they have 4 wired ports as well as wireless.

JD10367
02-18-2010, 11:10 AM
Sweet. That's what I thought. So tomorrow I pick up a wireless router and a long Ethernet (and the TiVo isn't new so it's type 5 which will be cheaper) and I'm good to go. Thanks.

jjchieffan
02-18-2010, 12:29 PM
Personally, I have had better luck with Linksys routers, and walmart has one for around $45 right now. I have set it up for 2 of my friends lately, and it is working great.

Lzen
02-18-2010, 12:48 PM
Personally, I have had better luck with Linksys routers, and walmart has one for around $45 right now. I have set it up for 2 of my friends lately, and it is working great.

I would also endorse Linksys. :thumb:

JD10367
02-18-2010, 12:52 PM
Edumacate me, peoples. Belkin is $35 (WorstBuy), NetGear is $40 (WorstBuy), LinkSys is $45 (Wally World). What's the difference? They're all little square boxes with stubby antennae. Don't you just plug the cables in and turn the puppy on? I'm asking a serious question, here, 'cause I'l have to do it tomorrow, LOL... Is there that much of a difference between them all?

Lzen
02-18-2010, 12:54 PM
Edumacate me, peoples. Belkin is $35 (WorstBuy), NetGear is $40 (WorstBuy), LinkSys is $45 (Wally World). What's the difference? They're all little squares boxes with stubby antennae. Don't you just plug the cables in and turn the puppy on? I'm asking a serious question, here, 'cause I'l have to do it tomorrow, LOL... Is there that much of a difference between them all?

I admit that I don't have much experience with Belkin or Netgear. And I do believe that like any other product, some models from a company are better than others. That being said, Linksys overall seem to be more reliable and user friendly. If you have model numbers of the particular routers you have in mind, you could look up customer reviews on other websites (such as Amazon.com). I think customer reviews are invaluable. The more the better.

Fish
02-18-2010, 01:13 PM
Like most things, you usually get what you pay for.

The more expensive routers have additional features, and may offer a faster connection type. Normally the more expensive ones have much better security features as well. The more expensive ones have better antennas too. If you want really good wireless range, I wouldn't just get the cheapest one.

Just be sure that the router you choose has decent transfer speeds. Routers come in several different "ratings". There are wireless A, B, G, N, and just about every combination of each(A + G, B + G, etc.). In general, the higher the letter, the faster the connection. But that's also dependent on the computer that's connecting to it. Some older computers may only be able to use wireless B. It might do good to check the wireless cards in any wireless devices you will be using before you buy.

As far as brands, I think it's just luck of the draw. I've had all three brands, and I think the Linksys was the most dependable and gave the best signal range.

Lzen
02-18-2010, 01:16 PM
Like most things, you usually get what you pay for.

The more expensive routers have additional features, and may offer a faster connection type. Normally the more expensive ones have much better security features as well. The more expensive ones have better antennas too. If you want really good wireless range, I wouldn't just get the cheapest one.

Just be sure that the router you choose has decent transfer speeds. Routers come in several different "ratings". There are wireless A, B, G, N, and just about every combination of each(A + G, B + G, etc.). In general, the higher the letter, the faster the connection. But that's also dependent on the computer that's connecting to it. Some older computers may only be able to use wireless B. It might do good to check the wireless cards in any wireless devices you will be using before you buy.

As far as brands, I think it's just luck of the draw. I've had all three brands, and I think the Linksys was the most dependable and gave the best signal range.

It didn't even occur to me that he might not be aware of the connection speed. Do they even sell A routers anymore?

Fish
02-18-2010, 01:48 PM
It didn't even occur to me that he might not be aware of the connection speed. Do they even sell A routers anymore?

Yeah.... I saw one the other day on a really cheap special promotion. Had A only, didn't even have B. It was going for $14.99, and at that price I'm sure somebody bought one not realizing the speed sucked.

JD10367
02-18-2010, 02:14 PM
The NetGear ($40) is an 802.11g and says,

◦Up to 54 Mbps data transfer rates, almost 5 times more than typical 802.11b rates
◦Powerful WEP encryption (40/64- or 128-bit)
◦Delivers 10/100 Mbps WAN and LAN connections and interoperability with 54 Mbps (802.11g) and 11 Mbps (802.11b) devices over a 2.4GHz band wireless network

The Belkin ($35) just says it's a "Wireless-G Router" and:

◦Wireless-G technology
Delivers improved range and performance.
◦Up to 54 Mbps data transfer rates
With Wireless-G connectivity for high-speed Internet access.
◦Compatible with draft 802.11g
Backward compatible with 802.11b for ensured connectivity.
◦Built-in 4-port Ethernet switch
Connects wired network PCs and devices.
◦Built-in network status display LEDs
Include power, security, wireless, wired, modem and Internet to keep you informed of your system's status.
◦Wi-Fi protected setup push button
For simple wireless security setup.
◦Compatible with PC and Mac
To ensure flexible setup options.

And I thought all these things are password-protectable, no? Hence the reason most of the wireless routers in my apartment building have a little "lock" symbol next to them when I try to steal their signal... er, I mean, when I try to use my iPod Touch?

JD10367
02-18-2010, 02:14 PM
Oh, yeah, and range isn't an issue; the farthest I'll be from the wireless router is probably 25 feet. (My apartment's the size of a shoebox.)

Fish
02-18-2010, 02:29 PM
I'm guessing the Belkin might not be able to run B and G connections at the same time though. I think that's the difference between the two. Meaning that if you have a wireless B computer, the router will have to be in B mode for all connections. The older Belkins were this way at least. If you don't have any B wireless devices, that won't be a problem though and everything will run in the faster G mode.

Lzen
02-18-2010, 02:41 PM
I'm guessing the Belkin might not be able to run B and G connections at the same time though. I think that's the difference between the two. Meaning that if you have a wireless B computer, the router will have to be in B mode for all connections. The older Belkins were this way at least. If you don't have any B wireless devices, that won't be a problem though and everything will run in the faster G mode.

I have run into that type of situation in the past. Nothing sucks more than having to set your router to a slower speed just because 1 of the devices can't go any higher and the router doesn't do more than one speed at the same time.

DaFace
02-18-2010, 05:14 PM
Consumer-oriented wireless routers are 99% interchangeable these days in terms of what they are supposed to do. You're really just paying for the brand. I like Linksys, Netgear, and Belkin in that order.

As an aside, you're probably gonna end up needing an extra ethernet cord somewhere along the line. You'll probably be impatient and just grab one at the store, but I'd be remiss if I didn't tell you you could get one for a fraction of the cost at monoprice.com.

JD10367
02-19-2010, 09:00 PM
Bought the NetGear. Plugged everything in, dropped in the install DVD... boom, set up. Turned on my iPod Touch, logged into the router. Plugged in my TiVo and IT told ME it was now on the Internet and no longer needed the phone line. Downloaded a program from TiVo.com and can now move TiVoed shows to my puter.

Technology f**king ROCKS. :D

Mosbonian
02-20-2010, 11:31 PM
So...here's a question for DirecTV experts...

Why is there still a need for all the boxes? With wireless technology why can't there just be one box centrally located in the house that allows me to pull the signal to any TV in the house?

mmaddog
********

DaFace
02-21-2010, 12:01 AM
So...here's a question for DirecTV experts...

Why is there still a need for all the boxes? With wireless technology why can't there just be one box centrally located in the house that allows me to pull the signal to any TV in the house?

mmaddog
********

You'd still need a wireless box with each TV to decode the signal, so you're really not eliminating anything. That, combined with the high bandwidth requirements of video and the unreliability of most home networks, doesn't make it something they want to deal with very much.

DirecTV is beta testing technology that would allow you to watch DVR recordings from one box on another one in your house, provided they're both network connected. So, someday in the future there may be a way to centralize it all, but it's a few years off at least.

Mosbonian
02-21-2010, 12:09 AM
You'd still need a wireless box with each TV to decode the signal, so you're really not eliminating anything. That, combined with the high bandwidth requirements of video and the unreliability of most home networks, doesn't make it something they want to deal with very much.

DirecTV is beta testing technology that would allow you to watch DVR recordings from one box on another one in your house, provided they're both network connected. So, someday in the future there may be a way to centralize it all, but it's a few years off at least.

Couldn't it be a wireless device just like you have to have for the Xbox 360?

mmaddog
********

DaFace
02-21-2010, 12:46 AM
Couldn't it be a wireless device just like you have to have for the Xbox 360?

mmaddog
********

Conceivably? Sure. Right now, though, they're just developing it for their own HD DVR's.